TVD Los Angeles

TVD Live Shots:
Young the Giant and
Fitz and the Tantrums
at the Forum, 8/10

PHOTOS: JULIA LOFSTRAND | Feel good pop music continues to appeal to the masses. The Forum, an imposing piece of architecture in the heart of Inglewood, is a legendary Los Angeles venue built in 1967 to resemble a Roman Coliseum by the same firm that built Madison Square Garden. The Forum is a prestigious venue to play. But last Saturday, at a venue that has seen everyone from The Eagles to Diana Ross, modern indie pop music prevailed.

Not entirely sold out but close to capacity, the crowd was a mixture of families, fashionistas, and low-key people sporting Vans and Hawaiian shirts; hints to a more laid back Southern California lifestyle. The young children in attendance signaled a night of youthful and joyous, spirited music that only concerned parents would permit their children listen to. I was singing “Shout at the Devil” by Mӧtley Crüe at 6-years-old but hey…we all have different experiences and tastes in life, and that’s just what this show represented.

The night seemed a little motley too. The Nashville trio COIN, who define their music as pop songs with rock instrumentation in an interview with Billboard magazine opened the show and played their most popular hit to date “Talk Too Much.”

Fitz and the Tantrums took the stage bringing the kids to their feet as they danced to the band they no doubt came to see. But it wasn’t just the children who loved this 18-song set, the entirety of the arena sang along as Michael Fitzpatrick and Noelle Scaggs, the vocal duo of the group, powered through the high-energy Motownesque dance songs they are known for.

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The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve:
Paul Kantner,
Planet Earth Rock and Roll Orchestra

On which Paul Kantner takes off for outer space in a bong-shaped spaceship, only to crash back to earth because the sheer number of Jefferson Starship hangers-on he’s packed on board exceed the vessel’s weight capacity. This 1983 concept album–the sequel to his 1970 (Hugo Award-nominated!) LP Blows Against the Empire–is subtitled The Empire Blows Back. At least he got the blows part right.

The album–the purported soundtrack to a novel by Kantner that actually saw the light of day in 1991–tells the completely plausible story of a S.F. band that develops telepathic amplification technology, falls afoul of the U.S. government, seeks sanctuary in the Australian outback, and finally whisks off to the safety of outer space. For those of us who flee to higher ground whenever the mummified survivors of the Jefferson Airplane congregate in a recording studio, their permanent departure is what you might call a dream scenario.

But such is not the case with everyone. You probably don’t know about it because the U.S. government is afraid to start a panic, but almost 20 years ago NASA received a mysterious transmission from Voivod 4, the planet on which the Planet Earth Rock and Roll Orchestra finally touched down.

The transmission was in the form of complaint, and specifically blamed our planet for “recklessly hurling its refuse into space, the way a fat guy might toss a half-full Slurpee cup from the driver’s side window of a rusting 1974 Ford Pinto.” It closed by threatening the human race with extinction, via a weapon it described as “a really, really big bug zapper you don’t want to stand in front of.” Needless to say this interplanetary communique caused consternation amongst the leaders of the world, all of whom agreed to blame Moldova.

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The TVD Storefront

Needle Drop: FerrariLover,
“Endless Seconds”

San Diego-based, LGB ambient guitarist FerrariLover creates diaphanous and compelling overtures, rife with exquisite sonic designs.

Her otherworldly compositions sit somewhere between the scores of 1950s film noir and the brainy mise-en-scène of Phillip Glass. These are not obvious or easily digestible songs, more like breadcrumbs that lead us along a hidden path into FerrariLover’s inner world.

“Endless Seconds” was shot out in the Las Vegas desert, which is a perfect backdrop for the song’s expansive pallet of shadowy twang. The spacious landscape reflects the dynamic nature of the song—you can choose to wade in the eerie, open-ended atmospherics of it all, or pick out a specific cloud cluster to focus on. But like the time-lapse footage, the object of your attention will quickly morph into something completely new as dissonant chords settle and find harmony within the malleable aural pallet.

FerrariLover’s forthcoming LP, Exotic Legend, arrives in stores August 23rd.

