In rotation: 9/13/17

A New Owner Is Buying Permanent Records’ Stock & Will Keep A Shop At The UKV Location: “It’s been a little less than two months since we announced the departure of Permanent Records from Chicago and it hasn’t been easy, but we’ve found a buyer! We’ll introduce these fine people in a forthcoming email, but we’re here to tell you that although it won’t be called Permanent, a record store will live on at 1914 W. Chicago Avenue. We’re in the process of preparing the new owner for business in our old location and clearing out our proverbial desks, but we’re very excited about the new direction and we’re sure you will be too.”

Rubber Soul Records set to open ‘Lemmy’s Bar’ in tribute to rock icon: A record store owner wants to pay tribute to North Staffordshire rock icon Lemmy – by opening a bar in his memory. Robert Barrs, who runs Rubber Soul Records in Hanley, has applied for a licence to open ‘Lemmy’s Bar’ in his Marsh Street shop. The bar will feature a bust of the Motörhead frontman – who was born in Burslem as Ian Kilmister – which was previously on display at the Potteries Museum. Robert, who moved his shop to Hanley from Stoke earlier this year, says the bar will be a place where customers will be able to chill out and enjoy a drink while listening to music.

Why Discogs Is Ready To Serve Much More Than Just Music: Over the last five months, Discogs has quietly launched five additional marketplace verticals under its wing, including Gearogs (music gear), Filmogs (film), Comicogs (comics), Bookogs (books) and Posterogs (concert posters). All five sites are still in public beta and host only around 20,000 contributors in total to date, but the Discogs team hopes it can translate key lessons from its music-focused growth into these other industries—particularly the value of serving niche interests and leveraging the benefits of open-source communities for fans, rights holders and retailers alike.

20 photos of Crate Diggers record fair, party series and vinyl community: With Crate Diggers gearing up for a massive string of events in Berlin, Amsterdam, London and Los Angeles, Mixmag has compiled a collection of images from past gatherings to offer an intimate look at the all-encompassing vinyl community. Not just a record fair, Discog’s Crate Diggers is also a party series that showcases the industry’s finest vinyl selectors. Lead by Zernell, a veteran of the Chicago house scene now living in Los Angeles, the event has grown immensely since it’s debut in Portland in 2014. With regards to what allows Crate Diggers to standout, Zernell says it attracts the full scope of vinyl lovers

Confession: I went record shopping right after the towers fell on 9/11: My decision to buy music that day probably could be traced to several things. First, the utter denial and lack of understanding of the scale of what was happening. Maybe I was convincing myself that none of this was happening. I have been guilty of retail therapy, or emotional shopping — and the record store had always been a place of comfort, discovery, and reflection through my youth, and even into adulthood. Never a terribly religious person, music and literature have often been great sources of strength and solace.

Montreal museum a history of sound that highlights gramophone inventor: Jean Belisle can be forgiven if he doesn’t get too excited about the recent trend back to vinyl records. That’s because part of the collection in his Montreal museum includes records that are more than 100 years old. Belisle, 68, is one of the founders of the Musee des ondes Emile Berliner, which is located in a former RCA Victor factory. Berliner was the inventor of the gramophone and the round flat disk that became the standard for listening to music for decades before records were replaced by tape decks, cassettes and CDs. The German-born Berliner invented the disk in the United States in the late 1800s to compete with Thomas Edison’s phonograph, which used a cylinder that apparently was difficult to produce and took a lot of space.

Spin the black circle: Hong Kong’s love affair with vinyl: Collectors and music fans gathered at a pop-up store last Thursday (Sept 7) to hunt for dusty old vinyl albums in Hong Kong where the format’s warm sounds continue to gain new fans. Even though there are stores in the city dedicated to selling music on wax, the pop-up concept provides a mixed bag of surprises. It brings together independent sellers who haul different crates of records for sale each time, so one never knows what gems could be unearthed. Organised by Nick Langford, a teacher and vinyl aficionado, the monthly pop-up affair is seeing a growing base of customers — from vinyl veterans to those curious to make the leap from digital to analogue.

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