Author Archives: TVD

TVD’s Spring Vinyl Giveaways: Luke Rathborne’s Dog Years / I Can Be One Double EP

In the mere four years since twenty-two year old Luke Rathborne relocated to New York City from Brunswick, Maine, he’s earned the praises of Interview Magazine, NME, and BBC Radio 6 and been compared to a long list of legends including Elliott Smith, John Lennon, Tom Waits, Alex Chilton, Bob Dylan, and Lou Reed.

Rathborne has played with Devendra Banhart and opened for The Strokes at SXSW just last month right before the release of his new double EP Dog Years / I Can Be One. On the EP, he worked with members of Antony and the Johnsons, and since it is a beautiful, sunny, spring day here at TVD HQ in Washington, DC, we feel like giving one of you a copy.

 
The 12″ double EP is on 180 gram vinyl and includes digital downloads and L.A., a book of poems penned by Mr. Rathborne himself.

To win the double EP, simply tell us your favorite song from your favorite legendary singer. We know that in another four years, Rathborne could very well top that list.

The winner will be selected one week from now, on Monday, May 2nd, and must have a mailing address in the continental US or Canada.

Oh, and hey, New Yorkers: If you like what you hear, Luke Rathborne plays NYC’s Pianos tonight!

Posted in TVD New York City | 1 Comment

The TVD Preview Week: The First Annual Power Pop-A-Licious Festival!

TVD is stoked as you brats say, to be a media partner for the very first Power Pop-A-Licious Festival in Asbury Park, NJ, curated by our friend Paul Collins. Paul’s assembled a roster of 18 bone shaking power pop acts from points east and west who’ll converge on my old stomping ground for a weekend of songs destined to be lodged in your cranium for years to come.

All week TVD will be talking to a cross-sample of bands converging at the Jersey Shore for this event—but up first, a few words with Paul himself, courtesy of TVD Asbury Park’s Angie Sugrim:

The weather is finally warming up out here in AP, the City By The Sea, and that means that more fun than you’ll know what to do with is about to be unleashed upon the masses in our little Rock-N-Roll resort town.

The big kick off event signifying the beginning of the season this year is without a doubt the highly anticipated Power Pop-A-Licious Festival created and executed by Paul Collins of indie heroes The Beat and The Nerves, in conjunction with the area’s illustrious DIY institution The Asbury Lanes. I had a chance to find out a more about all the excitement to come from Paul and from what he’s shared with me, this is going to be a multi-dimensional festival that is a must-see-do-hear-be-there for anyone who gets a thrill when pick is put to string, stick is put to drum, and mouth is put to mic. Check it out, from the man himself!

TVD: What can fans expect when they come to the Power Pop-A-Licious Festival?

Paul Collins: Fans will be treated to some of the best up and coming power pop/punk pop/garage pop bands from all over the mid west, the south, the east coast, and from as far away as Montreal and Ottawa!

What vision did you want to create when you thought of this weekend- long Pop Spectacular?

I was touring all over the country playing with all these great new bands who I really enjoyed and I thought to myself, “Why dont we have a big festival and bring them all together?!” The whole process has been really great and the bands have been so supportive and co operative it has been amazing. For me this is a whole new slant on the DIY ethic which I have been doing most of my professional career as far back as my first band The Nerves.

My motto now is “By the People for the People!” We are all stars at this festival all the bands are really great musicians who take their music very seriously but they also have fun which is what rock n roll is all about. Power Pop is a great and vastly unappreciated genre and I for one am doing everything in my power to make it much more visible.

I was just hanging with my bandmates and we were contemplating how perfect songs like The Cars’ “Just What I Needed” are actually really some of rock’s masterpieces, but often those sort of gems don’t seem to get the credit that they’re due for being so perfect. So, how did you go about creating the Festival? How did you end up choosing The Asbury Lanes as the venue? It’s one of my all time favorite institutions ever, by the way.

