The TVD Record Store Club

Graded on a Curve: New in Stores for October 2019, Part Two

Part two of the TVD Record Store Club’s look at the new and reissued releases presently in stores for October, 2019. Part one is here.

NEW RELEASE PICKS: Sarah Pagé, Dose Curves (Backward Music) Harpists aren’t as rare on the scene as they used to be, but theirs is still a fairly uncommon instrument. Some may know Montreal resident Pagé for her playing in The Barr Brothers, who are described as both rootsy and indie folky, but Dose Curves is my intro to her work, and it’s a wide-ranging treat for adventurous ears. There’s certainly an abundance of plucked beauty passages (e.g. closer “Pleiades”), but the opening title-track is reminiscent of cello or viola in an avant context, while “Lithium Taper” uses her homemade pickups and pedal setup to cultivate an appealing ambient field. Notably, the entire LP (in an edition of 222 copies, most of them already purchased) is one unaltered performance, and it delivers a major artistic statement. A

REISSUE/ARCHIVAL PICKS: Booker T & the MG’s, The Complete Stax Singles Vol. 1 (1962-1967) (Real Gone) Starting with that instrumental R&B cornerstone “Green Onions” and then rolling through 28 more sides up to “Silver Bells,” the flip to their ’67 Xmas 45, this is a smart way to amass this band’s prime work on either CD or 2LP. Featuring Booker T. Jones on Hammond, Steve Cropper on guitar, Al Jackson, Jr. on drums, and either Lewie Steinberg (early) or Donald “Duck” Dunn (joining in 1965) on bass, theirs is one of the most distinctive sounds in the genre, often imitated but never duplicated, partly because others struggled to attain the appropriate measure of tight and lithe. As Stax’s house band, this is only part of their story, but these chapters are essential, all taken from mono sources. A

Gary Numan, Replicas – The First Recordings & The Pleasure Principle – The First Recordings (Beggars Arkive) To commemorate the 40th anniversary of these two seminal and groundbreaking post-punk electronic pop-rock albums, Beggars is issuing the early recordings of both on 2CD and 2LP, Replicas (co-credited to Tubeway Army) on sage green wax and The Pleasure Principle on orange. Note that neither set includes the actual released albums, so if you don’t have those, you still need ‘em. And anyone interested in the abovementioned styles does need ‘em (they were both reissued by Beggars in 2015). With this said, it’s difficult for me to rate either of these sets as must-haves, but they are both wholly worthwhile documentations of works in progress. If you love the finished LPs, you’ll probably want ‘em.

That each set includes a Peel Session does substantially increase the value, though both have been previously released on wax. Plus, Numan was creating rapidly in this era, and these collections magnify his development (leaving Tubeway Army behind in the process) without getting bogged down with the ephemeral. These ears retain a special affection for the Replicas material, mainly because there are still traces of the band’s punk beginnings in an overall attack that’s sharply focused on the future, but it’s Pleasure that captures him in full flower, and this dive into its gestation wafts a pretty sweet aroma. It should also be mentioned that the 2CDs offer extra stuff, in the case of Replicas just a third early version of the title track, but Pleasure has six (and six unreleased cuts, two of which are on the wax). B+/ B+

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A morning mix of news for the vinyl inclined

In rotation: 10/10/19

Dublin, IE | Vinyl festival returns to Dun Laoghaire: Dun Laoghaire will be the home of The Vinyl Festival for the second year in a row. The event host a collection of talks, panels, DJ sets and live performances which celebrate the importance of music and the vinyl record. The line-up of special guests include Horslips, Vicky McClure (Line of Duty/This is England), Liam O’Maonlai (Hothouse Flowers), Noel Hogan (Cranberries), Mary Coughlan, radio presenters Dave Fanning and Tom Dunne, and many more. 43 years on from recording their Horslips Live album in Dún Laoghaire’s old Pavilion, Johnny Fean, Barry Devlin and Jim Lockhart from the band are coming back to the town for two concerts as part of the festival. They will play two nights on November 1 and 2 in the Pavilion Theatre. Liam O’Maonlaí will discuss the writing and recording of Hothouse Flowers’ 1988 debut album, People and will play a few live tracks on piano as well as a couple on vinyl.