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The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve: Cadillac Baby’s Bea & Baby Records: The Definitive Collection

As evidenced by the threads he’s sporting in the cover photo above, Narvel Eatmon, better known as Cadillac Baby, was a colorful character. Having made the trip from Mississippi to Chicago, by the 1950s he was a smooth operator who ran his own club; by decade’s end he was trying his hand at releasing records. Commercially, the results were modestly successful at best, but the contents of the 4CD + 128pg hardback book Cadillac Baby’s Bea & Baby Records: The Definitive Collection documents a layer of the Windy City’s blues experience that ran alongside the dominant sound of Chess and fortifies the years between Cobra Records and the Delmark label. It’s out August 16 through Earwig Music Company.

Some of the names included in this set are obscure, but there is a high number of contributors who will be immediately familiar to blues fans; right off the bat, or more accurately immediately after the opening track “Welcome to Cadillac Baby’s Show Lounge,” which comes from Bea & Baby’s sole LP, 1971’s Colossal Blues (marketed as a live recording but obviously concocted from studio-originated songs and “club atmosphere”), there’s Eddie Boyd, he of 1951 R&B chart #1 “Five Long Years.”

Across the four discs, he’s followed by such notables as Earl Hooker, Hound Dog Taylor (making his recording debut), James Cotton, Sunnyland Slim, Homesick James, and in contrast to the prevailing currents of electricity, the acoustic folk-blues styling of Sleepy John Estes and Hammie Nixon, the duo offered up via four cuts, all previously unreleased.

And to clarify, Bea & Baby wasn’t strictly about the blues. There are dips into R&B, courtesy of the sprightly pop-tinged gal group action of The Chances, deep smooth crooner Phil Sampson, and the late Andre Williams even making an appearance, though the doo-wop-tinged work of the Daylighters is a bit more prevalent through their own stuff and overdubbed onto a revamped Eddie Boyd single in hopes of increased market appeal. But 11 Year Old Faith Evans & the Sweet Teens, with their symphonic heart tug A-side backed with up-tempo doo-wop nugget nearly steal the non-blues show.

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A morning mix of news for the vinyl inclined

In rotation: 8/14/19

Tyler, TX | National Vinyl Record Day: August 12th is National Vinyl Record day, and while many people have moved on to streaming music, Curious Collections in Bryan is hoping change some hearts. August 12th is National Vinyl Record day, and while many people have moved on to streaming music, Curious Collections in Bryan is hoping change some hearts. Vinyl records made their debut in the early 30’s and fell out of use in the early 90’s, but now, shop owner, Mary House says, “vinyl is back.” House opened Curious Collections in 2016 with her dad’s old record collection. “He had a climate controlled collection full of vinyl, and he passed away a couple of years ago, and my brother and I cleaned out all the storage unit and decided that I was gonna bring a 26 foot moving truck full of stuff and open up a record store,” she said. And three years later, the shop is still going strong for a bit more than just general nostalgia’s sake.

Peoria, IL | For some music lovers, every day is National Vinyl Record Day: Monday morning, like every morning, Craig Moore had his turntable spinning. At his Younger than Yesterday record shop, he was grooving to “Arap Saci,” by Erkin Koray, who in the ’60s pioneered Turkish rock. “He is known around the world as the Turkish Jimi Hendrix,” Moore said. “Some of his stuff is worth a fortune, if you can find in it in mint condition.” I knew none of that before Monday, which is part of the wonder of chatting with Moore. He and his shop, at 2615 N. University St., overflow with nuggets of nostalgia and knowledge. But he was unaware of the reason for my intrusion: what, I asked, would he be doing to mark National Vinyl Record Day? “I didn’t know there was such a thing,” he said. Neither had I, until I saw a blurb on a news feed. In 2002 in California, San Luis Obispo County proclaimed Aug. 12 — the date Thomas Edison invented the photograph, in 1877 — as Vinyl Record Day. A not-for-profit organization has since been pushing to get people to recognize the date as National Vinyl Record Day.

Palm Beach, FL | National Vinyl Record Day: Why are there so many record stores in Palm Beach County? Analogopolis Records, Films, Games & Things is a mouthful of a title for a record store. Let owner Tom Procyk explain. “There are all these record stores with crazy names,” he said. “I was looking for something hard to say and hard to pronounce, but once you hear it you won’t forget it.” The 36-year-old music enthusiast opened Analogopolis (rough translation: city of sound) in a Juno Beach shopping plaza last November. His red-walled store is tastefully curated, with over 1,000 vinyl platters presented alongside everything from throwback laser discs to vintage Florida post cards. Of course, Procyk is ready for The Question. Yes, vinyl is hip. Yes, vinyl is making its zillionth comeback. But is it possible for a physical record store to survive and even thrive in an age of online streaming? “Everybody asks that, a couple times a day,” said Procyk, a former film projectionist. “I figured the time was right. I’ve got a strong customer base that comes every week to buy albums. “I’m not going to be rich, but it’s better than punching a clock.”