I had done a show last year at The Lanes and I was so impressed with the club and especially (club management, the brilliant and beautiful) Jenn (Hampton) and Laney (Lanes) and the way they treat bands that it was the first and only place I thought of to do this event. They in turn were so enthusiastic right from the beginning, it was the perfect match.


I agree,  I don’t think you could have chosen a better venue to host this weekend! Like Jenn and Layney, you are incredibly passionate about music—what is your own background? Could you tell us a little about yourself as a promoter and musician?

Read More »

Posted in TVD New York City | Leave a comment

TVD Ticket Giveaway: The Dig in NYC, NJ, DC, or Chicago – you choose!

It’s OK if you’re mistaking The Dig for the hardest working band on the road at the moment. I often do.

I’ve also lost count of how many times TVD and the band have hung out together. Let’s see…there was The Dig Takeover Week last year, the dual Dig and The Joy Formidable shows…at least 3 or 4 ticket and vinyl giveaways too. So, while it’s easy to draw a pun from the band’s moniker, suffice it to say we’re fans.

But here’s a little Marketing 101 lesson—despite the band grinding it out on the road for well over a year now, it’s often not the first or the second or the third or 15th post that will make someone sit up and take notice—but say, the 16th post.

So – sweet 16 style – we’ve got a chance for a bunch of you to catch The Dig live and we’re putting a handful of the TVD cities to work.

Enter to win tickets to see The Dig:
April 20th – NYC, The Knitting Factory w/Local H
April 23th – NJ, The Brighton Bar w/Local H
April 24th – DC, The Rock and Roll Hotel w/Local H
May 3rd – Chicago, The Empty Bottle w/Oh No Oh My

The Dig | You’re Already Gone

Enter to win by leaving us a note in the comments to this post. Let us know why you want to see the band for the first time (and if you’ve seen them already, let us know why you’re up for more!) The most convincing of the bunch, per show, per city, will be the lucky recipient of the free tickets.

We’ve got two tickets for Wednesday’s show at The Knitting Factory and one pair of tickets for all the others. Make sure you specify which show in which city you’d like to attend with your comment. We’ll be choosing our winners at noon on the day of the shows so pay close attention your your email!

Catch The Dig streaming live Wednesday night (4/20) from the Knitting Factory right here!

Posted in TVD New York City | 4 Comments

Lunch With Candy Golde

The day after their ear splitting first ever live show together at Club Deville during SXSW, I had the pleasure of sitting down for lunch with new Chicago all star band, Candy Golde. Featuring Nick Tremulis (Nick Tremulis Orchestra), Rick Rizzo (Eleventh Dream Day), John Stirratt (Wilco, The Autumn Defense) and none other than Bun E Carlos (Cheap Trick) behind the drum kit, these heavy hitters delivered what you’d expect: great rock n’ roll music.

TVD Austin: So tell me, how did Candy Golde come about?

Rick Rizzo: Nick gave me a call and asked me if I’d write some songs with him. He had this idea of just writing songs with friends and I was the first one he called. They came together very quickly and we built it from there.

TVD Austin: How long ago was this?

Nick Tremulis: (sings mimicking the Mariachi singer at the table next to us) I think that was a year or so a-goooo!

RR: I’ve played with Bun E and John before and we all knew each other and it just seemed like a great band to have together and as long as we weren’t writing a bunch of bullshit, we said “yeah, let’s do it”.

Bun E Carlos: It’s all about the songs. If the songs weren’t any good, what’s the point of dragging our ass into doing it.

TVD Austin: You are releasing a five song EP in May. Any plans for a full length?

RR: EP’s are easy, full length’s are a pain in the ass.

TVD Austin: Then another EP perhaps?

NT: I wouldn’t mind it. It’s all about having the time.

Read More »

Posted in TVD Austin | Leave a comment

TVD Readers Poll Results: Your Favorite Record Store! Princeton Record Exchange

We asked. You commented, emailed, and tweeted, and we’ve tallied up the votes; now it’s time to congratulate the winners! We’re featuring your TOP FIVE record stores this week, one per day, as we impatiently await Record Store Day, Saturday, April 16th, 2011.