Sacramento, CA | Record Spinners: The History and Closure of Dimple Records: John Radakovitz stands in front of a makeshift assembly line in the back warehouse of Dimple Records in Roseville in July. One by one, he picks up a record, places it gently in a sleeve, affixes an orange price sticker to the front and sets it aside. Music has been at the core of John’s entire adult life. He’s made a career of trading tonal poetry captured on vinyl, then magnetic tape, then polycarbonate plastic disks — and somehow, in this era where millions of people lease music encoded as zeroes and ones, the company he cofounded more than four decades ago is still going strong. People still walk into his seven stores scattered throughout the Sacramento area, and they’re buying music, movies, video games and books, both new and used. But John knows many people are walking into his stores for what could be their last time

Guided by Voices throwing ‘Sweating the Plague’ listening parties: Guided by Voices‘ are gearing up to release Sweating the Plague in a few weeks — it’s the band’s 29th album and third this year. Robert Pollard’s well of anthemic, ultra-catchy rock songs has not run dry, as evidenced by “Unfun Glitz” which premieres in this post. Listen below. Sweating The Plague will be released on streaming services on November 1, but will be available in stores a week early, with listening parties happening in 17 independent record stores across four countries on Thursday, October 24 at 6 PM local time. Purchasers on that day will get a commemorative poster, and each store will be giving away a Sweating The Plague test pressing autographed by Robert Pollard. In North America, there are listening parties in Minneapolis, Nashville, Portland, Boston, Cincinnati, St. Louis, Dayton, Brooklyn (Rough Trade), Toronto, Seattle and Austin. All listening party locations are listed below.

Hartlepool, UK | Rare signed The Jam album up for grabs at Hartlepool charity music event: Music fans can win a rare album signed by all three members of The Jam and help raise money for two worthwhile causes at an upcoming event. Hartlepool DJ David Halcrow, his wife Tracey and Hartlepool March of the Mods organiser Kev McGuire are staging a day of music and fundraising at the Corporation Sports and Social Club in Whitby Street. It takes place on Saturday, November 2, from 2pm until late and will feature a mix of top local live bands, DJ sets, food and raffles. The main raffle prize is a rare three record vinyl album by The Jam autographed by Paul Weller, Rick Buckler and Bruce Foxton. The day is raising money for the Chemotherapy Unit at the University Hospital of Hartlepool and 12-year-old Grace Measor from Seaton Carew who has been undergoing treatment for leukaemia.

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TVD Washington, DC

TVD Live: Luna at the 9:30 Club, 10/5

On the various Luna tours the band has launched since it reunited in 2015 following a 10 year pause, they almost seemed miffed to have to play the old stuff fans wanted. Not that they had much new material— just an album of covers and another of instrumentals.

But now, embarked on one of those full album recitals popular with heritage groups, they seemed to have turned the corner into appreciating anew all that they accomplished. The showcase for an early show at the 9:30 Club in Washington Saturday was the 1995 album Penthouse from start to finish—though some stops have been showcasing the two prior albums, Lunapark and Bewitched, in their entirety.

But Penthouse might have been the best of the three to see, featuring the band at its prime, with a lazy surf-like riff to start with “Chinatown,” then the wavy, underwater-like figure on “Sideshow by the Seashore.” It wasn’t quite the lineup the band had when it recorded the album 24 years ago—Britta Phillips played bass in place of the originating Justin Harwood, and Penthouse was the last album for drummer Stanley Demeski, who’d go on to The Feelies; it’s been the hard-hitting Lee Wall ever since.

But Dean Wareham held court front and center as he always did, with his searching, mysterious lyrics in deadpan tones and interesting guitar figures. And still with him, trading off on some guitar interplay was Sean Eden, who has been around since their second album. It’s a formidable group, who face one another when they’re sitting out sparks of elongated anthems as if they’re a jam band on long workouts like “23 Minutes in Brussels” or “Freakin’ and Peakin,’” which speeds up, slows down and speeds up again before it ends.

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The TVD Storefront

TVD Radar: Yann Tiersen career-spanning Portrait 3-LP in stores 12/20

VIA PRESS RELEASE | Yann Tiersen has announced a new album, Portrait, a collection of 25 newly recorded tracks from throughout his career that includes three new songs, out on double CD, cassette, and digital platforms via Mute December 6. Heavyweight triple vinyl editions of the album will be released December 20. Both the clear and black vinyl editions of Portrait include an exclusive 7-inch with brand new alternative harpsichord versions of “Comptine d’Un Autre Été (L’Après-Midi)” and “The Waltz of the Monsters,” unavailable elsewhere.

