In rotation: 7/25/17

Why Vinyl’s Boom Is Over, As purists complain about low quality and high prices, vinyl sales taper off; Gillian Welch and David Rawlings cut their own records: Old LPs were cut from analog tapes—that’s why they sound so high quality. But the majority of today’s new and re-issued vinyl albums—around 80% or more, several experts estimate—start from digital files, even lower-quality CDs. These digital files are often loud and harsh-sounding, optimized for ear-buds, not living rooms. So the new vinyl LP is sometimes inferior to what a consumer hears on a CD. “They’re re-issuing [old albums] and not using the original tapes” to save time and money, says Michael Fremer, editor of AnalogPlanet.com and one of America’s leading audio authorities. “They have the tapes. They could take them out and have it done right—by a good engineer. They don’t.”

Pasadena, Whittier bookstores, record sellers are enjoying a Millennial-led resurgence in sales: Young people are leading to the retro trend, experts say. David Sax, who wrote “The Revenge of Analog: Real Things and Why They Matter,” said millennials, who grew up on digital technology, crave products offering a tactile experience. They also might just be bored with looking at screens, Sax said. “For many of them, especially as they get younger, digital technology is not anything new and magical — it is kind of the norm,” Sax said. “Analog is a choice.”

Vinyl makes comeback in suburban Melbourne: Australia will again make vinyl music with the nation’s first modern record press on track to open after a production hiatus of more than 30 years. The new plant is due to start operations in the Melbourne’s northern suburbs early next year and will double as an event space, hosting launches and other musical acts. “We want to make great records, support the Australian music scene and have fun along the way,” Program Records spokesman Steve Lynch said.

Putting The Record Straight: Of all comebacks, none is as son­orous as this. Veteran ‘vinylhead’ Jaydeep Joy aka Jazzy Joe, hums a happy tune as his fingers flip through the scores of rec­ords lining the racks at Radio and Gramophone House, New Delhi. And one can imagine long-haired youths from long back dancing to the tune of Aao Twist Kare, as he lays the newly pressed record of Bhoot Bangla on the turntable, placing the needle gently into the groove. Jaydeep is not alone in being ent­hralled by the scratchy perfection of Long Playing or LP records.

Vinyl gains popularity in Japan: Vinyl’s popularity will likely further grow as Sony Corp. plans to restart vinyl record production as early as March next year. “When it comes to vinyl, picking a song can be a painstaking process. It feels really good to enjoy the music’s deep, rich sounds all the way to the end,” said Rei Goto, a 19-year-old company worker from Kaisei, Kanagawa Prefecture, who was at the vinyl record section of Tower Records’ Shibuya store in Tokyo.

‘A Vinyl Affair’ – Wellington’s record fair returns: ‘A Vinyl Affair’ – Wellington’s record fair returns on 19th August 2017 at new venue the Rogue & Vagabond! With FREE ENTRY to the public, DJs spinning great vinyl all day, spot prizes, and 1000s of new and used vinyl to choose from, it’s going to be another big day for vinyl enthusiasts! There will also be food and drink available. This is a family-friendly event for music lovers of all ages. The event will be held at the Rogue & Vagabond, 18 Garrett St, Wellington on Saturday 19th August from 10am – 3pm.

Remembering L.A.’s First Great Record Store, Wallichs Music City: “Before there was a Tower Records, before the Capitol Records building was the Capitol Records building, L.A.’s coolest music-industry hub was Wallichs Music City. Glenn Wallichs opened the record store with his brother, Clyde, at the corner of Sunset Boulevard and Vine Street in 1940. Until Tower Records set up on the Sunset Strip 30 years later, Wallichs Music City was the place to go for concert tickets, sheet music, LPs, 45s, tapes, 8-tracks, cassettes, and musical instruments. It’s where a friend of mine purchased a double neck guitar right off the wall, and where my mother picked up an alto recorder for my second grade music class. Maybe you remember its radio and TV jingle: “It’s Music City, Sunset & Vine!”

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