TVD Vinyl Giveaway:
Marley, Original Movie Sountrack

The Original Soundtrack for the excellent Bob Marley doc, Marley has been on my desk at TVD HQ for close to two weeks now, staring at me, in anticipation of this vinyl giveaway. But I held off on purpose so I could catch the film first, for which I was able to set aside some time away from the turntable last weekend.

And how could I not? Bob’s music has been omnipresent for what seems like eons now. But in an odd twist, Marley’s strength as a portrait of the man lies not with music, but with the life lived.

Sure, the music informs the background, but it’s the man as a human being and a natural force—some might say, mystic—which propels the doc’s narrative. Filmmaker Kevin Macdonald is far more concerned with flesh and bone, rather than rattling off LP releases or meandering through the Marley discography, year by year, event by event—and it’s refreshing to say the very least.

But however refreshing a portrait the doc paints, it’s unfathomable to separate the man from his music—so we’re going to put the gorgeous 3 LP soundtrack into the hands of one of you.

From the press folks: “As an integral companion piece to this critically acclaimed documentary, the official soundtrack from Marley will be released through Universal Music Enterprises (UMe) on April 17, 2012, as a 2-CD collection and a special 3-LP vinyl set.

Featured are classic studio recordings, a special Kindred Spirit dub mix of “Exodus” and tracks from various live performances including, for the first time on record, the 1978 One Love Peace Concert performance of “Jammin’” during which Marley joined the hands of bitter political rivals Michael Manley and Edward Seaga, a gesture which went some way towards restoring peace to a strife-torn Jamaica.”

Enter to win the 3 LP copy of Marley, the Original Movie Soundtrack, by simply telling us your favorite Bob Marley track or LP in the comments below. (And why—briefly—wouldn’t hurt.) The most insightful commenter of the lot (with a North American mailing address) will find the LP in his or her mailbox. We’ll choose our winner a week from today, 6/7!

Marley, the Original Movie Soundtrack, track listing:
Corner Stone – 2:29
Judge Not – 2:27
Simmer Down – 2:50
Small Axe – 4:02
Natty Dread – 3:36
Trenchtown Rock (Live at Roxy Theatre) – 4:45
Get Up Stand Up – 3:20
Work – 3:41
Jammin (Live at One Love Peace Concert) – 9:11
Exodus Dub (Kindred Spirit Dub Mix) – 7:46
No Woman, No Cry (Live at the Lyceum) – 7:09
Three Little Birds – 3:00
Real Situation – 3:08
Could You Be Loved – 3:58
One Love / People Get Ready – 2:52
Redemption Song – 3:48
High Tide, Low Tide – 4:09

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  • http://frednula.blogspot.com/ Frednula

    I discovered Legend in when I was in high school in Gray, Maine in the mid-1980’s.  I listened to it incessantly in an attempt to dilute the love-lorn depression that haunted me through those years.  It constantly gave me hope and made me feel good.  Oh so good.

  • italianmojo887

    Get Up Stand Up is my pick. The lyrics are so motivating and thought provoking.

  • ChrisWHill

    It’s gotta be Three Little Birds. – This song was released when I was 3. It’s one of those songs that you may not remember the first time you heard it, but you know it by heart and aren’t sure how. There aren’t many songs like that. Such a simple singable melody with lyrics full of hope and truth. The song transcends age, sex, race, beliefs, and just begs you to bob your head and sing along. Isn’t that music’s best side?

  • Brad shelton

    It’s really difficult to pick just one. High tide, low tide has to one of my favs. Good slow groove with a positive vibe and lyric. This song takes me in my mind to sand, palm trees, and warm sunshine.

  • http://www.bandsoup.com/ RM London

    In middle school, Bob Marley was an enigmatic face plastered on tie-dyed shirts of the stoners, hippies and cigarette smokers on the corner. I had no clue who it was, but I was lucky enough to have a father that would allow me to buy at least one album every other weekend to figure these types of mysteries out.
     
    The first album I bought was, of course, “Legend.” How could you not? It was the one album that conquered the small corner of the Tower Records’ reggae section; an album that always sat on a throne of “you-probably-should-own-this” displays. “Legend” was beautiful. If you can get an 8th grader to be instantly enamored with reggae when he has only been exposed to classic rock, 80’s pop (thanks, Mom!), and radio-friendly alternative rock (90s), you’ve done something very powerful, in my opinion. I loved it. Every song was catchy, pleasant, and well put together. I had no idea why he shot the sheriff and not the deputy or what a buffalo soldier was, but I wanted more.
     
    For years, I bought every Bob Marley album I saw. Some were weird, unauthorized compilations and collections of the same tracks, but I still bought them, loved them, wore them out. I became a huge fan. Even though I wasn’t a stoner, a hippy, or a cigarette smoker, I understood why they liked this guy. Despite not really paying attention to the lyrics, not knowing the power of his message, and merely enjoying it for the sound, rhythm, and arrangements– I loved Bob Marley’s music. 
     
    As I got older, the other intangibles became clearer. I learned more about him, his background, what Rastafari was, what he meant to his country, what he meant to the world. I began to understand the lyrics: the pain, the strife, the want for peace, the passion, the soul. It made the music mean even more. It made me understand the true power of music. I understood why his face was on a t-shirt.
     
    I really have to thank those stoners, hippies, and cigarette smokers. We had nothing in common, but I found about some of my favorite musicians from their shirts and sharpie scribbles on their notebooks. Without them, I probably wouldn’t have bothered with reggae or Marley, but because of them I found a new genre, a new artist, and a new voice– of another world far different from my own– that would be the soundtrack to many memories, milestones, and fleeting moments.
     
    I first listened to Bob Marley when I was 13 years old. I am 29 now and my favorite LP is “Natty Dread”– the spiritually and politically charged album with ‘Them Belly Full’, ‘No Woman, No Cry’, and ‘Lively Up Yourself’– and my favorite song is still “Sun is Shining” (the slower “Kaya” version over the “Soul Revolution” version).
     
    Thanks to the guys and girls on the corner that were always surrounded in smoke. I still spin the recommendations that you wore on your chests.

  • http://dnorsen.com Dnorsen

    Hands down the original mix of catch a fire. It’s more raw kind of primitive and just plain beautiful. It’s a big family favorite in our household.

  • http://dnorsen.com/ dnorsen

    hands down the original version of catch a fire. its raw, primitive and absolutely beautiful. its a big play here in our household with no vetos …

  • http://thevinyldistrict.com/ The Vinyl District

    A winner has been chosen – thank you!

  • SUPPORTING YOUR LOCAL INDIE SHOPS SINCE 2007


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