Hudson Valley, NY | Where to buy vinyl in the Hudson Valley: It was a sad day when I realized that I should have saved my vinyl record collection. Yes, I was one of those who got tired of packing up my record collection every time I moved in the 80’s and 90’s. CD’s seemed to be so much more portable, NOT! Anyway back in 1990 something I sold all my vinyl records at a yard sale. Some nice gentleman with what seemed like a lot of cash at the time loaded up my entire collection in to his trunk and drove off. I was so thrilled until about 5 years ago. Five years ago I realized that I not only missed my records, I missed my record player. My 80’s stereo sold at the same sale as the records. Since then I have gotten a new record player and have started collecting records again. Today, August 12th is National Vinyl Record Day so I am thinking that if you are like me it would be a good day to start building back your collection.

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TVD Chicago

TVD Live Shots:
Kacey Musgraves
at the Metro, 8/3

WORDS AND IMAGES: JEREMY LAWSON | Kacey Musgraves is in the middle of an insanely successful and busy year, having been on the road with her “Oh What a World” tour practically non-stop since January 9th (and picking up an impressive pile of Grammys along the way).

Chicago has been especially good to her: Kacey performed for a sold out crowd at the Chicago Theater last March and was back in town on August 3rd, this time playing to a packed house at the Metro on the eve of her Lollapalooza set.

The show opened just as her album Golden Hour does, with the lovely, mellow and so, so singable “Slow Burn,” inviting her fans to warm up their vocal chords and perform along with her. The crowd did not disappoint on that front, as they matched Kacey word-for-word on every song throughout the set; a testament to how Kacey’s music has resonated with today’s listeners and a harbinger of amazing performances yet to come.

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The TVD Storefront

TVD Radar: Lakeshore Records’ Les Misérables original series score on vinyl, in stores 9/6

VIA PRESS RELEASE | Lakeshore Records is set to release the original score on vinyl to the critically-acclaimed BBC/PBS Masterpiece limited series Les Misérables, written by composer John Murphy (28 Days Later, Sunshine, Kick-Ass). The vinyl record will be released on September 6th. Pre-order the vinyl release here.

Series director Tom Shankland wanted John to tell a fresh musical story and to ultimately create a raw and uncompromising score to reflect the trials and misery of “Les Misérables.” John described the scoring process as an experimental journey: “My original idea for the score to Les Mis was ‘1816 Velvet Underground meets ’60s French film music.’ Tom [Shankland] was thinking ‘gnarly, down in the dirt, French folk music.’ Producer Chris Carey suggested, ‘let’s try both, but throw in some vintage analog synths.’ I then gleefully tried all of these elements, often at the same time. And we discovered that you can actually mix a hurdy gurdy with a Moog Sub Phatty, and we loved it. And what started out as a musical standoff, became our score for Les Misérables.

About Les Misérables | The six-part drama adaptation stars Dominic West (The Affair, The Hour) as Jean Valjean, and David Oyelowo (Selma) as Javert in this landmark drama adaptation. They are joined in this epic event drama by Lily Collins (Rules Don’t Apply, Love, Rosie), in the role of Fantine.

With a striking intensity and relevance to us today, Victor Hugo’s novel is testimony to the struggles of France’s underclass and how far they must go to survive. The six-part television adaptation of the renowned book will vividly and faithfully bring to life the vibrant and engaging characters, the spectacular and authentic imagery and, above all, the incredible yet accessible story that was Hugo’s lifework.

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The TVD Storefront

Ryan Romana of Press Junkie PR, The TVD First Date & Vinyl Giveaway

“I first experienced my passion for vinyl when I went through my dad’s record collection of pop songs in the ’80s in our basement turned disco, where my parents would entertain.”

“I remember flipping through 45s of Madonna, Michael Jackson, Prince, Cyndi Lauper, and The Police. I loved how each record had its own identity and that the records had these tactile grooves which you could run your fingers on. Once the needle touched the record, I remember thinking it was magic, how the sound jumped out from the records through the speakers.