Recorded with musicians together live in The Eskal studio to 24-track 2-inch tape, mixed to stereo ¼ inch tape then mastered from tape to vinyl, the album is a fully analog approach for Tiersen. “Limiting our ability to digitally manipulate, overdub or make changes after deciding a creative path gave an energy and beautiful tension to the recording process which I’d found was being lost with the limitless possibilities of digital recording. Not translating sounds into 1 and 0 keeps music in the real world.” The result is a vital album that fizzes with the excitement and energy found at a live concert, but packed into a studio album.

Featuring collaborations with John Grant, Gruff Rhys from Super Furry Animals, Stephen O’Malley from Sunn O))), and Blonde Redhead, the album was recorded with touring collaborators Emilie Tiersen, Ólavur Jákupsson, and Jens L Thomsen at The Eskal, the new analog studio complex Tiersen recently built on his home island of Ushant in Brittany.

All pre-orders from Yann Tiersen’s store and Mute Bank will be packaged with an exclusive set of analog printed photographs taken during the recording session at The Eskal. Pre-order the album here.

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The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve: Smashing Pumpkins,
Gish

In his 1823 essay On the Pleasure of Hating, British author and philosopher William Hazlitt wrote, “Love turns, with little indulgence, to indifference or disgust: hatred alone is immortal.” He also wrote, “We grow tired of everything but turning others into ridicule, and congratulating ourselves on their defects.” With those words he summed up my whole character. Hating’s what I do best.

Hell, I even hate things I know next to nothing about. Take the Smashing Pumpkins. I’ve despised them since the first time I heard “Bullet with Butterfly Wings,” and when people ask why I tell them, “I dunno. They just smell wrong”

But here’s another quote, this one by the 19th Century British philosopher Herbert Spencer: “There is a principle which is a bar against all information, which is proof against all arguments, and which cannot fail to keep a man in everlasting ignorance—that principle is contempt prior to investigation.” I don’t mind being called a hater. But an ignorant hater? Nobody wants to wear that hat.

So I tied myself to a chair and listened to the Smashing Pumpkins’ 1991 debut, Gish. And you know what? My ignorant hating ass was right. The Smashing Pumpkins suck. Wait, let me amend that. Billy Corgan’s voice sucks. He’s a whiner. He whines the way I used to whine when my parents would drag me through the gift shop at Fantasyland without buying me anything.

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The TVD Storefront

Needle Drop: Ferris Pier, “Lift Me Up”

LA-based Ferris Pier creates incandescent pop anthems for the dreamer in us all.

The producer’s latest composition features The Voice standout Abby Cates who lends a soothing and soulful color to his bubbly production. The video for the single spins a vivid narrative of a girl who daydreams of dancing under LA’s bright night lights, and leaves her small town life behind to do so. It’s a lively tribute to that pivotal moment when you finally decide to answer the long-suppressed urge for a change.

It’s an apropos theme, as the man behind Ferris Pier, Jonathan Pasma, cut back his hours as a professional sports physician to pursue his music. It wasn’t an easy decision to make, but Pasma knows that he couldn’t listen to the peanut gallery when he felt it was time to segue into a music career. “Lift Me Up’ is about being creatively constrained by people who are afraid of change. People who are afraid to explore and be brave,” he reflects. “I want the song to inspire people to follow their passion despite the obstacles.”

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The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve:
Bill Orcutt,
Odds Against Tomorrow

With his latest, guitarist Bill Orcutt plugs in and delivers a concise set brimming with passages of substantial beauty. While his prior acoustic explorations were noted for their heightened, often thorny abstraction, with Odds Against Tomorrow the man makes tangible strides into accessibility without sacrificing the distinctiveness, indeed the otherness, of his work. As Orcutt’s friend and Charalambides guitarist Tom Carter offers in his promo essay, the LP’s ten tracks are almost a rock record, an idea we’ll expand upon below. The album is out October 11 through the guitarist’s own Palilalia label.

Bill Orcutt’s Odds Against Tomorrow takes its name from a 1959 film noir directed by Robert Wise with a screenplay by Abraham Polonsky (under a pseudonym, as he was then blacklisted by the House Unamerican Activities Committee) and starring Harry Belafonte, Robert Ryan, Shelley Winters, Ed Begley, and Gloria Grahame. Pianist John Lewis of the Modern Jazz Quartet, assembling an orchestra peppered with jazz heavyweights (including the great guitarist Jim Hall), composed, arranged and conducted the soundtrack.

