Category Archives: The TVD Record Store Club

Graded on a Curve: New in Stores, November 2017

Part one of the TVD Record Store Club’s look at the new and reissued wax presently in stores for November, 2017.

NEW RELEASE PICKS: Barry Altschul and the 3Dom Factor, Live in Kraków (Not Two) Altschul has drummed with Paul Bley, Andrew Hill, Sam Rivers, and with Anthony Braxton, Chick Corea and Dave Holland in Circle; his third release with bassist and fellow Braxton associate Joe Fonda and the young, masterful saxophonist Jon Irabagon is a start-to-finish delight. Monk’s “Ask Me Now” and an original paying tribute to three cornerstones of jazz rhythm cement the importance of earlier traditions, but it all launches from a ’60s small ensemble NYC avant-garde platform. They make a beautiful sound. A

Nona Hendryx & Gary Lucas, The World of Captain Beefheart (Knitting Factory) Not just anyone can successfully navigate the vast essence of Don Van Vliet, but this team-up, which began through participation in a live symphonic Beefheart trib in Amsterdam, handles the task with aplomb. Having assembled a small, sharp band, world-class guitarist (and former member of the Magic Band) Lucas is in typically fine form, and Hendryx, once of LaBelle and a noted solo artist, continually impresses; she’s crucial to relating the adaptability of the material, and handles the wilder moments like a champ. A-

REISSUE PICKS: Men & Volts, A Giraffe Is Listening to the Radio: Men & Volts Play Captain Beefheart (Feeding Tube) This terribly underrated band, featuring David Greenberger of Duplex Planet fame, sprang to life playing the music of Van Vliet to the exclusion of all else, but unless one was a clued-in Bostonian, this fact was essentially just lore. Until now. Consisting of practice tapes from ’79, the lo-fi aura never obscures how deep (How deep? WAY deep) they got into Beefheart’s thing. Indeed, this could be mistaken as a Captain boot, which means it never reverberates as a mere tribute. A-

Little Richard, Here’s Little Richard (Craft) Fats Domino has left us, but the other two greats of first-wave rock ‘n’ roll piano are still kicking, and their prime stuff can still demolish most contemporary competition. Going back to Little Richard’s first LP after a lengthy absence invariably reinforces it as even stronger than memories situate; that’s one reason we return to records instead of just remembering them. That Craft’s 2CD reissue offers previously unreleased material from the sessions for this historic and essential set is gobsmacking. Inquiries into the necessity of the extras will be taken as rhetorical. A+

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Graded on a Curve: New in Stores, October 2017

Part two of the TVD Record Store Club’s look at the new and reissued wax presently in stores for October, 2017. Part one can be found right here.

NEW RELEASE PICKS: Brooklyn Raga Massive, Terry Riley In C (Northern Spy) Rooted in Indian classical music, Brooklyn Raga Massive are, on this live recording, 18 members strong. Acting upon an idea by sitarist Neel Murgai, they engage with Riley’s minimalist cornerstone while simultaneously expanding the three-to-four musician Indian classical standard, an undertaking that makes them massive indeed as the results succeed resoundingly. Rhythmically infused and instrumentally vibrant, they deliver an interpretation of Riley’s open-scored work that’s unlike any I’ve previously heard. A joyful thing. A

Rudresh Mahanthappa’s Indo-Pak Coalition, Agrima (Self-released) Indio-Jazz fusion? Oh yes. But more so, a rich dialogue. Featuring Indian-American Mahanthappa on alto sax, Pakistani-American Rez Abassi on guitar and Anglo-American Dan Weiss on tabla, they debuted on record with 2008’s Apti. This set makes some considerable advances; Mahanthappa adds electronics to the equation, Abassi plays with more effects, and Weiss gets behind a drum kit. There is much exploration amid the intensity and flow, and the alto is consistently sharp. Available on 2LP, which isn’t the norm in contempo jazz terms. A

REISSUE PICKS: V/A, Andina: Huayno, Carnaval and Cumbia – The Sound of the Peruvian Andes 1968-1978 (Tiger’s Milk / Strut) The first of three compilations in Tiger’s Milk’s program to uncover Peruvian music past and present is consistently engaging and quite enlightening with wide stylistic range; there’s cumbia, huayno, big band, and traditional harp music, with the intention of label co-founder Martin Morales (also a Michelin-starred chef; this release coincides with a cookbook of the same name) to undercut the historical stereotypes of his home country’s music. He’s succeeded with flying colors. A