We celebrate the stores that make Record Store Day possible and the vinyl enthusiasts—namely you, dear readers—who love them. It’s been great reading your opinions! Count down to Record Store Day with us as we pay tribute to the record stores that make our lives richer every day.

We’re starting off the week with my own personal favorite, New Jersey’s Princeton Record Exchange, or Prex, to those in the know. This nationally-recognized gem is tucked away on a side street in historic Princeton’s beautiful downtown, just blocks away from the illustrious university. It is conveniently located about an hour from both New York City and Philadelphia.

Read More »

Posted in TVD New York City | Leave a comment

TVD’s Eleven Weeks of Vinyl Giveaways! Week 11… #2

Cue weekly mantra: As we’ve pointed out over the past few weeks (rather broken record-like) one of the happy coincidences of being The Record Store Day Blog For 2011 is that we’re afforded the opportunity to underscore one of our main themes—namely that vinyl is a contemporary medium which is thriving and more vital than it has been in some time—DJ’s, purists, and collectors notwithstanding.

So, to that end, we’ve spent the past ten weeks straight putting records into the hands of TVD readers as we’ve counted down to April 16, 2011—Record Store Day. It’s Week Eleven already, and to celebrate the fact that Record Store Day is almost upon us, we have giveaways for you every single day this week—sometimes more than one!

We start off the week with a bang: The Shit Robot Ultimate Vinyl Giveaway, a collection of three rare singles featuring DFA electro artist Shit Robot, who just finished up opening the farewell LCD Soundsystem shows at the end of March. [I am still teary thinking about this.]

This giveaway is in anticipation of Shit Robot’s release next week (4/18) of the “Losing My Patience” 12″ single, featuring vocals by Hot Chip’s Alexis Taylor and remixes by Hot Chip and the Unabombers, and it includes…

1. Shit Robot’s “Simple Things” 12″ single, including a remix by Todd Terje. “Originally hailing from Oslo, nu-disco edit-master Terje showcases his remix skills. His subtle yet deft touch here makes his “Simple Things” remix the lynchpin of any disco fanatic’s play list.”

2. Shit Robot’s “Take ‘Em Up (ft. Nancy Whang)” 12″ single, including remixes by Mark E Black and Marcus Marr, plus digital remixes from John Talabot and Michael Mayer. If you miss LCD as much as I already do, you’ll be heartened by “the interplay between Marcus ‘Shit Robot’ Lambkin’s loping synthesizer disco funk and Nancy Whang’s unflappable vocals.”

3. The Juan Maclean’s Scion A/V Remix Project, which includes the Shit Robot remix of “No Time.”

I’m going to make you work a little bit to win this special threesome.

Tell me why you are the biggest DFA fan boy or girl in the comments below, and the most convincing of the bunch will be selected one week from today.

Winners must have a mailing address in the continental US or Canada.

Posted in TVD New York City | 1 Comment

TVD First Date: Mozzy Green

“We are very proud to be releasing our debut EP ‘Robots’ on vinyl as part of RSD2011. The four-track EP was recorded especially with the side A/ side B vinyl format in mind. The record explores themes of solitude, mind control and living in a dystopian world.

Because of the vinyl format we decided to record four songs we felt would work together as conceptual piece of work. Robots and Dark Clouds of London make up side A and describes an external view of a manipulative and totalitarian world… where Side B includes the songs House of Make Believe and Sharks and this focus’ on a more internal, human perspective on emotions in respect to this. —Mozzy Green

Anna |  I remember the record player in the sitting room when I was growing up, we had our dad’s vinyl collection at our disposal so my brother and I would spend afternoons sat crossed legged in front of it leafing through the records and giggling as we negotiated putting the stylus on the record. The favourites were the Beatles ‘Abbey Road’ album and Alice Cooper’s ‘Love it to Death’. I loved learning exactly where your favourite bit of a song was and knowing which groove to go for. I love looking at the sleeve artwork as well, especially those covers that, each time you look you see something you hadn’t noticed before.