That Orcutt borrowed the title from Wise’s film is a major point of emphasis in the PR for this record, though the endeavor isn’t an homage, or at least it’s never described as such, and in fact it’s never explicitly stated if the music (or just the opening title track) is inspired by the movie, or if Orcutt even considers himself a fan of Wise’s film.

This isn’t unusual for the guitarist, whose 2013 dive into the American Songbook A History of Every One and its eponymous 2017 electric counterpart- were talking worker’s songs, Disney tunes, Irving Berlin, Christmas songs, spirituals, blues, Ornette Coleman’s “Lonely Woman,” the national anthem of the USA and more, were presented (but not played) with a discernible detachment.

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A morning mix of news for the vinyl inclined

In rotation: 10/9/19

Record Store Day Black Friday 2019 is Friday, November 29th: Exciting New Titles Set For Release At Independent Record Stores, Nationwide. Record Store Day has taken care of your holiday shopping today with the release of the list of albums, singles, CDs, cassettes and books that you’ll be wrapping up to give and get this year, all available in limited editions only at independent record stores starting on November 29, AKA Black Friday. Since 2010, the organizers of April’s worldwide celebration of the record store, Record Store Day, have worked to shift the perception of Black Friday as a mass-produced, low-as-you-can-go event, concentrating instead on a list of special releases that highlight how great gifts from a record store can be, and celebrating the kick-off of the holiday rush at independently owned neighborhood businesses. This year’s diverse list continues that tradition and it can be found now at recordstoreday.com.

Los Angeles, CA | The Get Together Indie Label Fair Will Make Its L.A. Debut At The MOCA: On Nov. 15 and 16, the Geffen Contemporary at MOCA in Downtown Los Angeles will turn into an indie music lover’s mecca with its first edition of The Get Together: Record Label Market & Music Fair. After throwing three successful seasons of the Come Together in their home in New York City, Other Music has paired up with L.A. concert/event power team Spaceland and the MOCA to bring their indie artist vinyl/merch fair and music showcase extravaganza to Southern California. Following a kick-off party the first night, on Sat. Nov. 16, the marketplace will officially launch at 11 a.m., until 5 p.m., with a chance to shop merch and vinyl from a large selection of indie labels from around the world, including Future Classic, Fat Possum, Brainfeeder, Cosmica, Domino, Matador, Mexican Summer, Ninja Tune, Rough Trade, Stones Throw, Big Crown, Sub Pop and Young Turks. The event website reveals that more labels and programming additions will be added and also notes that “you can meet and mingle with the teams behind the records you love,” which is pretty awesome.

Seattle, WA | ‘Our window to the world’: Love of music, art inspires window-dresser at Seattle’s Easy Street Records: Every day, some 20,000 pairs of eyes pass the Easy Street Records store at California Avenue and Southwest Alaska Street in West Seattle. They look over while they’re waiting for the light to change, glance over as they walk past or stop cold in front of the store to take in the work of longtime visual artist Kevin Larson. On and off for 25 years, Larson has been dressing the store’s two front windows in a style that reflects not only the tastes of the people who work there, but the store’s customers as well, while celebrating new and established artists in a way that few stores do anymore. “The window is Easy Street putting forward our stamp of approval, our recommendation of a particular album,” Larson said. “It’s a challenge to catch the essence of a record. “Sometimes it helps to listen, sometimes it doesn’t help at all. I used to install after the store closed and play the record on repeat.” Larson does it on a small budget, but with big ideas and boundless creativity, fueled by a life spent in the record business. In the process, he has made Easy Street’s windows — and the store itself — one of the city’s musical taste makers.

