Category Archives: The TVD Storefront

TVD Radar: Blondie: “Heart of Glass” deluxe 12″ EP in stores 10/26

VIA PRESS RELEASE | The song that burst Blondie out of the streets of the Bowery to #1 on the charts, “Heart of Glass” was the pivotal moment in punk’s choreographed slamdance with the mainstream. Inspired by Kraftwerk and Giorgio Moroder, Blondie transformed their campy “Once I Had A Love” into a Roland-driven juggernaut and never looked back. Explored and exploded via six distinct versions remastered from the original analog tapes, the history of “Heart of Glass” is documented here in a copious essay and it’s art reimagined by noted American illustrator Shepard Fairey.

“‘Heart of Glass’ was one of the first songs Blondie wrote, but it was years before we recorded it properly,” guitarist and co-writer Chris Stein said. “We’d tried it as a ballad, as reggae, but it never quite worked. At that point, it had no title. We just called it ‘The Disco Song.'” “The Disco Song” needed to be sung in falsetto by a punk singer, introduced to a Roland drum machine, written and rewritten by a neurotic, genre-omnivorous guitarist, and ultimately produced by an Australian perfectionist. The “Heart of Glass” experiment was more ambitious than the song’s inventors could have known.

In 1974, Stein brought a germ of a song to his then-girlfriend and bandmate, Blondie’s irreverent lead singer Debbie Harry. “When Debbie and I were living in our top-floor apartment at 48 West 17th Street, I often messed around on a borrowed multitrack tape recorder,” Stein told Marc Myers of The Wall Street Journal. Harry free-associated her lyrics upon hearing the proto “Heart of Glass.” “I was just walking around the house, we were on the Bowery by then,” Harry recalled. “[I was] riffing on Da da da da da! Dah-dah dah-dah. Seeing what flowed out.” The song became a constant presence in the couple’s home, even in their bedroom. “I remember Chris lying on the bed strumming those chords endlessly,” she added. “Sometimes I had to fight for space on the bed-it was me or the guitar-but after a while I got my own bed and made up the lyrics. That’s how we wrote the song.”

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Graded on a Curve:
Grin, 1 + 1

What a trooper. Over the course of his long career–from his prodigal years with Neil Young to his sojourn with Grin to his ever-hopeful solo years to his tenure with Bruce Springsteen’s E Street Band–Nils Lofgren has shown flashes of greatness, but has never become the big solo star he might have been.

The 1970s in particular must have been tough on our rock ’n’ roll journeyman: good press and a fair amount of hype failed to translate to big sales, either for his band Grin or his much-ballyhooed solo endeavors. Like Graham Parker, Lofgren is the epitome of the bridegroom left waiting forever at the altar, and this despite his having produced some truly top-of-the-shelf music.

Take Grin’s 1972 LP 1 + 1. Having parlayed his tenure with Neil Young into a record deal, Nils formed the three-piece Grin, and on this their sophomore LP he put his formidable songwriting chops to good use in binary fashion, bequeathing us an album with a “Rockin’ Side” and a “Dreamy Side.”

Produced by Neil Young associate David Briggs, 1 +1 blends touches of power pop, country rock, hard rock, and good old orchestrated shlock, and if the shlock doesn’t work everything else hits home. The “Rockin’ Side” is a tour de force, highlighting as it does Lofgren’s ability to write terse, no-nonsense power pop and hard rock songs that will stick to your ribs; the “Dreamy Side,” while a tad more uneven (“Just a Poem” is an embarrassing misstep), demonstrates that he has a flair for the softer stuff as well.

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Graded on a Curve:
This Heat,
Made Available, Repeat / Metal, Live 80 – 81

Although sometimes fairly tagged as post-punk, the best way to describe UK groundbreakers This Heat is as experimental rock at its apex of quality. Comprised of multi-instrumentalists Charles Bullen and Gareth Williams and drum anchor Charles Hayward, they cut two albums and an EP across a six-year existence from 1976-’82, all of them masterful, and in early 2016, all reissued on wax by Modern Classic Recordings. But of course, there was more, and the same label’s fresh releases of Made Available, Repeat / Metal, and Live 80 – 81 complete a welcome return to vinyl for the 2006 6CD retrospective boxset Out of Cold Storage. This second installment is out now with distribution by Light in the Attic.