Growing up, my parents would entertain co-workers and friends in our disco basement filled with strobe lights, linoleum flooring, and a disco ball. Part of my job would be to keep the music going by changing the records. Once, I discovered the world of DJing and hip hop, I thought it would be cool to try to scratch a record like I saw on MTV. To my surprise, my dad’s belt driven turntables and needle were not ready for the abuse and I broke one of his record players. He was livid, and rightfully so. So, I researched and found out that I would need Technics to practice scratching.

When I got to college at CU Boulder, I hopped on KVCU as a radio DJ and the station also had a huge vinyl library, way bigger than my dad’s collection. From being on air, I knew that I wanted to buy Technics and pursue DJing. The next summer, I saved up to buy one Technics turntable and a Gemini mixer.

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TVD UK

UK Artist of the Week: Canary Gold

Glasgow’s been on a pretty decent roll recently when it comes to producing great new music, and today is no exception. Canary Gold are the latest pair of Scots to impress us with their undeniably spellbinding blend of indie-electronica.

Canary Gold are brothers Spencer and JP O’Grady and they are indeed worth your attention, so listen up. Their latest single “Hummingbird” is a celestial slice of indie rock that combines twinkling piano notes with a driving, tribal-like beat to create a sound that is truly unique. Fans of the likes of Alt J and Local Natives will feel at home here.

Talking about the single, the duo explain, “in our heads Hummingbird is about a made-up apocalypse but it’s quite open to interpretation. We thought innocent image of a hummingbird against the back drop of some of those dark lyrics brings out a really interesting contrast.”

“Hummingbird” is in stores now via Master Closet Records.

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The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve:
The Frogs,
It’s Only Right and Natural

Simply put, The Frogs’ It’s Only Right and Natural is one of the most deliriously bent records to have emerged from the 1980s underground scene. The handiwork of brothers Jimmy and (the late) Dennis Flemion and originally issued on the Homestead label, the album’s 14 songs wedded over-the-top homoerotic subject matter to a twisted, druggy folk-rock approach, and like the best of satire could inspire miscomprehension and even downright hostility. But the true root of the LP, which is being reissued for the first time in stereo August 16 by The End of All Music, is a stealthily sturdy batch of tunes. Not everyone’s gonna like it, but that’s exactly how it is with many great, singular things.

There are parts of It’s Only Right and Natural, (okay, most if it), that in 2019, can be accessed as “problematic.” The record, which plunges deep into gay stereotypes in a way that has always connected to me (and many others) as lampooning the fevered imaginations of the sexually intolerant, lacks the “here’s a lesson” didacticism of so much lesser satire and instead embraces the juvenile, which is why it’s sometimes assessed as a mere joke.

Obviously, it’s that decided lack of maturity (i.e. tastelessness) that will make this alb a take it or leave it proposition. But really, it’s always been that way with The Frogs, an act who not only persevered but became a subject of Alt-rock celebrity championing in the ’90s: they were on Cobain’s top 50 albums list, they were loved by Billy Corgan, “I Don’t Care If U Disrespect Me (Just So You Love Me)” was sampled by Beck, and they secured fans in Pearl Jam, Skid Row’s Sebastian Bach, filmmaker Harmony Korine, and the Blake Babies, who named their “Rosy Jack World” EP after a song from this LP.

I bought my CD copy before all this, based on a terse description that was making the rounds that The Frogs were a “gay supremacist duo.” Coupled with the disc’s cover, a certain will to provoke became apparent. I had to hear it. Back then, I was surely hit by that juvenile aspect, but along the way, The Frogs tangled with those stereotypes in a manner that was so ridiculous, perhaps attaining an apex (or nadir) with “Baby Greaser George,” that it became impossible to take the sentiments seriously (the music is no joke, though).

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A morning mix of news for the vinyl inclined

In rotation: 8/13/19

Traverse City, MI | MTM On The Road: National Vinyl Record Day at RPM Records in Traverse City: Spin the turn tables today and play your favorite vinyl record. It’s National Vinyl Record Day! And a must-stop shop in Traverse City is ready to help you add to or start your own collection. RPM Records has more than 70,000 vinyl records with all of the classics and modern hits. The store will also repair your equipment or help you find what you’re looking for if you want to buy a new turn table. Join Regan Blissett and Stephanie Adkins as they take a look at how to start your own collection, take care of your records, and more.