Requiem for a Record Store: All Things Must Pass, a documentary about the rise and fall of Tower Records, is worth a look. It’s one of those interesting stories that are relevant to me because it’s ephemeral and generational. It’s like watching a doc about free weekly newspapers thick with ads, repertory movie theaters that showed old films, or even as recent as video rental stores; all things that were big in “our” time — baby boomer’s time — and have since faded. But whatever age you are, you may find it of interest. I’d wondered how they managed to get interviews with people like Bruce Springsteen and David Geffen until I found out the director was Tom Hanks’ son Colin. As Colin’s dad nostalgically depicted in That Thing You Do, back when I was a kid, records were sold in places like TV and radio stores, department stores, and five-and-dimes (a pretty anachronistic phrase now). A few record stores existed mostly for the classical and jazz fans (I can’t really call them “crowds”) and were smallish hobby and collector stores. We boomers have lived through the whole era of the giant record superstore, rock-driven places like Sam Goody in New York and Tower Records, which started in 1960 in Sacramento and made its first giant leap to San Francisco in 1967. Its early claim to fame was completeness; every record, every genre.

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TVD San Francisco

TVD Live Shots: Obituary, Abbath, Midnight, and Devil Master at the UC Theatre, 10/5

A stroll down University Avenue in Berkeley this past Saturday night may have left many confused. Four weeks ahead of Halloween, corpse paint was on full display in anticipation of what was about to transpire within the walls of the UC Theatre where Obituary was preparing to unleash the metal in celebration of the 30th anniversary of Slowly We Rot.

By the time Devil Master kicked things off with their opening set, the room was already filling up and the crowd was clearly ready to rumble in spite of the lack of familiar tunes. But things truly kicked into gear with local favorites Midnight, a Bay Area favorite who clearly appeal to those thrash metal roots.

Midnight were a tough act to follow but Abbath showed that they were worthy of the challenge, blasting through an hour long set that included a few Immortal songs which got the floor spinning out of control. With Obituary, however, the UC went full-on sideways with a steady stream of crowd surfers keeping security busy as they poured over the barricade. The particularly brutal set kicked off with instrumental “Redneck Stomp” and paid special attention to Slowly We Rot.

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The TVD Storefront

TVD Radar: Sparks, Past Tense: The Best of Sparks 3-LP in stores 11/8

VIA PRESS RELEASE | “In any sane universe, academic studies would be devoted to Ron and Russell Mael, as they are to Dylan, Bowie or The Beatles. Municipal buildings and parks would be named after them. Statues would be erected in their honor. In the mind of the convert, Sparks are that significant.” Simon Price

BMG announces the release of a career-spanning collection by the provocateurs of pop—Sparks. Masters of reinvention, with an unappeasable ambition and a ravenous hunger for the now, Sparks—brothers Ron and Russell Mael—have been creating eye-poppingly brilliant pop music for more than 50 years. From 1967’s “Computer Girl” (recorded under the name Urban Renewal Project) to 2017’s “Check Out Time 11AM” (from the Hippopotamus sessions) Past Tense: The Best Of Sparks is an immaculate lesson in how to stay consistently interesting for fifty years.

With sleeve-notes by Simon Price, each track is hand-picked by Ron and Russell to best epitomise the era of Sparks from which they are drawn—forerunners of art rock, inventors of the synth duo, masters of new wave pop, Europop experimentalists and self-revisionists, in the 21st century they pioneered the electronic opera before delivering 2017’s pop masterpiece Hippopotamus.

Ron and Russell are currently putting the finishing touches to their new studio album, due for release in 2020. The ineluctable allure of Sparks will also be presented to the world in the as-yet-untitled documentary by the British film director Edgar Wright; meanwhile filming commences this month on Annette—the movie musical written by Sparks, directed by Leos Carax, and starring Adam Driver and Marion Cotillard.

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The TVD Storefront

TVD Radar: Rip It Up: The Specialty Records Story from Billy Vera in stores 11/5

VIA PRESS RELEASE | On November 5, 2019, BMG Books will publish Rip It Up: The Specialty Records Story by Billy Vera, with a foreword by 102-year-old label founder Art Rupe. The book is the fourth installment of BMG’s RPM Series, which focuses on pioneering record labels.

Launched in the mid-1940s, the Los Angeles-based Specialty Records emerged as one of the most important independent labels for African-American music in the 20th century. Recognizing that competing with major record companies was a losing battle, founder Art Rupe headed to Central Avenue, cultural center of L.A.’s black community, where he spent $200 on what were then known as “race records.” He carefully analyzed each, developing his own formula for a successful venture.