This Heat didn’t get a record out until 1979 (through the Piano label of Flying Lizard David Cunningham), but even decades hence, that self-titled debut continues to formulate visions in my mind’s eye of dropped jaws and of listeners at the time of its release (the few that bought it, anyway) asking themselves from whence this sound came. Naturally, This Heat didn’t just materialize out of thin air. Instead, the LP’s sound was developed in a dormant London factory building utilized as a practice space and studio (and dubbed Cold Storage by the band).

Folks who tuned in regularly to John Peel’s show in 1977 might’ve gotten a taste of what was in store, as This Heat recorded two sessions for the Brit DJ at the BBC’s Maida Vale Studios in March and October of that year, with the respective initial broadcasts in April and November. Those eight selections are the contents of Made Available, and if the early versions of well-known tracks are not as massively killing as what hit in ’79, they don’t miss by much, and the collection still shapes-up as quite a doozy.

That’s in part because half of the slate is unique to Made Available. Additionally, the whole articulates the group’s art-prog-kraut foundation a little more clearly, as the playing of clarinet in “Sitting” further underlines a fleeting affinity for/ similarity to free improv, and the chamber-collage abstraction of “Slither” highlights why they were included on the now legendary Nurse with Wound list.

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TVD Radar: The Cranberries, Everybody Else Is Doing It, So Why Can’t We? 25th anniversary box set in stores 10/19

VIA PRESS RELEASE | Last year, the 4 members of The Cranberries—Dolores O’Riordan, Noel Hogan, Mike Hogan, and Fergal Lawler—came together to plan a 25th Anniversary Box Set release of their debut album, and one of the definitive indie albums of all time, Everybody Else Is Doing It, So Why Can’t We?

Following her untimely death in January this year, the remaining band members have decided to go ahead with the 25th Anniversary Box Set, which is released on 19th October on UMC. Originally released on 12th March 1993, the album hit the No.1 spot in both the UK and Ireland and sold over 6 million copies worldwide. At the time Dolores remarked that the universal appeal of the Cranberries’ songs was based on her, “own life and experiences as a human being, how human beings treat each other.”

Rewind to the summer of 1985, when a lifelong friendship was blossoming between three boys—Fergal (14), Noel (13), and his younger brother Mike (12)—over a shared interest in breakdancing. Fergal would travel the short distance from Parteen, County Clare to Moyross, Limerick where Noel and Mike lived so they could practice their dance moves. Their enthusiasm for the dance movement gradually faded and after a while they began to listen to mainstream electro-pop artists like Nik Kershaw and Michael Jackson, and like many other teenagers before them, began to pay more attention to what was being played on the radio.

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Graded on a Curve: Kompakt, Total 18

In the grand scheme of things, the dependability of the Kompakt label’s annual compilation series Total is minute. However, from inside the state of affairs that is contemporary music, the quality of Total 18 is remarkable, and even more so when contracting the focus onto electronic sounds. That’s the area of Kompakt’s expertise, and this latest Total installment offers nearly 164 minutes in its digital iteration, almost all of them danceable. But the German imprint has those with a hankering for vinyl covered, as they’ve distilled the collection’s essence into a 2LP set (with a download card holding the whole kaboodle) that’s streamlining retains the aura of the maximal. Compiled by Michael Mayer, it’s out now.

In terms of reliability in the arts, downward slides into irrelevancy are the norm; far rarer is the perseverance of substance over not years but decades. This goes for creators, but also for those who release product to the public at large, and the unlikelihood is magnified somewhat when considering Kompakt’s Total series, as electronic music still often comes attached (if not so much as it once did) with expectations of the new, or if not that exactly, then freshness in execution.

If the Total modus operandi was dedicated to seeking out sheer newness in all its electronic forms, and in so doing traveling down avenues of increasing abstraction and/ or experimentation, or less ambitiously just making it the mission to remain at the cutting-edge of certain stylistic wrinkles in the wide-ranging sphere of electronic music, the main dangers would be faultiness in ambition alongside mere lapses of taste.