Burlington, NC | Alamance has plenty of vinyl lovers: Vinyl Record Day marks a growing trend. Vinyl records have been declared dead many times, but keep rallying, and now there are two local businesses living on vinyl records and a couple of others at least making some money on them. “I’ve had 17-year-old girls ask for Frank Sinatra records and a 9-year-old kid say ‘look dad — Dean Martin,’ ” said Jon Guza, owner of HiFi Records in downtown Graham, which sells new and used records and draft beer. Vinyl sales increased 15 percent in 2018 with record-breaking Record Store Day sales in April, according to Nielsen, amid rapid growth of total music sales, especially streaming, which increased 49 percent. August 12 is Vinyl Record Day, which marks the day Thomas Edison invented the phonograph in 1877. Vinyl enthusiast — if that’s a strong enough word — Gary Freiberg had it designated in 2002 in San Obispo County, Calif., and dedicated a non-profit organization to preserving and appreciating records and having vinyl record parties on the Saturday after Aug. 12.

UK | Premier League referee Jon Moss Q&A: Music and football: The Premier League is back! But spare a thought for the top flight referees, who will be under more scrutiny than ever before. We already know how Mike Dean escapes the pressure of officiating at the highest level – by giving it loads in the away end at his beloved Tranmere Rovers. Now his colleague Jon Moss has opened a record shop in Leeds – wonderfully called The Vinyl Whistle – so BBC Sport went to meet Moss to talk music and football… Guilty pleasure? Take That. We went to see them a couple of years back. Someone gave me some tickets – we didn’t pay for them – what a show it was. Greatest Day. I’m not into that kind of music, but I love that song. And Miley Cyrus, The Climb. What a tune that is! My daughter likes to sing it to me occasionally just to really annoy me. But what a tune… Which grounds have the best music? When we do our pre-match routine we go out for a warm-up about 2.30pm. The best ever soundtrack warming up was at Rochdale. It was all the Indie Classics. You’re trying to do your warm-up and they had Stone Roses, Oasis, into a bit of Joy Division, back to New Order. It was just the perfect soundtrack to warm up to.

Chicago, IL | Oak Park artist chosen to paint Val mural: Mini-mural project to commemorate late local entrepreneur, celebrity. The Oak Park Area Arts Council has announced its second round of winners for its 2019 mini-mural project, and Oak Parker Joe Abboreno was chosen to paint the mural the group is dedicating to the late Val Camilletti. Camilletti was a beloved figure in Oak Park for decades as owner of Val’s halla Records, a music store located at 723½ South Boulevard for more than three decades before moving to 239 Harrison St. in 2006. Shortly after Camilletti’s death in 2018, Oak Park residents aimed to have an honorary street sign installed on South Boulevard for the late record purveyor, but the Oak Park Board of Trustees denied the request, instead choosing to commission a mural. The Oak Park Area Arts Council, which commissions 20 murals per year along Union Pacific Railroad retaining wall along North and South boulevards as part of its mini-mural project, specified that one of the murals would commemorate Camilletti. “She really touched a lot of lives,” Abboreno said in a telephone interview.

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TVD Los Angeles

TVD Live Shots: Backstreet Boys with Baylee Littrell at the Honda Center, 8/5

ANAHEIM, CA | I’m a rocker at heart, but I gotta say that AJ McLean, Howie Dorough, Nick Carter, Kevin Richardson, and Brian Littrell brought out my softer side on Monday night at the Honda Center. A sold-out crowd of 15,000+ joined me for a massive 33 song set that took us all on a wild ride down Backstreet and beyond. These guys haven’t lost a step since they took the world by storm in 1993 and would argue they have only gotten better with age. Backstreet’s definitely back—and in a big way!

Although I enjoyed some of the Backstreet Boys classics back in the day, they really weren’t my cup of tea. When I heard they were headlining at the Honda Center, I honestly didn’t think this band had the cachet to sell out an arena of this size. Legendary artists such as Elton John, Depeche Mode, and U2 have sold-out multiple nights at Honda, and I was skeptical at best that BSB would be able to pull that off.

As I walked up to the arena on Monday night, I was greeted by thousands upon thousands of rabid fans circling the building. Many had been there hours on end, waiting for their chance to rush the barricade and be up close and personal with their childhood heroes. The area surrounding the Honda Center was packed with fans from all walks of life including a few of bible thumpers warning BSB fans they were going to hell for attending the show. I didn’t know Backstreet sold their souls to the devil but guess anything could be possible these days. What I thought would be an average show at best was already shaping up to be something so much more.