Blind Idiot God, Undertow (Indivisible Music) Originally out of St. Louis, the instrumental trio of guitarist Andy Hawkins, bassist Gabe Katz, and drummer Ted Epstein survived the late ’80s SST deluge and ended up on Enemy for this, their second album. Dividing their energies between bruising art-metal and thick dub, they defied the odds and made it work with the help of producer Bill Laswell. The LP holds up well, but the 45RPM bonus disc is the cherry on top, as “Purged Specimen” features John Zorn and two versions of “Freaked” (from the Alex Winter film) are solid collabs with vocalist Henry Rollins. A-

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Graded on a Curve: New in Stores, October 2017

Part one of the TVD Record Store Club’s look at the new and reissued wax presently in stores for October, 2017.

NEW RELEASE PICKS: Barbez with Velina Brown, For Those Who Came After: Songs of Resistance from the Spanish Civil War (Important) This gem pays tribute to the 2,800 Americans, known as the Abraham Lincoln Brigade, who traveled to Spain in the ’30s to fight the fascists during the Spanish Civil War. Through a large able cast with vocalist Brown prominently placed, the results are an emotionally stirring utter delight, as the crowd reactions verify. Featuring impressive audio for a live recording, the band is faultless, Brown is rousing, and the whole is an antidote for despair. A

Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith, The Kid (Western Vinyl) Quite often, concept records arrive hand-in-hand with a lessening of accessibility, an increase in rigor, or just plain expansiveness. The Kid musically examines four distinct stages of the human lifespan, and does so across four vinyl sides, but at 52 minutes is far from unwieldly, with Smith’s increased vocalizing making this a perfect place for the analog-synth curious to get their toes wet. But those having rode upon the Smith train for a while now need not worry, as the sonics not only remain rich but thrive in the varied landscape. A

REISSUE PICKS: Earl Hines, Tour de Force (ORG Music) Sometimes pianists can be so workaday in their rumination on standards that the listening experience fizzles out. For the most part, the ever-loving point of playing the chestnuts is to bring something new to the turntable, most commonly a personal stamp, and that’s just what Hines does on this date, cut solo in ’72 in NYC. Personal and intimate, with the pianist’s vocalizations audible in a non-obtrusive way, not only are these versions distinct from those of any other interpreter, but Hines’ technique is undiminished. Initially a Black Lion release. A

Acetone, 1992-2001 (Light in the Attic) Here’s a band that’s fully deserving of the reissue treatment. This L.A.-based trio put out two albums on Vernon Yard, the Virgin subsidiary that brought the world Low, and two on Neil Young’s Vapor label, but they’ve yet to work up a sizeable following. For that to change, all it’s going to take is a growing number of listeners getting bowled the fuck over by “Louise,” which is simply one of the finest third album Velvets takeoffs I’ve heard in many a moon. And for the clued-in handful, much of what’s here is previously unreleased. So, leisurely paced and revelatory all around. A

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Graded on a Curve: New in Stores, September 2017

Part two of the TVD Record Store Club’s look at the new and reissued wax presently in stores for September, 2017. Part one is here.

NEW RELEASE PICKS: Shilpa Ray, Door Girl (Northern Spy) Like many of the great New York records, Door Girl has few strong ’60s threads in its weave, an attribute that gives Ray’s songwriting a sense of timelessness. But she deviates from any kind of comfort zone through lyrical candor (detailing her time working the door at NYC bar Pianos) and beautifully risky stylistic jumps; “Revelations of a Stamp Monkey” is rap-rock that totally kills, and “EMT Police and the Fire Department” weds a post-Beat poetic scenario to a full-tilt punk blowout sans hitch. And jeepers creepers, what a set of pipes she’s got. A