When the first Total compilation emerged in 1999, its content was considerably nearer to the electronic front line (and harnessed by a single compact disc, though also spread over four sides of wax as representative of Kompakt’s unflagging dedication to the format). As time has marched forward, the thrust of the series has settled into a representation of the lasting vigor of Cologne techno (which Kompakt did help pioneer) as they broadened the appeal to ears outside the floors of clubs (or impromptu gatherings/ parties), all while managing to keep the core demographic satisfied.

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We’re closed.

We’ve closed the shop for our annual summer break and the Labor Day holiday. While we’re away, why not fire up our free Record Store Locator app and visit one of your local indie record stores?

Perhaps there’s an interview, review, or feature you might have missed? Catch up and we’ll see you back here on Tuesday, 9/4.

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Demand it on Vinyl:
The Four Tops, The Complete ABC/Dunhill Singles in stores 10/5

If you stress it, they’ll press it.Ed.

VIA PRESS RELEASE | With 47 Pop hits and 52 R&B hits to their credit spanning nearly 25 years of recordings, The Four Tops are one of the greatest vocal groups in the history of pop music, hands down. But a big chunk of their hits, the ones they recorded for the ABC/Dunhill label, have been almost entirely unavailable in the CD era. This 2-CD collection from Real Gone Music answers the prayers of soul fans worldwide by presenting, for the first time ever on CD, all 33 rare single sides that the Tops recorded for the ABC/Dunhill label from 1972 through 1978.

Though The Four Tops (Renaldo “Obie” Benson, Abdul “Duke” Fakir, Lawrence Payton, and lead singer Levi Stubbs) had dominated the charts with their classic recordings for Motown in the ‘60s, when the label decided in 1972 to move to Los Angeles, the group, like many of their celebrated label-mates, felt it was time for a change. They thus signed with ABC Records’ Dunhill imprint and hooked up with producer Steve Barri (The Grass Roots) and songwriters Dennis Lambert and Brian Potter, who re-created their classic Motown sound on Top Ten hits like “Keeper of the Castle” and “Ain’t No Woman (Like the One I’ve Got).”

In all, The Tops recorded 17 A-sides (including a Spanish-language version of “Keeper of the Castle”) for ABC/Dunhill during their six years on the label, notching a total of 11 Billboard Pop hits and 15 R&B hits, but those original hit singles (and their even rarer B-sides) have been almost impossible to find on CD.

Why? Well, in a sad tale we’ve told before on our previous Dunhill singles collections featuring The Mamas and The Papas, Steppenwolf, and The Grass Roots, legend has it that label head Jay Lasker threw out the tapes, deeming them worthless. A few singles—those identical to the album versions—have leaked out on CD, but here is the breakdown: of the 33 tracks (the seven earliest mono, the rest stereo), 27 have never been available on CD in their correct single versions, and 13 songs have never appeared on CD in any version.

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Graded on a Curve:
Lynyrd Skynyrd,
Second Helping

We remember Lynyrd Skynyrd’s Ed King who passed away on Thursday, August 23 with a look back from our archives.Ed.

When people—and by people I mean people who can’t believe a person of reasonable intelligence could possibly like the rednecks in Lynyrd Skynyrd—ask me why I love the band, I always tell them the same thing. I tell them that Lynyrd Skynyrd was the best Southern rock band ever, Fight Club, a future meeting of Alcoholics Anonymous that was never held, and rock’s greatest tragedy all rolled into one. Of course it doesn’t convince them for all kinds of reasons, including Skynyrd’s prominent display of the Confederate battle flag, its contentious celebration of the state of Alabama and mock feud with Neil Young, “Free Bird”—you name it. Some people just love hating Lynyrd Skynyrd, and I wish I knew why.