For all the technological advances since then, digital simply doesn’t compare to the sound of a well loved and well played record. When I went round to a friend’s to listen to the ‘Robots’ EP white label when it came through, it was a thoroughly different experience – it’s our first release on vinyl and there was something so physical and kind of romantic about it, not to mention the sound quality – it was a little emotional! Needless to say, I’m scouting around for a record player now.

Read More »

Posted in TVD Cleveland | Leave a comment

TVD Interviews Holy Ghost! On Their Debut Album, Tour with Cut Copy, and DFA Family

Photo Credit: Ruvan Wijesooriya

NYC natives Holy Ghost! have been keeping busy with remixing basically any band you’ve danced to lately (Cut Copy, Friendly Fires, Mark Ronson), DJ-ing across the globe, and now have their self-titled debut album come April 12th. Sticking to the DFA label’s brand of analog and electro-tinged disco-funk, Alex Frankel and Nick Millhiser are supporting their debut with a full band tour opening for Cut Copy, which brings them to sold-out shows at Terminal 5 this Friday (4/1) and Saturday (4/2), as well as a headlining show at Music Hall of Williamsburg on April 29th. Their new track “Wait & See” premiered earlier this week.

Nick Millhiser chats with TVD Contributor BQ Nguyen about their start, influences, and why his boss’ band, LCD Soundsystem, is the best.

Holy Ghost! | Wait & See

TVD: So you guys have 20 dates opening for Cut Copy between Europe and their North American tour; I assume you’ve been friends since they recorded In Ghost Colours at DFA with Tim Goldsworthy a few years ago.

NM: Yeah, they came to New York to do their last record with Tim, and I met them, I believe, on their first day in New York because they needed to borrow a drum set to use on their record. So I loaned Tim and them one of my kits. After that, with the Juan MacLean we did a pretty long tour in Australia opening for them and so we’ve gotten to know them pretty well over the years.

TVD: But your first live gig as a 4-piece band was just last May at Under 100 in NYC?

NM: Yep. Since then we were basically on tour up until early December and had a little break until recently. Although the past month has been pretty busy gearing up for the release of the record, and we spent a fair amount of time re-tinkering the live set.

Read More »

Posted in TVD New York City | 1 Comment

TVD First Date: Mozzy Green

“We are very proud to be releasing our debut EP ‘Robots’ on vinyl as part of RSD2011. The four-track EP was recorded especially with the side A/ side B vinyl format in mind. The record explores themes of solitude, mind control and living in a dystopian world.

Because of the vinyl format we decided to record four songs we felt would work together as conceptual piece of work. Robots and Dark Clouds of London make up side A and describes an external view of a manipulative and totalitarian world… where Side B includes the songs House of Make Believe and Sharks and this focus’ on a more internal, human perspective on emotions in respect to this. —Mozzy Green


Anna |  I remember the record player in the sitting room when I was growing up, we had our dad’s vinyl collection at our disposal so my brother and I would spend afternoons sat crossed legged in front of it leafing through the records and giggling as we negotiated putting the stylus on the record. The favourites were the Beatles ‘Abbey Road’ album and Alice Cooper’s ‘Love it to Death’. I loved learning exactly where your favourite bit of a song was and knowing which groove to go for. I love looking at the sleeve artwork as well, especially those covers that, each time you look you see something you hadn’t noticed before.

For all the technological advances since then, digital simply doesn’t compare to the sound of a well loved and well played record. When I went round to a friend’s to listen to the ‘Robots’ EP white label when it came through, it was a thoroughly different experience – it’s our first release on vinyl and there was something so physical and kind of romantic about it, not to mention the sound quality – it was a little emotional! Needless to say, I’m scouting around for a record player now.

