In rotation: 2/25/21

Louisville, KY | Mr. Tees Record Store a lasting memory for Louisville’s music industry: The tunes of a local record store started flowing through the West Louisville community in the 1980s. Mr. Tees Record Store was the spot for local artists to find their beats and where gospel legends passed through the aisles. Willie Glover knows almost every tune of the gospel, from Douglas Miller, to his very own as the lead singer of the group Archie Dale and the Tones of Joy. ”We never could come up with a solid hit record,” Glover said. In 1985, he opened Mr. Tees Record Store, bringing hits to the shelves to make a living. ”The life of a music store is new music,” Glover said. “If you can get new music and get it first, then you can make some money.” …”Everyone knew about Mr. Tees,” she said. “We would listen to gospel music, then hear a song on 1240 LOVE and then WLLV. We would travel down there on Broadway and you’d go in there and get the feeling of physically putting your hands on the tapes and albums.”

Webster, PA | Webster’s Stax of Trax Records provides a variety of unique vinyls:  To see if I could stock up on some records for my collection, I visited the records section of Webster’s Bookstore and Cafe: Stax of Trax. Since returning to State College, I have been hunting for more vinyl record shops after checking out Music Underground last semester. When you Google “records shops in State College,” you find a decent amount of opportunities to purchase these musical collectibles. Though Stax of Trax appears as its own individual store on the web, it is actually inside Webster’s. Though I had been to the bookstore and cafe before, it turns out I hadn’t truly experienced all it has to offer. I always enjoy a good bookstore, and I have been to many all over the country, including Strand Book Store in New York City and Tattered Cover Book Store in Denver. Webster’s just seems different to me — but in a good way. I don’t know if it is the older bookstore aesthetic that intrigued me or the smell of food at the cafe, but I enjoy being at Webster’s. The whole store and the smell of old books gave me a bit of nostalgia.

Buffalo, NY | Remember the records? These few vinyl shops in Buffalo had them: Back in the 70s and 80s DJs and record enthusiasts only had a few places to go to get classic vinyl. The known retail record stores in Buffalo carried mostly mainstream music that was being played on the radio at the time. Before I became a DJ, I remember going to The “Record Theater” it was on Mian Street in Buffalo, back then 12-inch singles were $4.99, and I would go at least once a week to try to keep up with what was current. I soon found out, that for DJs to get a good deal on music, one of the places you had to go to, was right downstairs from the Record Theater, and it was called “One-Stop”, they sold music to DJs and people on the radio at a discounted price. The store many of us DJs went to has been around for well over 50-years and still stands as the oldest record store in Buffalo still in operation, Doris Records. I learned to hit up Doris Records when you wanted to get new music first in the 80s and 90s, Doris Records was one of my favorite places.

Lily Allen would have put her albums on vinyl “long ago” if she owned the masters: And she “had nightmares trying to get things pressed” for her 2018 record ‘No Shame’ Lily Allen has told fans she wishes she could have her albums repressed on vinyl. The singer was responding to a tweet after someone asked her about the possibility of getting her discography repressed, to which she revealed that she’s always wanted to but is unable to because she doesn’t own the master recordings. A fan wrote on Twitter: “lily pleeeeease press your records on vinyl again!!! we are BEGGING!!!!!!” with Allen replying: “if i owned the masters i would have done it long ago.” Allen added: “i had nightmares trying to get things pressed on NoShame, wanted to do limited edition of singles but was told it was too expensive.” Another fan wrote: “Can you not re-record them like Taylor? Or is that really expensive to do?” Allen responded: “perhaps. maybe one day.”

Asheford Reports Top Trends: Antique institute’s 2020 survey results show that Art Deco is the cat’s meow, modular ’70s furniture and smalls also popular in antiques and collectibles marketplace. …Moving up the charts, vinyl records continue to find new collectors. Classic albums and rare examples of original presses all posted strong sales, according to many of the survey’s respondents. Albums from the Rolling Stones, The Beatles, Elvis Presley, Bob Dylan, Queen, and the Sex Pistols topped the billboard again, but entries from less revered musical artists like Olivia Newton-John also presented well. Adding to the demand for old vinyl were also old vintage stereos and receivers. Equipment from the likes of Kenwood, McIntosh, Dynakit, Marantz and Pioneer were all reported as selling well in a growing market.

John Prine Talks Oh Boy Records in New Documentary About Label’s 40th Anniversary: In 1981, John Prine and his manager launched their own record label to directly serve Prine’s fans. Forty years later, Oh Boy Records is still in business, carrying on the musical legacy of Prine, who died last year due to Covid-19, and the artists he inspired. Oh Boy Records marks its anniversary in 2021 with a series of new projects, including a centerpiece documentary about the label’s origin and history. Via candid archival footage, Prine himself appears in the trailer for the film, talking about how he came up with the name. “When things are going really good, I can just go, ‘Oh boy, oh boy, oh boy, what a year we had!’ and when things ain’t so good, you go, ‘Oh boy…,” he said. Other subjects interviewed for the film include Todd Snider, who released albums on Oh Boy Records; Prine’s widow and president of the label, Fiona Whelan Prine; and Al Bunetta, Prine’s co-founder in Oh Boy. The documentary is planned to premiere as a series of mini-films on the label’s YouTube channel.

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  • SUPPORTING YOUR LOCAL INDIE SHOPS SINCE 2007


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