I get the “Free Bird” bit—it’s long and goes on for a really long time and its been played to death on the radio—but as for the rest of it, I say phooey. I don’t believe—Stars and Bars and pro-Alabama song notwithstanding—that Lynyrd Skynyrd had a racist bone in its body, and people consistently fail to hear female back-up singers Clydie King, Merry Clayton, and Sherlie Matthews singing “Boo boo boo” after Ronnie Van Zant sings “In Birmingham they love the guv’nor” in “Sweet Home Alabama,” perhaps because they simply cannot conceive of a bunch of ignorant rednecks like Lynyrd Skynyrd possessing a sense of irony.

But I always thought Ronnie Van Zant was one highly intelligent guy, albeit rough around the edges and when intoxicated prone to punching people in the face and on occasion even attempting to push them out of airplanes in mid-flight. But I always found Ronnie’s foibles amusing, endearing even, and the fact is that when he wasn’t knocking Skynyrd keyboardist Billy Powell’s teeth out—twice—he was writing great and nuanced songs in the vein of Merle Haggard and Waylon Jennings, only set to a rock beat. And still he couldn’t win; the same people (Yankee hipsters all) who think loving Merle and Waylon proves their open-mindedness still despise Skynyrd. As Robert Christgau noted when MCA released the compilation Gold and Platinum in 1979, “It’s not fair, really–everybody who was dumb enough to dismiss them as another pack of redneck boogie freaks now gets to catch up.” But most of ‘em failed to catch up even then, and what is to be said about such adamant close-mindedness except their loss?

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Mikey Mike,
The TVD First Date

“I remember being a little kid and having this mahogany chest in my house that was full of vinyl and wondering why my parents still kept it around. It looked prehistoric to me.”

“It wasn’t until many years later, when I was in 9th grade, that I got heavy into sampling music and making beats that the world of vinyl came alive for me. Suddenly I was riffling through every left over record and yelling at my parents for getting rid of them!

You could sample from mp3s, but sound wise it was never even close. Vinyl just had a third dimension to it. It’s like when the needle drops you can feel the band there in the room with you. It gives you the feeling that your standing inside the music, not listening from the outside.

I still feel guilty to this day about the fact that I used to swap the good records into the cheap sleeves at the pawn shop. I used to take the good soul records and slide them into the Barbra Streisand sleeves and walk away with 30 dollars worth of good soul records for 5 dollars. Poor Barbra, her records were everywhere in pawn shops!

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Graded on a Curve:
Galaxie 500,
Today

You have to hand it to Boston’s Galaxie 500; they sure knew how to make a lot out of a little. First they made a fetish out of the third Velvet Underground album, then they proceeded to fashion an entire (if relatively short-lived) career paying tribute to it with their minor key but often thrilling dream pop.

Which is pretty amazing when you think about it. We all have our role models, but Dean Wareham (guitar, vocals), Naomi Yang (bass), and Damon Krukowski (drums) took slavish hero-worship to the V.U. about as far as you can without offering human sacrifices at an altar of Lou Reed.

But hey; if you happen to love 1969’s The Velvet Underground (and who doesn’t?), the band that took its name from a friend’s car is guaranteed to light up your pleasure receptors like a pachinko machine. Their droning (but often exhilarating) shoegaze has a way of colliding with your synapses and causing them to sizzle like bug zappers, and if you’re like me the result is a low-dose case of happy delirium.

On 1988 debut Today, Galaxie 500 established the blueprint for their entire career. Slow tempos, delicate melodies, lots of cool strumming and chiming guitar, a dependable drone–and let us not forget Wareham’s (and sometimes Wang’s) fey, tender, and almost tentative vocals. This is music that will break your heart, and not because it evokes heartbreak, terror, pity or any other recognizable human emotion. No, it will break your heart simply because it’s there.

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Graded on a Curve:
NRBQ,
All Hopped Up

Sound reads from the archives, all summer long.Ed.

The music of NRBQ is one of rock ‘n’ roll’s great paradoxical pleasures. How can a band this accessible and joyous be banished to the musical fringe? It’s a true stumper. But if widespread success was denied them, the group endured and excelled through relentless bar gigs, college radio play, and via the persistent word of mouth of the converted. Their early days found them hopping labels only to be dumped after disappointing sales, but instead of quitting they smartly decided to put out their own records. 1977’s All Hopped Up was the first, and for new listeners it makes a fine introduction.