Ryan |  Vinyl to me conjures up fairy stories, epic adventures, tales and music. I was always around it but I never owned any, so when my parents sold their collection a part of my childhood went with it. I discovered music for the first time through this medium, watched the stylus jump across the record, listened to bedtime stories and played with the rpm making chipmunks of it all… to my great satisfaction! At one point I dismantled the whole thing in a bid to find out just how it worked! I find it a tangible, satisfying, beautiful. I am proud to be involved.

Mozzy Green | Beware Of Billy’s Ghost by The Vinyl District

Ben |  Vinyl to me has always been that holy grail of a music format. When I was growing up it was a choice of tape or radio for walks/drives to school but when I got home it would be the record player that went straight on. My parents were both into The Beatles/David Bowie/Pink Floyd/ Mott The Hoople etc and luckily I’ve inherited a lot of these collections.

The biggest thing is the sound. For me you just can’t compare any other platform to vinyl. The crackles and pops and the warmth – the modern day digital formats that dominate todays market bear no comparison with glorious vinyl. The art work too. It’s heartbreaking that album artwork has been reduced to a tiny square thumbnail viewed on a computer screen.

We worked with a very good friend of ours, Leaf Vigurs on our record sleeve. For me it’s as important as the music and to see it displayed on a 12″ vinyl is a good thing! In this age of digital music where people can carry around their whole record collection in their pocket and where the art of a physical recording is dying a death, it feels good to realise a dream we have grown up with.

Mozzy Green Official | Facebook | Myspace

Posted in TVD New York City | Leave a comment

TVD Interviews Holy Ghost! On Their Debut Album, Tour with Cut Copy, and DFA Family

Photo Credit: Ruvan Wijesooriya

NYC natives Holy Ghost! have been keeping busy with remixing basically any band you’ve danced to lately (Cut Copy, Friendly Fires, Mark Ronson), DJ-ing across the globe, and now have their self-titled debut album come April 12th. Sticking to theDFA label’s brand of analog and electro-tinged disco-funk, Alex Frankel and Nick Millhiser are supporting their debut with a full band tour opening for Cut Copy, which brings them to Seattle on April 12th where they’ll play at the Showbox SoDo.  Their new track “Wait & See” recently premiered.

Nick Millhiser chats with TVD Contributor BQ Nguyen about their start, influences, and why his boss’ band, LCD Soundsystem, is the best.

Holy Ghost!Wait & See

TVD: So you guys have 20 dates opening for Cut Copy between Europe and their North American tour; I assume you’ve been friends since they recorded In Ghost Colours at DFA with Tim Goldsworthy a few years ago.

NM: Yeah, they came to New York to do their last record with Tim, and I met them, I believe, on their first day in New York because they needed to borrow a drum set to use on their record. So I loaned Tim and them one of my kits. After that, with theJuan MacLean we did a pretty long tour in Australia opening for them and so we’ve gotten to know them pretty well over the years.

TVD: But your first live gig as a 4-piece band was just last May at Under 100 in NYC?

NM: Yep. Since then we were basically on tour up until early December and had a little break until recently. Although the past month has been pretty busy gearing up for the release of the record, and we spent a fair amount of time re-tinkering the live set.

Read More »

Posted in TVD Seattle | Leave a comment

TVD Portland: My First Record with The Big Pauper

I really enjoyed reading this one and laughed out loud a couple of times, it is a great story. Enjoy! – Steph

When Drew McIntyre puts on his nom de musique Big Pauper, no genre is safe. Since taking on this guise, McIntyre has laid his unique stamp on downtempo, hip-hop, ambient, and experimental. He has even exhibited the chutzpah to grab the work of Beck and mash it up and remix it with even more head nodding grooves and swirls of sound. Big Pauper is geared up to release a brand new album on April 26th via Circle Into SquareRecords, entitled Beyond My Means.

