In rotation: 12/3/15

Former Haçienda DJ selling entire 8,000-strong vinyl record collection: Buckley Boland, a former resident DJ at the now defunct nightclub, took to Facebook to announce that he is open to “serious offers” for his 8,000-strong collection. Boland said that the decision of fellow Haçienda veteran Dave Haslam to sell his 4,000-record collection to DJ Seth Troxler last month (November) made him consider shifting his own backlog.

South Korea Just Opened an Incredible Vinyl Record Library: Featuring 10,000 vinyl records and 3,000 books, the public library is a music lover’s paradise. Its two above-ground levels are stocked with rare albums, like the controversial “butcher cover” edition of The Beatles’ 1966 album Yesterday and Today, as well as every issue of Rolling Stone published since 1967. In the basement, Understage houses a performance space to support independent musicians and holds regular shows.

See inside Jack White’s Third Man Records store in Detroit: The store is painted black and yellow with flashes of lipstick red. There’s an impressive radio tower on top of the building. The entire facade is a window, and the ceilings sit high.

The rise and fall — and rise again — of vinyl: “Some would say it’s because of the sound. If you ask audiophiles, they’ll always contend that analog formats are superior to any digital media in terms of fidelity. Warmth, tonality, dynamics: these are terms you’ve probably heard bandied about during those sorts of discussions. If you ask completists, it’s the collectibility factor. For casual fans, however, the appeal is tied to something tactile…

Vinyl hunters find hidden gems in crates of collectables: “Vinyl records are being revived; it’s come back in such a big way, I really think it’s important to keep physical records. I love having something so big to hold and look at the cover.” He said he had about 50 records in his collection, growing rapidly.

Old and rare vinyl record collection taken during Watford burglary: All the records, by artists including Michael Jackson, UB40 and Level 42, were still in their sleeves. PC Sarah-Ann Feeney said: “The stolen records covered a variety of music genres and many of them were extremely rare and distinctive…”

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