In rotation: 2/19/20

Lincoln City, OR | Output Music reopening in Lincoln City, owners make big plans for 2020: Output Music was a music community cornerstone for Lincoln County from 2005 to 2011. Now, 2020 will see Output reopening as Output Records. Lincoln City’s new again music store will sell vinyl records, turntables, music accessories and a curated selection of clothing, homegoods and accessories. The owners, Corrie and Taj Richardson, say they want to help the Central Oregon Coast get into vinyl records. “The music format has made a big comeback over the last 10 years; we’re selling turntables too, so if someone doesn’t have one already, we can get them set up with a turntable, speakers, and their first record for around $150 bucks,” the Richardsons said. Beyond selling records and goods, Output Records has a mission statement that focuses on building the music community on the Central Oregon Coast. “A big part of us wanting to reopen Output is to build up a music community that gets the kids involved with music,” the Richardson’s said.

Bury, UK | Vinyl frontier – Bury at forefront of record revival: …This renewed interest has also cultivated a renaissance in high street record shops, reversing years of decline and closures which saw dealers outside major cities almost go extinct. Last summer new independent record store Wax and Beans opened at The Art Picture House ­in Haymarket Street and proved in instant smash hit. Voracious appetite for vinyl has meant the outlet is already drawing up blueprints to relocate to larger premises to better meet the needs of Bury’s music lovers. Ben Soothill, Wax and Beans’ owner, said: “I think interest in vinyl has always been there, it’s just that it has not been completely accessible. “With the push we have given it on social media and the service we provide in store I think it has struck a chord with people. “They realise it’s there, and it’s a format they have loved, and it’s really taken off.

Boston, MA | Monumental Market: Jamaica Plain’s Antidote to Spotify and Starbucks: Ask anyone who’s scoured through endless rows of vinyl in subterranean vaults during the 90s and they’ll be the first to tell you that independent record stores in Boston are a pale reflection of a once robust heyday. Second Coming Records? Dead. Pipeline Records? Dead. Mojo? Long dead. Newbury Comics? Thankfully flatlining. Even the venerable Skippy White’s—whose six-decade longevity is one of the more unique phenomena to occur during the fray of the “death of independent music retailer” ballyhoo—announced its imminent departure in December. … In Your Ear, Planet and Nuggets have collectively endured close to a century’s worth of changes in both shopping habits and the music industry. The aforementioned specialty shops like Armageddon and Deep Thoughts continue to thrive specifically because of their appeal to otherwise marginal tastes. It’s not about resurgence, but an enduring need for the tactile.

Pittsburgh, PA | Us: Turntable Doctor hopes to keep vinyl spinning: Both guys liked things that go round and round. But when the two friends parted ways as business partners 47 years ago, one landed a job with the Hubble Space Telescope, which goes round and round 340 miles above Earth, while the other continued making sure that record albums continue rotating 33⅓, 45 and 78 rpm on turntables. Today we’re focused on Vince Bomba, 63, of Mt. Lebanon, who still repairs turntables at Galaxie Electronics in Squirrel Hill, a Murray Avenue business that shares a second floor with Jerry’s Records (which sells the vinyl albums that Vince’s turntables play.) Walk up those steps and — Biff! Ping! Bam! — you’re in a time warp. Nowadays most turntable repairmen are fossils. From 1990 until 2007, turntables teetered on the brink of technological extinction that claimed cassettes, manual typewriters and pay phones. But like Alec Baldwin, vinyl has a knack for resurrection.

Derbyshire, UK | Why your 80s or 90s vinyl could net you hundreds of pounds: You could be sitting on a fortune. …What this all means for you, your parents or even your grandparents is that your old records may be worth far more than you bargained for. Our music memorabilia expert Claire Howell often sees a small box of records deliver a windfall of a few hundred pounds. For example, in a recent Music Memorabilia Auction, a collection of The Rolling Stones records plus two EPs, magazines and other assorted memorabilia made £360. Typically, a batch of records collected in your teens or early 20s may contain a few discs potentially worth £30 to £60 each. Auction a handful off and you could pocket around £400. Claire, who holds regular free valuation events at Hansons Auctioneers’ Etwall HQ, will be on-hand on Wednesday, February 19. Having been an avid music memorabilia collector for more than 30 years, she knows what’s hot and what’s not. She says that records from the 1990s are often more valuable today than, say, LPs from The Beatles or The Rolling Stones. That’s because a very limited amount of vinyl was being pressed in the UK in the 90s.

Aylesbury, UK | Record fair returns to Aylesbury’s Hop Pole pub in March: Aylesbury Record Fair is coming to town once again on Saturday, March 28. The event, which takes place at The Hop Pole pub, in Bicester Road will start at midday and finish at 4pm. Organised by record dealer and vinyl lover Mark Bradley, the fair features a large number of stalls over two rooms, and music enthusiasts will be sure to find something they like. Last time David and Sue Stopps of Aylesbury Friars club had a stall, selling surplus Friars posters from throughout the club’s history. There are also always fun DJ sets from players including music journalist Kris Needs, Hop Pole chef Mark Gerrard, Steamstock and Sammo. Mark Bradley said: “If the past events are anything to go by, this one is sure to be a great time. “We are going to have plenty of stalls, and some great music. Plus there will be food and drinks throughout the afternoon.”

Writer Nick Hornby On ‘High Fidelity’ And Pop Culture Obsession: “A while back, when the Dick and Barry and I agreed that what really matters is what you like, not what you are like, Barry proposed the idea of a questionnaire for prospective partners, a two- or three-page multiple-choice document that covered all the music, film, TV, book bases. It was intended, A, to dispense with awkward conversation and, B, to prevent a chap from leaping into bed with somebody who might, at a later date, turn out to have every Julio Iglesias record ever made. It amused us at the time, although Barry being Barry went one stage further; he compiled the questionnaire and presented it to some poor woman he was interested in, and she hit him with it. But there was an important and essential truth contained in the idea, and the truth was that these things matter, and it’s no good pretending that any relationship has a future if your record collections disagree violently or if your favorite films wouldn’t even speak to each other if they met at a party…”

This entry was posted in A morning mix of news for the vinyl inclined. Bookmark the permalink. Trackbacks are closed, but you can post a comment.
  • SUPPORTING YOUR LOCAL INDIE SHOPS SINCE 2007


  • Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text
  • Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text