In rotation: 10/22/18

Kutztown, PA | Kutztown zoners delay decision on pizza shop’s move to current record-store location: Young Ones Records customers have garnered 2,700 signatures to stop Tommy Boy’s Pizza Cafe from getting a variance allowing it to purchase and move to the record store’s location. The Kutztown Zoning Hearing Board voted Wednesday night to continue a hearing for zoning relief that would allow Tommy Boy’s Pizza Cafe to move to a new location on Whiteoak Street. Attorney Alexander J. Elliker, representing restaurant owner Thomas Mathias, asked the board for a continuance until Nov. 7 because of an improper posting of the property… Young Ones Records currently occupies the Whiteoak Street building, and the record store’s customers are opposing the zoning relief; they’re upset that owner Chris Holt will be forced to find a new location should the pizza shop buy the building.

Nashville, TN | Fond Object to Close Downtown Location. Original location in Riverside Village to remain open. Bummer news in Nashville record retail: Roughly 18 months after much-loved East Nashville record and vintage shop Fond Object opened a second location on Fourth Avenue South, co-founder Jem Cohen tells the Scene that the downtown store will be closing up shop. “Downtown was an amazing opportunity, but I think it’s best to focus our attention to one location and a neighborhood that truly supports us,” Cohen says in an email. In addition to offering records, vintage clothing and other items for sale, the Fourth Avenue store has played host to notable shows including two enormous Record Store Day parties, a surprise set from Eagles of Death Metal, a tape release for locals Shell of a Shell and a phenomenal show from A Giant Dog. The East Side store’s backyard space continues to be an important community resource

Lubbock, TX | Terri Tells You – Josey Books & Records: New Book and Records Store Opens in Lubbock: Book and Record lovers, rejoice! There is a new store in Lubbock that offers new and used books and records along with collectibles. Store Manager, Stuart Spikes joined me in the studio to talk about the independent book store. The store originally opened up in Dallas and is now a popular store in that area. Owners then branched out to Kansas City, Tulsa and now here in Lubbock. In areas where Hastings closed down, Josey’s was an option for anyone who wanted to buy or sell books. In 2017, the business expanded to include records, DVD’s and collectibles. Now you can find anything you might be looking for at a reduced price…

Salt Lake City, UT | Through 40 years of highs and lows, Salt Lake’s Randy’s Records keeps spinning: When you talk to Randy Stinson, the conversation quickly turns to numbers. Some of those numbers are small: one to five (the number of dollars his music store, Randy’s Record Shop, used to charge for Led Zeppelin albums); 45 (the RPMs at which 7-inch vinyl singles are played); 60 (“I worked probably 60 hours a week for most of my life,” Stinson said); ’67-’69 (the years he was in Vietnam). Those numbers quickly skyrocket: 1989 (the year major record labels stopped printing new vinyls); 10,000 (the number of dollars he borrowed to open Randy’s Records in 1978); and more than 100,000 (the number of records he once owned). Another number sticks out: 40 — the years that Randy’s Record Shop has now been open.

Are retro Bush turntables worth buying? Bush is one of the most popular retro turntable brands, alongside rivals like GPO and ProJect. But do they have the sound quality to do your vinyls justice? [A reminder: The plural of vinyl is in fact, “vinyl.” You wouldn’t say “deers” would you? —Ed.] Share by email Retro and vintage-looking turntables have become increasingly popular since the vinyl revival – and as Bush is one of the biggest brands in this space, you might find yourself trying to choose between one of its turntables and a retro rival from another brand. We’ve rounded up some popular models to consider – but as sound quality can vary massively, you should do your homework before you buy. Retro turntables come in all shapes and sizes, from big wooden tabletop models, such as the Ion Superior LP, to suitcase-style models that you can carry from one room to another, such as the Crosley Cruiser and one of Bush’s most popular models – the Bush Classic Turntable (PHK-M41).

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