Their name originally stood for the New Rhythm and Blues Quintet. Formed by guitarist Steve Ferguson, pianist Terry Adams, drummer Tom Staley, bassist Joey Spampinato (aka Jody St. Nicholas), and vocalist Frank Gadler, they combined a stylistic eclecticism—the titular R&B, rockabilly, early Brit-invasion pop, jazz, and even more into a highly potent and easily digestible brew. But if possessive of an unusual level of diversity, constant factors were also at play. Foremost was a lighthearted sincerity regarding the love of their shared influences, but NRBQ are also one of the least egocentric bands, both musically and in terms of personality, to ever span decades of neglect.

They came together in Florida but moved to New York City where they quickly gathered steam, even playing Fillmore East, and eventually found themselves signed to Columbia Records. This resulted in a truly swell self-titled debut in ’69 that didn’t sell squat. And that’s not really a surprise; if the Q’s long-term lack of a wide following is hard to fathom, in the year of Woodstock they weren’t exactly the height of trendiness. What to make of a group that covered Eddie Cochran, Sun Ra, Sonny Terry & Brownie McGhee, and Bobby Channel’s oldies station rotation warhorse “Hey Baby” all on the same album? The high number of covers alone was a little divergent from the era’s norm of boldfaced originality.

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TVD Radar: Making Vinyl Packaging Awards announces finalists in 12 categories

VIA PRESS RELEASE | The best in vinyl packaging will be recognized October 1, 2018, at the Making Vinyl Packaging Awards at the Westin Book Cadillac Detroit at Making Vinyl, the first B2B conference dedicated to the rebirth of the vinyl record manufacturing industry. In its second year, Making Vinyl will closely examine the circumstances leading up to the astounding comeback of a format deemed to be dead and forgotten less than 15 years ago is now regarded as physical media’s only shining star in the digital age.

The Making Vinyl Packaging Awards competition garnered 237 online submissions from both sides of the Atlantic, and were reviewed by a stellar jury of more than two-dozen award-winning judges in music design the U.S. and Europe the likes of Roger Dean (Yes) and several Grammy Packaging Award winners. The winners, who will be picked among the finalists below by a panel of judges at the New York offices of the prestigious design organization AIGA, will be announced at the awards ceremony on October 1 in Detroit.

Among the 12 categories are “They Said It Couldn’t Be Done,” recognizing innovation in vinyl packaging structural design; and “Best Record Store Day Vinyl,” recognizing the best limited-edition releases created for RSD 2018 in April and RSD Black Friday 2017. Record Store Day is a partner in Making Vinyl. “The awards competition recognizes the importance and critical role that compelling physical packaging plays in selling music,” says Bryan Ekus, president of Making Vinyl producer Colonial Purchasing Co-op, a raw material buying group of physical media manufacturers.

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TVD Radar: NRBQ, New single and All Hopped Up vinyl reissue in stores 10/26

VIA PRESS RELEASE | NRBQ’s new single, “April Showers,” is set for digital release by Omnivore Recordings in late September. The song will be featured in the new Dianne Dreyer film Change in the Air, which was scored by NRBQ’s Terry Adams and Bill Frisell and opens in theaters on October 16, 2018. The digital release includes two additional tracks to promote Omnivore’s reissue of All Hopped Up, which is due out October 26, 2018. The two bonus songs, live recordings of All Hopped Up’s “It Feels Good” and “Still in School,” time-travel back to that album’s original record-release party on April 23, 1977.

Omnivore Recordings will re-issue the 41-year-old All Hopped Up on CD and vinyl, faithful to its first release, with the same front and back artwork and with the original sequence. Both formats will include new liner notes from John DeAngelis and extra images, and the vinyl will be released with a deluxe gatefold jacket.

