In rotation: 6/18/20

UK | ERA: First day’s trading ‘exceeds expectations’ for music retail: The Entertainment Retailers Association has reported a positive start for music retail after stores reopened on June 15. It follows almost three months when shops were shuttered during lockdown. As reported in the latest issue of Music Week, many indie retailers are still weighing up when to reopen. While some independents will find the current social distancing restrictions challenging, HMV and Rough Trade have reopened under the government’s Covid-19 guidelines. “The outpouring of affection for stores is clearly apparent with customers really pleased to see shops open and enthusiastically visiting their local shops, many arriving with lists of records they wanted to buy,” said ERA CEO Kim Bayley. “Most shops reported steady numbers throughout the day and the vast majority of shops have been very pleased with the trading in store so far. In many cases, this has exceeded their expectations for the first day’s trading.”

Edmonton, ON | For the record: Caution a big concern for Edmonton’s very hands-on vinyl music stores: We walk up to Revolver in Bonnie Doon, one of the few remaining in-mall record stores left in the city, hoping for a used vinyl fix. Customer capacity is already at the max six shoppers, and so — wearing the masks and gloves no one else is besides the worker at the till — my buddy and I wait maybe five minutes to get in, no biggie, then do. About a minute later, five people bust straight into the at-capacity store, are patiently told there’s a customer limit… then simply walk away instead of waiting. And that, in a nutshell, is a snapshot of life in a record store in phase two Edmonton, where in the space of a couple weeks we went from 45 to 175 active cases of COVID-19; no vaccine in sight; world-record infected numbers still reliably rising overall planet-wide. So, just to be clear, it’s a fickle balance: trying to keep customers and employees safe but also stay alive and in business.

Senator Thom Tillis Seems Really Pissed Off That The Internet Archive Bought A Record Store To Make Rare Recordings Accessible: Senator Thom Tillis (or perhaps some staffer in his office who is desperate for a job as a legacy copyright industry lobbyist in his next job) really seems to have it in for the Internet Archive. Beyond trying to rewrite copyright law to make it favor the legacy players even more than it already does, and beyond telling copyright experts that they shouldn’t even dare think of commenting on the state of copyright law today, Tillis really seems to have an infatuation with the Internet Archive wanting to help people by providing them information. I don’t know what the library ever did to Tillis as a child, but as a Senator he sure seems to hate the very concept. He sent one very confused, misinformed, and angry letter to the Internet Archive over its National Emergency Library, and now he’s sent another one after news broke that the Archive had purchased the distressed, but famed, Bop Street Records in Seattle.

Making Vinyl is hosting a free instructional webinar: Making Vinyl is hosting a free online event for anyone interested in record cutting. This 1-hour session will be fast-paced and will demystify the vinyl record cutting process. Get the customized answers to your specific situation to ensure high-quality pressings every time. When: Wednesday, June 24th @ 12 pm (New York) 5 pm (London) Scott Hull – Masterdisk, Margaret Luthar, Welcome to 1979, Clint Holley, Well Made Music, Greg Reierson, Rare Form Mastering & Noah Mintz, Laquer Channel Mastering. This event is free of charge but registration is required.

6 slick Bluetooth turntables to put a modern spin on your vinyl records: Buying a Bluetooth turntable? You’ll have plenty of choice, from brands like Cambridge Audio, Pro-Ject and Sony. Here’s how to pick the best Bluetooth record player for you… From the Walkman to the iPod, the music world has long been obsessed with technological advances, and job number one has always been increasing convenience and ease of access. So where does your classic rock vinyl fit into that? After all, vinyl is an outlier, a relic that’s stubbornly refused to bow to the ‘everything now’ culture, but Bluetooth turntables have changed all that. Essentially, Bluetooth is an old technology being put to fresh use, and a new breed of the best turntables are requisitioning this tech to shake up the vinyl market. Bluetooth turntables wirelessly sync to any speakers within range (around 30 feet) and operate your stereo remotely. They can also be used with the best headphones for private listening sessions. If that tickles your fancy, we’d also recommend you check out the best headphones for vinyl – these beauties are perfect for such use.

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  • SUPPORTING YOUR LOCAL INDIE SHOPS SINCE 2007


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