Golden Retriever, Rotations (Thrill Jockey) If a plunge into a blend of kosmische, ambient, new age, and experimentation is what you’re desiring, then look no further than the Portland, OR-based duo of modular synth man Matt Carlson and bass clarinetist Jonathan Sielaff. For Rotations, they enlist a large crew of guests on assorted string instruments, French horn, flute, oboe, percussion, vibraphone, and pipe organ, and the sonically varied results are weightier and edgier than is the norm for this sort of outward-bound sprawl. Lift-off is certainly achieved, but parts of this get downright hectic. I dig. A

REISSUE PICKS: Slade, Slade Alive! (BMG) Rightly remembered for dishing out hits from the earthier side of the glam rock sphere, on the evenings documented by this killer live slab (19-21 October 1971), Slade were just as aptly tagged as good time hard rockers. As evidence, please consider the opening cover of Ten Years After’s “Hear Me Calling.” Harkening back to their days as Ambrose Slade, they were rock knowledgeable enough (and in retrospect, somewhat tasteful, even) to avoid boogying themselves into a hole in the ground, and could shift gears into John Sebastian’s “Darling Be Home Soon” quite nicely. A-

Mal Waldron, Mal/2 (Go Bop) Waldron cut over 100 albums as leader and nearly as many in the support slot. Forget about owning them all, but this early date from his ’50s run for Prestige, where he was house pianist at the time, is one for the shelf. In part for the personnel, which includes Coltrane, Jackie McLean, Sahib Shihab, Bill Hardman, Idrees Sulieman, Art Taylor, Ed Thigpen, and Julian Euell in an interchangeable sextet, though Waldron’s playing is splendid, and his three originals are sharp. The highlights are a fascinating “Don’t Explain” and a refreshing dive into “The Way You Look Tonight.” A-

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Graded on a Curve: New in Stores, September 2017

Part one of the TVD Record Store Club’s look at the new and reissued wax presently in stores for September, 2017.

NEW RELEASE PICKS: Daniel Levin, Living (Smeraldina-Rima) Levin is a NYC-based cellist tapping into a wide variety of New Music disciplines, with avant jazz a major component. Living is his second recording of solo improv, a difficult, and by extension, rare avenue of spontaneous expression. The prior disc, 2011’s Inner Landscape, was live, but this LP (in an edition of 300) was captured in studio, and it’s a perfect fit for home listening. Going far beyond standard bowing, he doesn’t create a racket but instead conjures quiet, focused intensity and surprise. It’s just one of four 2017 releases for Levin. A

Trio da Kali & Kronos Quartet, Ladilikan (World Circuit) Trio da Kali consist of vocalist Hawa Kassé Mady Diabate, bass ngoni player Mamadou Kouyaté, and balafon player and musical director Lassana Diabaté; described by World Circuit as a sort of Malian griot supergroup, their playing is exquisite, especially the balafon (a type of xylophone), and the singing is powerful, pretty, and expressive (and occasionally gospel-flavored). With the assistance of Jacob Garchik, who arranged Trio da Kali’s repertoire for this collaboration, Kronos inject elements of surprise and make a splendid thing even better. A

REISSUE PICKS: The Dream Syndicate, The Complete Live at Raji’s (Run Out Groove) The reunion set from this foundational Paisley Underground band is freshly out and more than up to snuff, but this reissue (first time on vinyl for the entire show) is an absolute monster. Captured on the last day of January 1988, this is the Ghost Stories lineup (2/3rds of which are back for the new LP) a little prior to that album’s recording, with the track-list focusing on the first three Syndicate records. The whole band is killing it, and Wynn’s guitar tone is blazing throughout, especially on sides three and four. A

Group Home, Livin’ Proof (Get on Down) The duo of Lil’ Dap and Melachi the Nutcracker were part of the Gang Starr Foundation, which in ’90s hip hop terms is a sure sign of quality. Produced by DJ Premier (with a track a piece by Guru and Big Jaz), this ’95 debut is rhythmically intense yet complex and loaded with samples (in the manner of so much New York hip hop of the era), with the numerous instrumental interludes a highlight, but the MCs are far from overshadowed. Possessing contrasting styles, Lil’ Dap wields a distinctive lisp and Melachi brings the comparatively straightforward firepower. A-

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Graded on a Curve: New in Stores, August 2017

Part two of the TVD Record Store Club’s look at the new and reissued wax presently in stores for August, 2017. Part one is here.