I was the kind of kid growing up that was always scheming, stealing, wheeling & dealing. I was a conniving little devil and if you had old collectibles I was going to find a way to charm the sense out of you and jack your shit. It didn’t matter if it was a Civil War sword, Soupy Sales trading cards, or a Dick Nixon bobble head. If it was old and dusty it was about to be mine.

None of it was ever mine for long however. The novelty of ownership typically wore off quickly. Being the snot-nosed little entrepreneur I was I started setting up shop at community yard sales to make room for more useless collectibles. People seemed rather entertained to do business with a six year old and I was always happy to take their money.

Somewhere amidst my prepubescent capitalist ventures I discovered records. I’d see ‘em around at yard sales and was fascinated with the idea of there being so many of them to collect and listen to. We had a couple lying around the house, but they were all poor examples of what music should be. My grandparents’ place wasn’t much better, but there were always lots of other interesting things lying around to get my filthy mitts on. We had a medium-sized family on that side and when siblings would fly the coop they would leave their relics behind and forget about them for the decades to come. This is where I acquired what I hazily might consider one of my favorite first records.

While visiting my grandparents in the spring of 1990, I discovered a closet in my aunt’s old room I had yet to pillage. Under a pile of rotting yearbooks and a stack of half-painted canvases (that I remember also nabbing) I unearthed a batch of records that made my consumer sensibilities feverish and my musical curiosities erect. My aunt was the only one in the family, to my knowledge, awake in the sixties and her record collection elegantly reflected that. Atom Heart MotherSgt. PepperTheir Satanic Majesties RequestThe Millennium; it was all there! The same shit I listen to today even. My grandparents seemed happy to see some “junk” leaving the house so they graciously helped me load up the trunk of the car and away I went.

Amidst this hefty stack of abandoned wax, I discovered Mothermania: The Best of The Mothers of Invention. It is a record I revere as having completely flipped my world as a kiddo. I’m not sure what initially attracted me to it out of the bunch. Maybe it was the fact that the record was called Mothermania and there were a bunch of creepy middle aged men on the cover. Maybe it was the hilarious gatefold of mustaches or the advertisement for something ominously entitled “Uncle Meat: The Musical.” Whatever it was, it’s exterior did nothing to prepare me for what was actually on the record.

Mothermania was bizarre, absurd, vulgar and musically unlike anything I had heard up to that point. It sounded like a cross between Smiley Smile and a car crash. In fact I remember wondering why they didn’t sing “nice” like the Beach Boys. “Surfer Girl” aside I was fascinated by those demented male harmonies, all that silly vegetable talk and the dissonant calamity of kazoos, gongs and tape delays. I mean, “It Can’t Happen Here” is bat shit crazy! What do you even say to a track like that? Looking back on it, this record probably had a more profound effect on me then I realize, but if I remember correctly it was a love/hate relationship.

Like most kids, I had a deep fascination with poop, farts and fucking…anything forbidden or taboo, I had to be the playground expert. I think all this went down before I got in to R. Crumb and underground comix (the Fritz the Cat obsession was age eight) so I was still a little underdeveloped in the vast land of felching, butt plugs, and bondage. But the fascination was there.Mothermania had some nasty bits about it and this was initially an enthusiastic draw for me. But as my focus shifted past the words themselves and in to the intentions within the words I found myself confused and disturbed by the perverse world of human sexuality presented on Mothermania. Doing the nasty on the White House lawn with a 13 year old? Smothering your daughter with chocolate syrup and strapping her on? Is this what adults do?

I remember getting tired of this uncomfortable and useless sexual guilt I would get from listening to “Brown Shoes Don’t Make It” and I decided to destroy the record. I had this nasty soot-floor basement in my creepy two hundred year old Victorian home that was to be its burial ground. It was like the basement from The ‘Burbs, you just didn’t go down in that shit. I stood at the top of the basement steps with the lights turned off andMothermania in my hands. I took the record out of its sleeve and with every ounce of second grade angst I could muster up I chucked it in to the darkness.

