In rotation: 7/26/17

Permanent Records, One Of Chicago’s Great Record Stores, Is Closing: Permanent Records, one of our very favorite record stores in Chicago, is closing after more than ten years in business. The owners will focus their attention on their L.A. outpost, including relocating some key staff, said co-owner Lance Barresi in an email sent to list subscribers on Monday morning. The last day of operation at the Ukrainian Village shop (1914 W. Chicago Ave.) will be Sunday, Sept. 17. Two reasons for the closing were mentioned in the announcement: The rigors of travel between the West Coast and Chicago and the Chicago store’s expiring lease (at the end of September).

Check out this new illustrated guide to looking after your vinyl: What if every record came with a set of illustrations about how to store it? While, like a packet of crisps, you can’t go wrong with “store in a cool, dry place”, new label Float have gone one better and commissioned an illustrated 7-point guide to the broad strokes of keeping your records in good nick. Found on the inner sleeve of their debut release – a pulsing, percussive album of contemporary minimalism called Ore by Andrea Belfi – the guide references the designs of by-gone major label inner sleeves that would carry related records or further instructions as standard.

Waxahatchee, Legendary Shack Shakers to headline Dogfish Head’s Analog-A-Go-Go: When Dogfish Head’s annual beer and music extravaganza known as Analog-A-Go-Go returns to Sussex County this fall, Philadelphia-based indie rock breakout Waxahatchee will be there, organizers have revealed to The News Journal. After taking a one-year detour to Bellevue State Park in New Castle County in September, Analog will return to Dogfish Head’s Milton brewery and newly-opened Rehoboth Beach brewpub on Friday, Nov. 3, and Saturday, Nov. 4. In addition to Waxahatchee’s Nov. 4 performance at the expanded brewpub, Kentucky’s Legendary Shack Shakers will bring their wild brand of rockabilly to the same room on Nov. 3. Both shows are free.

CLASSIC VINYL: River Deep Mountain High is ‘one of the most instantly recognisable pop songs of the sixties’: This album, mostly produced by Phil Spector, began as a collaboration with Tina Turner without her husband, Ike. Spector had achieved legendary status as a producer with his technique of using musicians gathered together in a small studio, harnessing layers of percussion, strings and echo chambers, resulting in a lavish wave of rolling orchestration known as the ‘wall of sound’. Spector gave a payment of $20,000 dollars to Ike Turner to keep out of the studio but also agreed to give him a songwriting credit, so although RDMH is credited to Ike and Tina, Ike Turner never sang or played a note on the recording.

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  • SUPPORTING YOUR LOCAL INDIE SHOPS SINCE 2007


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