NEW RELEASE PICKS: Nadia Sirota, Tessellatum 2 (Bedroom Community) On occasion, the impulse to combine experimental sounds with visuals (often of a likeminded nature) smacks of a covert attempt to quell boredom. However, when the union is inspired it can be sublime. Such is the case here. Featuring Sirota on violas and Liam Byrne on viola da gamba playing a composition by Donnacha Dennehy, the accompanying animated film by Steven Mertens (available as a download with the LP/ CD) enhances an already full-bodied sonic tableau; think modern classical with elements of drone. Superb. A

Rob Noyes, The Feudal Spirit (Poon Village) A stunning solo 6 and 12-string guitar debut (in an edition of 330 with a Raymond Pettibon cover), aptly tagged as post-Takoma school (Glenn Jones is a vocal proponent) but with broader folk-blues reach (lines of descent have been drawn from John Renbourn, Davey Graham, Wizz Jones, and Michael Chapman) and a level of intensity setting him apart from the ever-increasing contempo fingerpicking hoards. Noyes has a background in loud post-HC rock (e.g. Bloody Gears), but his playing, often aggressive and fast, evinces no traces of the recent covert. A

REISSUE PICKS: Pharoah Sanders, Izipho Zam (My Gifts) (Everland) This sometimes gets tagged as spiritual jazz, and opener “Prince of Peace” (with vocalist Leon Thomas and his ultra-cool yodel) reinforces the observation; more so, the LP was originally on Strata East. But stretches of “Balance” and the 29-minute title track (amidst more yodeling) offer some of the wildest large group free jazz ever recorded. The lineup is wide-ranging, including out-jazz mainstays Sonny Sharrock on guitar and Sirone on bass, but also Sonny Fortune on alto, Howard Johnson on tuba, and Billy Hart on drums. A doozy. A

Jerry Garcia, S/T (ATO) Amir Bar-Lev’s recent film Long Strange Trip is something of a music doc rarity, in that it’s an utter treat for serious Deadheads and more casual fans alike, and it reasserted my love for the band. It also deepened the fresh listen I gave to Garcia’s ’72 solo debut, a record I’ve long dug, but probably never more than right now. Stripped back to just a multi-tasking Jerry, drummer Bill Kreutzmann and some of Robert Hunter’s best lyrics, the first side of this, peaking with the majestic “Sugaree,” is faultless. Some bag on the experimentation opening the flip, but it bothers me not a bit. A

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Graded on a Curve: New in Stores, August 2017

Part one of the TVD Record Store Club’s look at the new and reissued wax presently in stores for August, 2017.

NEW RELEASE PICKS: Ben Frost, “Threshold of Faith” (Mute) When it comes to post-industrial experimental soundscapes, Reykjavik-based Australian-native Frost consistently delivers the goods, and more; in 2013, he directed a musical-stage adaptation of Iain Banks’ novel The Wasp Factory. This EP documents a visit to Steve Albini’s place in Chicago, a meeting that resulted in over two hours of music. The opening title track comes on strong with booming thud-pulse enveloped in electronic haze, but the whole expands into less aggressive, at times even placid terrain. More from these sessions, please. A-

Brian Landrus Orchestra, Generations (BlueLand) Baritone sax/ low woodwind specialist, bandleader and composer Landrus is openly influenced by a wide variety of non-jazz, from Motown to Zep to Michael Jackson to J Dilla, but he’s anything but a pastiche-happy crossover hack. As the baritone chair in the Gil Evans Project, he’s absorbed some big band sensitivity from that endeavor’s namesake and loaded his orchestral debut (after a batch of smaller group outings) with some major names, amongst them vet drummer Billy Hart, trumpeter Ralph Alessi, and harpist Brandee Younger. Utterly non-stale. A-

REISSUE PICKS: Univers Zero, Heresie (Sub Rosa) Intensely dark second LP from a Belgian unit sometimes synopsized as chamber prog and further explained by a connection to Rock in Opposition. The term gothic is also occasionally employed, but don’t get the wrong idea; their inclusion on the Nurse with Wound list should relate the degree of seriousness at work here. The closest prog antecedents are Magma and to a lesser extent Crimson, though with this album they moved even farther afield of rock. This set features the 2010 remix issued by Cuneiform sans the bonus track “Chaos Hermetique.” A