I remember expecting an explosion or something. Maybe some sparks or at least a loud sound but there was no such luck. I turned on the basement lights, went downstairs and there it lay. It was filthy from the floor but to the dismay of my dainty little soot covered ego it lay unscathed. The “Idiot Bastard Son” was still there. “Hungry Freaks Daddy” was still hungry. Even “Plastic People” was still plastic. I left it down there at the foot of the stairs in defeat (thinking the basement monster might eat it) and discovered it a couple of months later mixed in with my parents’ Lionel Richie and Seals & Crofts records.

It found its way back in to my collection with a little time, experience and depravity. Strangely enough I still have it to this day and it remains in near mint condition. In fact, I just threw it on the turntable for the sake of writing this article and it still sounds terrific. I think I overreacted a bit with the toss down the stairs but listening to it again pleasantly reminded myself why I went through such a heavy Zappa phase. This record from start to finish is pure creative brilliance. It is a delicious ayahuasca soup of absurdity, social commentary and playful musicianship. Every rock icon in the sixties had their freak flag to fly but few chose to fly a flag made of prune skin, cream cheese and TV dinners.

 

Posted in TVD Seattle | Leave a comment

TVD Memphis My First Record: Matt Jordan of You Ain’t No Picasso

Matt Jordan of You Ain’t No Picasso was recently featured on TVD Memphis as he describes his history with records. I especially liked this one because I can personally relate as my relationship with vinyl started when I realized it was a good way of decorating my walls. I won’t even get into which records I chose…I guess you have to start somewhere? -Steph

My first record was Ted Leo and the Pharmacists’ Shake the Sheets. I’d been a fan of his since I first got to college, but 2005 gave me my first opportunity to see the rocker in person. I went to see a TL/Rx show with one of my good friends; we got there early and stayed up front. After the show, I wanted something big for Ted to sign so I picked up a vinyl copy of Shake the Sheets. To me, having him sign a record meant that there was some functionality — though at the time I didn’t have a record player — as well as something to get autographed. Ted took my sharpie and swiped a quick “Thanks! – TL” to end my night at Louisville’s Headliners’ Music Hall.

I couldn’t have been more thrilled with my purchase, but I wouldn’t be able to truly enjoy it for a few months. The signed record was merely decoration on my dorm shelf until I got a friend to drive me to a used record store on the edge of town. I picked up a portable record player and some used LPs (including aChuck Berry’s Greatest Hits and a Talking Heads “And She Was” 12” single) for around $100. Suddenly what had been previously used for decoration was now a source of crisp, clear music.

From there it was a whirlwind of cheap used records, cheap record players and doing a poor job of caring for both. Eventually I learned the importance of a decent system, how to care for vinyl and when to splurge on good records.

-Matt Jordan

Matt Jordan started the music blog You Ain’t No Picasso as a Freshman at the University of Kentucky in 2004. He has photographed for Rolling Stone, Spin, Pitchfork and Kentuckians for the Commonwealth. He works at CD Central, an independent record store in Lexington, where he spends his time encouraging people to buy the vinyl version instead.

 

Posted in TVD Seattle | 1 Comment

TVD’s Press Play

It’s our weekly Twitter #MusicMonday recap of the tracks from last week that the folks in the press offices and PR agencies want you to be hearing. We post you decide.

…and it’s a little light this week, most likely due to SXSW last week, methinks.

The Knocks – Can’t Hurry Love (feat. Alex Winston) (Mp3)
Adebisi Shank – Genki Shank (Mp3)
cirKus – Drug Of Choice (Mp3)
Echoes – Love Won’t Save You Now (Mp3)
German Error Message – We Arose (Mp3)
Heaven – Mountains Move (Mp3)
The Knocks – Dancing With The Dj (Campfire Acoustic Version) (Mp3)
The Wilderness of Manitoba – Orono Park (Edit) (Mp3)
Rainbow Arabia – Without You (Hard Mix Remix) (Mp3)

Posted in TVD New York City | Leave a comment

TVD Ticket Giveaway: Big Star’s Third/Sister Lovers Performed Live…

…by an All Star Collective featuring members of Teenage Fanclub, Big Star, R.E.M and more!