Soon, Specialty was scoring R&B hits with artists such as Roy Milton, Camille Howard, Jimmy and Joe Liggins, and Percy Mayfield. Drawn to the music of New Orleans, Rupe went on to sign Lloyd Price, who topped the charts with “Lawdy Miss Clawdy.” It was through Price that Specialty acquired its best-known artist, Little Richard. After “Tutti Frutti” exploded in 1955, Richard and the label scored a string of successes: “Long Tall Sally,” “Lucille,” “Keep A Knockin’,” “Good Golly Miss Molly,” and more.

In addition to R&B and the emerging sounds of rock ’n’ roll, Rupe was particularly drawn to the sounds of the church. Black gospel music was an essential element of his company, with a roster that included stars of the genre such as Sam Cooke’s Soul Stirrers, Sister Wynona Carr, Brother Joe May, and Alex Bradford and the Bradford Specials, among others.

From behind-the-scenes producers Robert “Bumps” Blackwell, J.W. Alexander, Harold Battiste, and Sonny Bono, to R&B recording stars Floyd Dixon, Guitar Slim, Jesse Belvin, Larry Williams, and Don and Dewey, Rip It Up: The Specialty Records Story offers a definitive history of the legendary label.

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TVD UK

UK Artist of the Week: Dani Sylvia

We’re all guilty of self-sabotage sometimes, whether we want to admit it or not. Dani Sylvia gets it and her ethereal new single “Lithium” hits the nail on the head.

The young singer-songwriter has already gained quite the Spotify following and she’s sure to gain more if her latest cut is anything to go by. “Lithium” is a gorgeously celestial slice of electro-pop that soothes the soul. Dani’s soft, smooth vocals soar effortlessly over the ambient musicality, creating a sound akin to the likes of BANKS, or VÉRITÉ’s brooding melodies and atmospheric soundscapes.

As mentioned above “Lithium” goes deeper that a stunning shimmering melody, it also battles emotions we’ve all dealt with one way or another in the past and accepting the negative aspects of ourselves. “Lithium” reminds us we’re not alone, and above all, we’ll be fine.

“Lithium” is in stores now.

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The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve:
Konk,
The Magic Force of
Konk 1981-1988

When it comes to blending post-punk edge with the rhythmic fire of funk, hip-hop and disco, hardly anybody did it better than New York City trailblazers Konk. Ditching an insular path for the wide open highway of hybridization, their horn-drenched sound is thoroughly documented on The Magic Force of Konk 1981-1988, a 3LP that corrals studio output, a side of live material and a whole platter of party-flowing DJ mixers on colored wax (each LP a different shade) with a 12-page booklet, notes by Ezra Gale, a reproduction of a Konk/ Pigbag gig poster, and an accompanying download. For fans of the ’80s musical subculture of NYC, it’s a fabulous one-stop-shop, out now through the Futurismo label.

This isn’t the first time Konk’s music has been given the retrospective treatment, as Soul Jazz issued The Sound of Konk (Tales of the New York Underground 1981-88) on 2LP and CD back in 2004. It was one installment in that label’s series of anthologies into subterranean NYC, and while a satisfying survey, it’s effectively expanded and improved upon by The Magic Force of Konk.

Like its predecessor, Futurismo’s collection avoids simply regurgitating the track-list of Yo!, Konk’s 1983 long-playing debut (notably, on the Belgian Les Disques Du Crépuscule label, the home of A Certain Ratio’s “Shack Up” 45). Rather, side A opens with “Konk Party” from their ’82 7-inch and side B “Your Life” from their ’84 short-player, with each side filled out with prime cuts from the first LP.

Non-chronological but also not random, with the tracks included from their ’88 set Jams sequenced on side C, the better to absorb the group’s progression toward something nearer to club music (but without ever really sacrificing the warmth of live instrumentation that gave the early stuff such a nice punch). Finishing out the side is a dip back to Konk’s debut 45, the “Soka-Loka-Moki” two-parter from 1981.

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A morning mix of news for the vinyl inclined

In rotation: 10/8/19

Ontario, CA | Owners of SRCVinyl, Prominent Independent Vinyl Record Retailer, to Open World’s First “Craft Distillery Record Shop.” SRCVinyl founders Jenna Miles and Danny Keyes have launched a small batch distillery – Limited Distilling, which will share its tasting room with SRCVinyl creating a unique indie record shop and craft spirits experience in the heart of Niagara, Canada’s wine region. Grand opening celebrations will commence October 18th – 20th with free tours & tastings, meet and greet with the distillery owners, a limited whisky release and a complimentary grand opening gift. Free tours can be booked HERE: http://www.distillery.ltd. …Located at 14 Henegan Road, Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario, Limited Distillery is centrally located within Niagara’s famous brewery, winery and distillery trail. The 9,000 square foot industrial space will provide spirit and vinyl record enthusiasts the ability to tour and experience a true craft distillery, sample and purchase seasonal, small-batch spirits while shopping for vinyl records.