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TVD UK

TVD Live Shots: The Descendents, CJ Ramone, and Pears at Shepherd’s Bush Empire, 8/2

Punk rock royalty came to London recently via Rebellion—the world’s largest punk rock festival—in the form of The Descendents, CJ Ramone, and Pears. Having been a longtime fan of The Descendents, this would be the first time for me seeing them live. These pop-punk pioneers are one of the most significant bands of the ’80s hardcore punk movement. The band’s brand is a staple in the punk community and lead by the instantly recognizable caricature of singer Milo Aukerman which continues to be the mascot for the band since the early 1980s.

Aukerman has been called a champion of the nerds because he would land the unlikely punk rock role of a plant molecular biologist at DuPont. Or does that make it even more punk? (Remember when Johnny Rotten did the butter commercial and claimed that was the most punk thing he could do?) Although he quit his job after being relocated to Siberia for work (you really can’t make this shit up) Aukerman decided to go at it alone. There’s a spectacular interview with him where he talks about breaking free from the corporate world (“the man”) and setting out to do his own thing. I think he quickly had the realization that he could have done this much earlier on, then again as the great James Altucher says, “it’s never too late to reinvent yourself,” and that certainly applies to punk rock.

The show was packed to the fucking gills with old and new school punks alike. Hell, there were all types of people in the crowd that night which is a common sight lately with the London punk scene. (It’s always full of surprises.) The band came out guns a-blazing, blasting through their signature pop-punk setlist—and the first three songs were over before you knew it. Thank the punk gods that security let the photogs stay in for a few more minutes.

Milo and company fully evoked the spirit and energy of punk and kept it going for 90 minutes plus. How many other bands can fit 35 songs including two encores into a standard set before curfew? Not many. Pulling heavily from 2016’s Hypercaffium Spazzinate as well as the classic albums Milo Goes to College and Everything Sucks, The Descendents were in top form and never missed a beat.

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The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve: Ramones, Ramones

It’s easy to take this the Ramones’ landmark 1976 self-titled debut too seriously. Sure, it signaled a seismic shift in rock music, exploding like an M80 in the minds of every cretinous young thing who’d had it up to here with the pompous, bloated likes of ELP, Queen, and the Eagles. And sure, this baby is often celebrated as the first real punk rock LP.

But so far as declarations of war go, Ramones is a hilarious one. On it the most famous band to ever come out of Forest Hills, Queens state their demands (they wanna be your boyfriend and they wanna sniff some glue; they don’t wanna go down to the basement and they don’t wanna walk around with you), dabble with fascism (“I’m a Nazi schatze”), and beat on the brat with a baseball bat. The Ramones weren’t the first NYC band to give voice to the inchoate yearnings of teengenerates everywhere; the Dictators got there first with 1975’s Go Girl Crazy!, and they deserve their due. 

But unlike Handsome Dick Manitoba and Company the Ramones got their yucks playing their songs at tempos that boggled the imagination; I saw the Ramones early on, without having ever heard a single note of their music, and the experience bordered on the traumatic.

The songs–which segued one into the other with nary a pause–went by at an insane, buzzsaw blur that night, obfuscating what is obvious to anyone who listens to the album now–that the Ramones mated their 160 beats per minute ferocity to an impeccable pop sense that gives many of these songs the loving feel of good bubblegum.

The Ramones won their rep by keeping their songs nasty, brutish and short. But their secret ingredient was melody; their songs are both catchy and likable, and that’s what makes Ramones sound as fresh today as it did the day it hit the streets.

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The TVD Storefront

Ashley Sofia,
The TVD First Date

“Growing up my parents had kept a very curated sense of art, music, and books in our house that I was exposed to. My mother was always playing Jim Croce or Simon and Garfunkel or James Taylor. My dad was always singing and playing his guitar, and I was raised with all these older sounds and flavors.”

“We spent a lot of weekends in antique stores looking at collectibles, and items from the past. When I was little it bored me, but over time, it became this thing I absorbed and couldn’t shake off. I was young but I was beginning to develop old tastes and sensibilities and style from a totally different time period.

I remember I started collecting vinyl before I even had a record player. I could get them for cheap growing up, 30 cents, sometimes a nickel, because everybody was getting rid of them back then. The CD was the future. I’d lay on the floor and read their liner notes and big/ giant photographs.

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