Lejsovka & Freund, Music for Small Ensemble & Computer (MIE Music) The title might suggest the lab-coat-clad sternness of the avant-garde electronic days of yore and its occasional overlap with 20th century classical, but no. Keith Freund describes part of what he’s up to with Linda Lejsovka as “DIY shitty classical” but I’d never be so gauche. The small ensemble action here is modernist but warm, and the computerized elements serve a wide purpose, from varying degrees of enhancement to non-hostile disruption. This 500 count 2LP reissues the prior Mold on Canvas and Lethal Strategies. A-

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Graded on a Curve: New in Stores, July 2017

Part two of the TVD Record Store Club’s look at the new and reissued wax presently in stores for July, 2017. Part one is here.

NEW RELEASE PICKS: Anton Kubikov, Whatness (Kompakt) Some may know Kubikov as half (alongside Maxim Milyutenko) of Russian techno-house act SCSI-9; amongst other output, they released a pair of full-lengths for Kompakt in ’06 and ’08. Kubikov has also contributed to three of the label’s Pop Ambient compilations, and folks attuned to the gist of that series are likely to be pleased by Whatness, as “April” from the 2016 installment gets a reprise here. Where a fair amount of this style displays traces of a dancefloor past, Kubikov strives for and succeeds in attaining a full-on 64-minute ambient landscape. A-

Tunabunny, PCP Presents Alice In Wonderland Jr (HHBTM) Too many bands make a hasty retreat for safe climes after stepping out onto an experimental plateau, but in a sweet twist, Athens, GA vets Tunabunny appear fully comfortable extending the sonic ventures undertaken on their prior effort Kingdom Technology. Extending and honing; this new one is 28 tracks totaling nearly 75 minutes, and while it surely has its share of tangents, the overall cohesion raises the intensity. Plus, many of the songs hit the level of the strongest stuff on Genius Fatigue; by a nose, this feels like the band’s best full-length. A-

REISSUE PICKS: Fairport Convention, Liege and Lief (A&M) I can’t imagine it’d be that difficult to find a clean-playing used copy of this for a moderate amount of dough, but then again, it’s a stone classic and I’m not letting go of my copy any time soon. I’m not parting way with the group’s three prior efforts either, but to these ears this is not just Fairport at their peak, it’s arguably Brit folk-rock’s shining moment. The turn away from US influence toward homegrown traditions is in full flower, as is Sandy Denny’s voice. “Maddy Groves” and “Medley: The Lark in the Morning” slay me every time. A+

Link Wray, S/T (Future Days) Any reissue of this classic is cause for cheers. Released in ’71, the contents of this comeback (which kicked-off a cool four-LP run) apparently received a lowkey response from Wray’s fanbase, but that’s because he wasn’t into peddling variations on his (admittedly classic) early instrumental rock singles. Instead, this stripped-down mix of roots, recorded by his bro Vernon and Steve Verroca in Vernon’s Accokeek, MD Shack Three Track, predates Americana by a long stretch and through comfort with assorted styles (importantly, including blues) betters most of it. A-

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Graded on a Curve: New in Stores, July 2017

Part one of the TVD Record Store Club’s look at the new and reissued wax presently in stores for July, 2017.

NEW RELEASE PICKS: James Ilgenfritz, Origami Cosmos (Infrequent Seams) Double bassist, improviser, and composer Ilgenfritz has a loaded résumé; recordings include a disc of Anthony Braxton compositions for Infrequent Seams and an opera inspired by William Burroughs for Con D’or, the label of Hüsker Dü’s Grant Hart. This set gathers four pieces by Ilgenfritz’s fellow New Yorkers Annie Gosfield, Miya Masaoka, JG Thirlwell, and Elliott Sharp, all written with his formidable skills on the bass in mind. The results are consistently gripping but ordered so that Sharp’s “Aletheia” delivers the closing jaw-dropper. A