“…a Rosetta stone for a whole generation” —Peter Buck

Big Star’s third album, Third/Sister Lovers, has long been revered by artists and critics as one of the most influential albums ever produced. Written and recorded when the legendary 70s band was primarily a studio project consisting of Alex Chilton and Jody Stephens, the third album was never been performed in public with the original string and wind orchestrations. That changed in December 2010, when an all-star band unearthed the original scores, assembled an orchestra and performed Big Star’s Third at Cat’s Cradle in Carrboro, NC. Performers that night included Jody Stephens (Big Star),

Mike Mills (R.E.M.), Mitch Easter (Let’s Active), Chris Stamey (the dB’s) – the creative genesis they experienced prompted plans for a historic concert in New York City.

On March 26th, a mind-boggling array of indie rock all-stars will gather to perform Big Star’s Third at Mason Hall. Norman Blake (Teenage Fanclub), Mitch Easter (Let’s Active), Ira Kaplan (Yo La Tengo), Tift Merritt, Mike Mills (R.E.M.), Will Rigby (the dB’s), Matthew Sweet, Chris Stamey (the dB’s), Jody Stephens (Big Star) and M. Ward (She & Him) will be joined by The Lost in the Trees Orchestra with Jane Scarpantoni, Django Haskins (The Old Ceremony), Brett Harris, Sidney Dixon and Matt McMichaels to recreate the original scores and breathe life into a bittersweet album that has impacted generations of musicians. Some very special guests will be announced in the days to come.

As the evening unfolds, Chilton and Stephen’s musical ideas that were far ahead of their time 35 years ago will resonate in the hands of a collective of sympathetic, top-notch musicians. “We have been trying to create a concert piece that can have a life in years to come, trying to keep the spirit of the music and make it come across with the right emotions live,” Stamey told Indy Week. “There’s something about this record that connects with my generation, and apparently many generations.”

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TVD’s Press Play

It’s our weekly Twitter #MusicMonday recap of the tracks from last week that the folks in the press offices and PR agencies want you to be hearing. We post you decide.

Sorry No Ferrari – Ashar (Music For People Remix) (Mp3)
Harris Face – Escalator Romance (Mp3)
Life Bitter Soul – Oxygen (Mp3)
Grandpa Was a Lion – Dancer (Mp3)
The Lisps – Wear and Tear (Mp3)
We Were The States – Hot Waves (Mp3)
The Joy Formidable – Austere (Echoes Remix) (Mp3)
Foxes In Fiction – Teenage Dream (Katy Perry Cover) (Mp3)
Metronomy – The Look (Ghostpoet Remix) (Mp3)
NewVillager – Lighthouse (Mp3)
Ages and Ages – So So Freely (Mp3)
CALLmeKAT – Bug in a Web (Mp3)
Gypsy Treasures – Stray Dogs of Wroclaw (Mp3)
Electra – I Feel Love (Donna Summer Cover (Mp3)
Jeniferever – The Beat Of Our Own Blood (Mp3)
Dinosaur Bones – Royalty (Mp3)
Agnes Obel – Brother Sparrow (Mp3)
Jared Mees & The Grown Children – Limber Hearts (Mp3)
Braids – Lemonade (Lemonparty Bliss Out Landon Speers Remix) (Mp3)
The Gift – Made for You (Mp3)
Maritime – Paraphernalia (Mp3)
Thulebasen – Gate 5 (Mp3)
John Brodeur – Masterpiece (Mp3)
Moonlight Towers- Heat Lightning (Mp3)
Mountain Man – Play It Right Warm Ghost Remix (Mp3)
Afrobeta – Nighttime (Mp3)
Morning Claws-Slack Magic (Mp3)
The Wrong Words – Summer’s Gone (Mp3)

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