Winnipeg, CA | Get the record straight: Vinyl lovers have new Osborne location to search through bins for long-lost favourites. On Sunday, Brent Jackson, the 39-year-old owner of Old Gold Vintage Vinyl, an eclectic, pop-up record shop that recently landed a permanent address in Osborne Village, will be one of 90 vendors taking part in Rockin’ Richard’s Record and CD Sale. This will be Jackson’s 20th appearance at the twice-a-year sale in Winnipeg, the second largest of its kind in the country. And while the hip-hop, funk and soul DJ again devoted a chunk of time in the days leading up to the event debating which albums to bring along and which to leave behind, he admits he could have simplified things somewhat, by heading there with boxes and boxes filled with the exact same album. “Seriously, if I went there with nothing but Fleetwood Mac’s Rumours, I’d probably be just as far ahead at the end of the day,” he says with a chuckle…

Taipei, TW | Man gifts 10,000 albums to Tainan music library: Yeh Sze-ya (葉思雅), an academic in obstetrics and gynecology living in Arcadia, California, has donated his collection of more than 10,000 classical music records and CDs to the Hsu-shih Music Library in Tainan. Yeh and his wife, Grace Chang (張信惠), resolved to give away 4,350 vinyl records and 6,350 CDs, which became a huge three-month project, as they had to spend eight hours each day organizing and packing the items into more than 100 boxes so that the shipments would comply with customs regulations and international copyright rules. “I knew it was a huge job, but doable,” the 82-year-old retired doctor said. “If we can help younger people, then it is like extending our lives. The Western Paradise in Buddhism or Heaven in Christianity do not necessarily have to exist, as long as these experiences that once touched us can be passed down to the next generation,” he said.

Boston, MA | Streamed music and digital images have driven the comeback of vinyl and printed photos: The resurgence of vinyl records in a time of digital music and streaming is a story of how innovation can make technological comebacks possible. In the summer of 2019, the sales of vinyl albums are on the verge of becoming the largest source of revenue from physical sales in the music industry. This follows 15 years of upward trend – today, while remaining a niche product, the vinyl record may well eventually survive to be the only analogue medium for music, as the sales of CD continue their downward spiral. Researchers in sociology and consumer culture have shown how this trend goes well beyond nostalgia – buyers of vinyl are attracted by its status as an object, its physical presence. This attraction matters even more today, as most of the time listening to a song does not involve buying a physical support anymore.

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TVD UK

TVD Live Shots: Keane and Marie White at Royal Albert Hall, 9/28

Keane made a triumphant return to London’s famed Royal Albert Hall for a two-night stint which sold out almost instantly—one week after the release of their new record Cause and Effect and six years since their last studio record. Strangeland came out to mixed reviews back in 2012, but I would argue it’s the crown jewel of the band’s catalogue, a clear indicator that the band was at its creative peak both musically and visually. I saw them twice in the States on that tour, and both shows were above and beyond anything I had seen that year.

A few years into Keane’s hiatus, Tom Chaplin answered the question on everyone’s mind—can he write the songs and go solo? The Wave was a swift and masterful response and a resounding yes; this guy can pretty much do it all, even when sober, when many musicians often lose their creative edge and fail. Throw in a Christmas album and a tour of the UK where Chaplin brilliantly performed the songs of Queen, and one would think that this would be a set up for Strangeland part two: bigger, bolder, braver. But was that even necessary?

Fast forward to just a few weeks ago, Keane returned after seven years with the much-anticipated Cause and Effect. In true Keane fashion, it’s another curveball of a record for the hardcore fans. All the elements that make this band so great are here but they’re stripped down a bit—the experimentation and theatrics that made Strangeland so daring and perfect are missing. And that’s OK because the songs, the stories, and most importantly the voice are all there. It’s as if the band wanted to go back to basics. Make no mistake, this is a pop record, but with a level of substance that’s missing from the overproduced garbage dominating the radio today.

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