Aruán Ortiz, Cub(an)ism (Intakt) Hidden Voices, the 2016 disc by Ortiz’ trio (featuring bassist Eric Revis and drummer Gerald Cleaver) is a sweet bit of business, but this helping of solo piano is even more worthwhile, in part for how it blends and intertwines modernity and tradition. Based upon four tracks from his ’96 debut Impresión Tropical, he’s made a considerable progression. 20 years ago, Ortiz’s fleet hands engaged with melody and the expectations of a solo piano record much more directly; here, abstraction is a constant and thoroughly satisfying thread. The use of quiet and space is striking. A

REISSUE PICKS: Lynn Castle, Rose Colored Corner (Light in the Attic) Of all the artists snagged in the ill-fated web of Lee Hazlewood’s LHI label, Castle just might be the most talented. There are hints of this in her ’67 single for the venture, “The Lady Barber” (indeed, clipping male wigs was her vocation) b/w the track titling this collection, but it’s the ten previously unreleased songs here, cut solo with Jack Nitzsche at the console, that illuminate Castle’s talent as a singer-songwriter. Had she made a pro recording with Nitzsche or another sympathetic producer, the results could’ve blown some minds. A-

Billy Stoner, S/T (Team Love) Fans of ’70s outlaw country should check out this rescued item, recorded in Longview Farm in N. Brookfield, MA 37 years ago but left in the can until now. The outlaw descriptor runs quite deep; Stoner’s musical sensibility was shaped in Austin, where he began serving time in federal prison for a marijuana bust shortly after this LP was cut, and across its nine songs the man and a crack band (namely Arlo Guthrie’s backing group Shenandoah and singer Jemima James) combine honky-tonk with touches of rock, folk, and Texas singer-songwriter verve to accomplished effect. A-

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Graded on a Curve: New in Stores, June 2017

Part two of the TVD Record Store Club’s look at the new and reissued wax presently in stores for June, 2017. Part one for June is here.

NEW RELEASE PICKS: Dominique Eade and Ran Blake, Town and Country (Sunnyside) Pianist Blake excels at one-on-one interaction with vocalists, e.g. his indispensable ’62 LP with Jeanne Lee. Here, he engages in dialogue with brilliant chance-taker Eade on a wide variety of songs, from standards to folk to two selections by Walter Schumann for Charles Laughton’s noir masterpiece The Night of the Hunter to Nelson Riddle’s theme to Route 66. “It’s Alright, Ma (I’m Only Bleeding)” sounds like Anita O’Day flipped for Bob back in ’65 and decided to transform the song with the assistance of…Ran Blake. How cool. A

V/A, Typical Girls Volume 2 (Emotional Response) This continues the admirable international focus of the first set and with no drop off in quality. Beginning with jagged art-racket-rant by Aussies Bent and swiftly and sweetly shifting gears into the charging melodic punk of Oakland’s Midnite Snaxxx, there’s also edgy wavy stuff (Madrid’s Juanita y Los Feos, California’s Cold Beat), stomp-throttle (Cali’s Neighborhood Brats), more art-squall (Oakland’s Naked Lights), solid post-punk (Berlin’s Levitations), and more including Aussies Suss Cunts (see below) and UK vets Skinny Girl Diet. A remedy for power imbalance. A-

REISSUE PICKS: Tony Conrad, Ten Years Alive on the Infinite Plain (Superior Viaduct) Some know Conrad through his connection to The Velvet Underground, others are familiar with his work with Krautrockers Faust, and abstract film nuts might be hip to The Flicker. This 2LP/ 2CD set, consisting of one remarkable 88-minute piece featuring Conrad on violin, Rhys Chatham on the Long String Drone (a homemade instrument of wood, metal, bass strings, an electric pickup, tape and rubber bands), and Laurie Spiegel on bass, now sits at the top of this too often overlooked avant-gardist’s already potent discography. A+

Game Theory, 2 Steps from the Middle Ages (Omnivore) It’s common for the final album in a band’s reissue cycle to be one for the die-hards, but across their ’82-’90 existence Game Theory never put out a bad record. More to the point, once Scott Miller and company attained greatness the albums largely maintained that standard. Because this is a somewhat streamlined affair compared to Lolita Nation, I’ve heard some put it down, but listening to it in 2017, I have no fucking clue what those people are talking about. Listen up and get a grip; this is guitar pop for the ages. A-

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