All Hopped Up, NRBQ’s fifth album, was an album of firsts. The quartet of Terry Adams, Joey Spampinato, Al Anderson, and Tom Ardolino — the line-up that would tour and record for two decades of the band’s 50+-year career — made its first recorded appearance here. All Hopped Up was the first on NRBQ’s own independent label, Red Rooster Records (which would go on to release such NRBQ classics as Kick Me Hard and Tiddlywinks, as well as the first-ever vinyl reissue of The Shaggs’ legendary Philosophy of the World). It was the first album to feature songs from guitarist Al Anderson, and the drumming of Tom Ardolino. It was also the first to include extensive contributions from the Whole Wheat Horns — Donn Adams on trombone and Keith Spring on saxophone.

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TVD Radar: Little Steven and the Disciples of Soul, Soulfire Live! 7-LP vinyl box set in stores 12/18

VIA PRESS RELEASE | A spectacular new live collection recorded last year in North America and Europe during the legendary rock ‘n’ roller’s first world tour in nearly two decades, Little Steven and the Disciples of Soul’s SOULFIRE LIVE! is available now via Little Steven Van Zandt’s Wicked Cool Records and UMe. The 3CD collection includes 24-tracks released digitally in April alongside an exclusive third disc highlighted by superstar guest performances recorded throughout the trek, including Bruce Springsteen, Richie Sambora, Peter Wolf, and Jerry Miller (of Moby Grape). Pre-order SOULFIRE LIVE! here.

Rolling Stone is premiering the live video of Little Steven’s performance of “Can I Get A Witness,” featuring Richie Sambora. Recorded last year at the famed Orpheum Theatre in Los Angeles, the video captures Little Steven and his 15-piece band, the Disciple of Soul’s, spirited and sweat-soaked shows which will be on full display on the Blu-Ray coming later this year. Fans can now pre-order ahead of their release later this year, SOULFIRE LIVE! as a unique 7LP vinyl box set and on Blu-Ray video exclusively at Little Steven’s just-launched new webstore. The vinyl box set will incorporate an exclusive bonus LP capturing Little Steven’s extraordinary surprise set at Liverpool’s legendary Cavern Club recorded November 2017 during his band’s sold out European tour.

The intimate lunchtime gig saw Little Steven and the Disciples of Soul paying tribute to The Beatles with rocking renditions of “Magical Mystery Tour,” “Good Morning, Good Morning,” “Got To Get You Into My Life,” and “All You Need Is Love,” alongside iconic songs famously performed by the nascent Fab Four, including “Boys” (originally by The Shirelles), “Slow Down” (by Larry Williams) and “Soldier Of Love” (first recorded by Arthur Alexander).

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Graded on a Curve:
Heino,
Mit Freundlichen Grüßen

The septuagenerian German superstar Heino has spent more than five decades doing the predictable–churning out mortifyingly maudlin Schlager and Volkmusik songs for sentimental German-speakers to sing and clap along with. He really has no American equivalent, although Neil Diamond at his very worst comes close.

Heino (aka Heinz Georg Kramm) is perhaps best known in English-speaking countries for his frightening album covers (google the cover of Liebe Mutter, I dare you), but in Germany his old-fashioned renditions of Schlager (it means “hit,” but these are most certainly not your idea of hits) and German folk songs make him much beloved, albeit mostly by the elderly and the kinds of folk sentimentalists who never miss out on a chance to break out the lederhosen.

Germany’s alternative-music loving young people, of course, consider him the enemy–the personification of backwards-looking nostalgia and the bane of anyone who has ever turned on German television only to be treated to a solid hour or two of sheer Schlager terror. But Heino had a surprise–or should we say a blitzkrieg?–up his sleeve. The platinum-haired, dark-glasses wearing Teuton may look like the epitome of a sinister Bond villain, but he has more in common with Liam Neeson’s character in Taken.

To wit, Heino has a particular set of skills, a set of skills he developed over a lifetime, and in 2013 he put them to hair-raising and nefarious use on the ironically titled Mit Freundlichen Grüßen (which translates as “With Best Wishes”), on which he covered songs by some of Germany’s most popular punk, industrial metal, and hip hop artists. It was a master stroke of agitprop by a man eager to take revenge on the people who despise him, as he made crystal clear in interviews where he expressed contempt for the very songs he was covering.

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  • SUPPORTING YOUR LOCAL INDIE SHOPS SINCE 2007


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