In rotation: 6/21/17

Record Theatre kicks off closing sale: It’s the end of an era. After 30 years, the iconic Record Theatre is closing its doors. Lovers of music, movies and books have been buying their favorite classics at this store for decades. At one time, it’s popularity and success spread across a chain of six record stores in the area, now its just down to one – the flagship store on Main Street in Buffalo. A “go-to” spot for the hardest to find vinyl records, CDs, DVDs and even cassette tapes, the legacy Record Theatre leaves behind is unlike any other. “It’s a bummer. It’s like one of your friends moves and you’re not really sure the next time you’re going to see them because they’re moving too far,” Joe Seivert says.

How a San Marco business owner is selling vinyl in the digital age: William Brueck comes from a family of music lovers. His father, Bill Brueck, owned Yesterday & Today Records off Baymeadows in the 90’s. After a lull, Brueck opened a new one under the same name at the Beach Blvd. flea market to great success. On May 31, Yesterday & Today Records moved to a more permanent home in San Marco…“A lot of the popularity is it sounds better,” Brueck said. “The pure analog sound is easier on your ears and the sound is more robust, thicker. That’s the word a lot of people use, thicker. A record doesn’t leave anything out.”

Elbow release Record Store Day film to accompany All Disco: Elbow have released a short documentary-style film to accompany their track All Disco. The song originally appeared on Guy Garvey and co’s latest album Little Fictions, which came out in February via Polydor/Concord. The video was filmed during this year’s Record Store Day and features interviews with people about what music means to them as well as asking people for their favourite song and guilty pleasures. The short film is said to be about “the importance of music but also a reminder of the joy and community that music brings to our lives.”

Vinyl finds a home, Telluride Music’s new owners add LPs, will host live events: Telluride Music Company (333 West Colorado Ave.) recently made room on its shelves for the again-beloved LP. Tom Nading, the store’s new co-owner, insisted it was not a financial decision, but a personal one. “I wish I could tell you that we are really business savvy but the main reason we are doing it is because I collect vinyl and don’t have anywhere to buy it,” he said. Most of Nading’s friends have a record player, he said, and he wanted to provide a location for them to “dig.” “A big part of vinyl is the dig and going to shops and looking through,” he said. “We want to provide a place for people to do that in town.

Aussie Artists Open Up About What Vinyl Records Mean To Them: Even in a world of streaming services, digital downloads, and more music formats than you can shake a stick at, the humble vinyl record is as popular as ever, if not more so. Spurred on by nostalgia, romance, good old-fashioned tangibility and the mystical ‘warmth’ that pervades a quality LP pressing, the ol’ black wax is in the midst of an unarguable renaissance. So, we touched base with three Aussie artists — Paul Dempsey, Meg Mac and Birds Of Tokyo skinsman Adam Weston — who currently, or soon will, have new releases out on vinyl to find out what attracts them to classic records to this day.

Third Man Records to release deluxe reissue box set of The White Stripes’ ‘Icky Thump’: Third Man Records have announced they will release a deluxe reissue box set of The White Stripes‘ ‘Icky Thump‘. The record was the duo’s sixth and final studio album together. It was released in 2007 and the band split four years later. It charted at Number One on the Official UK Albums Chart and won a Grammy for Best Alternative Music Album in 2008. To celebrate the album’s tenth anniversary, and The White Stripes’ 20th, Jack White’s record label will put out a coloured double LP set that will come with 12″ resissues of the record’s nine b-sides. It will also include ‘The Red Demos’ (a collection of pre-album demos), a photo book, an art print by album artwork designer Rob Jones and pin badges.

Everything old is new again: One of my very first memories as a child is of sitting on my father’s knee, singing along to the 1966 Eddy Arnold song, “Make the World Go Away.” The silky smooth tones came from the console radio/stereo record player that had a place of honor in our home. That tune, imprinted on my heart, was recorded on a disk of vinyl. A disc of vinyl that I grabbed from a pile “to be dumped” as we were cleaning out my parent’s garage a few years ago. It’s never been played since my rescue, but I smile whenever I see the album cover.

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