In rotation: 10/10/17

Spinning the ‘Old’ with the ‘New’; Record Store Opens in Winooski: A new specialty store has opened in the Onion City, Autumn Records. The record store is located at the top of the Winooski Circle, between Scout & Co. and McKee’s Pub & Grill. The store is already causing a buzz. Greg Davis owns the store, calling it a dream come true. He says, vinyl records are making a come back and he is happy to share his love of music with others. Whether it’s trendy or it’s nostalgia, you are sure to find what you are looking for at Autumn Records. He also believes having a tangible item, really makes a difference. “You don’t really remember artists, or art work, or liner notes…”

Vegas music scene produces a pair of Route 91 benefit albums: The George Jones tune did what George Jones tunes do: Turn something sad into something else. It was a song by country’s music preeminent tear-in-my-beer balladeer that spurred Ronald Corso’s light bulb moment. In the aftermath of the Route 91 Harvest tragedy, the owner of downtown Las Vegas’ 11th Street Records and its National Southwestern Recording studio, where The Killers tracked some of their new album, sought to help out. He donated items from his store to various charity raffles and made a monetary commitment, but he wanted to do something more lasting.

Eric Teisberg’s Resale Records was a haven for a community of music lovers: “Just last Friday, I was in Resale Records and bought a record based on a recommendation from owner Eric Teisberg, as I have many times before: The Revolt of Emily Young, a ‘rock novella’ written by songwriters Buzz Cason and Pepper Martin, and performed by a (presumably) studio group called Foxx. When I asked him about it, he said it ‘was not awful for ‘60s bullshit. You should buy this one.’ As usual, he was right on: The album is exactly the sort of sunshine pop/psych weirdness I greatly enjoy. It is still a shock, and probably will be for some time to come, to consider I will never get his advice again…”

CBJ Q&A: Sidetracks Music owner Cal Glattfelder Jr.: “…We have a lot of repeat customers that come in a lot. It’s funny — a lot of musicians come in. I know a lot of the musicians in the community and they do come in quite a bit. It’s almost like a bar, in a way, where we talk about music. A gathering place, to talk about music they like. Or people will ask for recommendations. There are also a lot of people who collect vinyl or CDs that travel, and they look us up and find us when they come to Charlottesville…There are a whole lot of local musicians, and everybody in town in general appreciates live music and recorded music. There are many towns you couldn’t do this in — at this population, it wouldn’t work at all, but it works here. The university has a lot to do with that; open minds and talented people live around here.

Across China: Vinyl renaissance spreads to China: Although vinyl records long ago lost their battle with cassettes, CDs and online downloads, fans of the retro music format are seeing signs of a comeback in China. “During the past year or two, more and more young people have come to my record store and listened to and talked about vinyl. I’m so happy to see the trend,” said Jin Fangyong, 60, in the eastern Chinese city of Hangzhou. Jin, who has a collection of nearly 100,000 records, has also noticed a resurgence of vinyl at domestic music shows in recent years, where nearly every record company has dedicated a booth to vinyl. Industry insiders said the renewed interest in vinyl in China stems from its renaissance in Europe and America, which started years ago.

Changes overwhelm Tauranga’s music man: Changing times have finally caught up with the great survivor of Tauranga’s once mighty music retail scene, Lex Clay. The somewhat stoic but friendly character who inhabited Traks in Devonport Rd has closed the doors, leaving behind memories of an era all but gone in the downtown. “I’ve a lot of happy memories. My customers were down-to-earth sorts of people.” His 21 years meeting the demands of the fickle music market meant he became one of those retail rarities in the downtown – children who came in with their pocket money become loyal customers, and in time brought their children. “I’ve seen them come in aged eight or nine and now they’re pushing prams.”

My Bloody Valentine Announce Isn’t Anything and Loveless Vinyl Reissues, The long-promised remasters arrive early next year: My Bloody Valentine have officially announced “all analog vinyl versions” of the band’s first two albums, Isn’t Anything and Loveless. Kevin Shields first discussed the possibility of these versions in a 2013 interview with Pitchfork. Each record will be cut on a “180 gram vinyl album mastered from analog tapes using Studer A80 VU PRE and Neumann VMS 80 cutting lathe for full analog signal path,” and are out January 18, 2018. Pre-order your copies here. Recently, the website for Norður og Niður, Sigur Ros’ upcoming festival in Iceland, revealed that Shields is working on a new MBV record, slated for release in 2018. The hypothetical LP would be the follow-up to their 2013 comeback album m b v.

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  • SUPPORTING YOUR LOCAL INDIE SHOPS SINCE 2007


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