In rotation: 7/9/21

Warwick, NY | Record Store Day is Back at Original Vinyl Records: The Warwick shop is celebrating the RSD’s second drop on July 17 with free swag, giveaways, and more. Much to the excitement of vinyl-heads everywhere, Record Store Day, the beloved annual celebration of indie music retailers, has finally returned. Much like last year’s event, which was modified for the pandemic, this year’s event has been split into two separate “RSD Drops” days, the second of which is coming up next Saturday, July 17. And with the Hudson Valley’s recently eased restrictions, shops like Warwick’s Original Vinyl Records are welcoming Record Store Day devotees back in style. “Serious vinyl people make a pilgrimage out of Record Store Day,” says Jim Eigo, a 45-year veteran of the music industry who opened Original Vinyl Records in 2018. “Some of our regular customers may start out their day at a record store in Pennsylvania, drive to one in New Jersey, then head up to us.”

London, UK | A one-day pop-up record store giving away free vinyl is coming to London: Ahead of the next Record Store Day drop date on 17 July, a new pop-up record store called SMARTY Disc-overy store is coming to London for one day, and will offer each customer free vinyl. SMARTY Disc-overy store will launch in partnership with Record Store Day on 16 July, one day before the second RSD 2021 drop date, and will gift each customer one vinyl record each for free. The one-day pop-up does have a twist though, as customers won’t know what vinyl they’re getting as every vinyl will be covered. According to a press release, this is to encourage people to find new favourites. A variety of music will be available, from AJ Tracey to Ziggy Stardust, as well as rare, collectible albums and special editions. The store will also have listening stations for customers to play their latest additions, and an in-store DJ.

Wellington, OH | When cameras stop rolling, ‘White Noise’ murals must go: Wizard Records magically appeared more or less overnight on East Herrick Avenue, its yellow storefront advertising used tapes and vinyl. The side of the East Herrick store pops even more. It’s covered by a mural with the faces of Elton John, Jimi Hendrix, Elvis, Jerry Garcia and other rock ‘n’ roll legends. “I’d love to keep it. It’s brought a lot of people in here,” said Marti Folds, owner of Addie’s Antiques — that’s the real business inside the building, behind all the fancy new paint. Like many other storefronts, hers has been transformed as part of the fictional town of Blacksmith, where Netflix’s upcoming movie “White Noise” will be set. The record store isn’t the only faux business to materialize in Wellington in the past few weeks. There’s suddenly a hardware store, a movie theater, a comic book store, a laundromat and even a Radio Shack. …When done, village officials will require Netflix’s crew to reverse the Hollywood illusion it’s created and paint the buildings back in their original colors.

New York, NY | Frankie Knuckles’ record collection featured in new exhibit: With 5,000 LPs including test pressings, promos, and more. A selection of Frankie Knuckles’ extensive record collection — titled A Song For Frankie — is currently on show as part of group exhibit Social Works, at Gagosian Gallery’s Chelsea outpost in NYC. Presented by Theaster Gates, the installation features 5,000 records taken from Knuckle’s personal archive — including test pressings and promos. Many of the records are adorned with handwritten notes from his friends and peers, offering insight into the close knit bonds between DJs and friends. Alongside Gates’ installation, Social Works — curated by Antwaun Sargent — also includes work by David Adjaye, Kenturah Davis, and Linda Goode Bryan. A Song For Frankie follows Gates’ Black Image Corporation installation at 180 The Strand, as part of Prada Mode during 2019. Social Works will run at Gagosian until the 13th August.

Sarnia, CA | Couple packing up Sarnia’s record shop and preparing to retire: Sarnia’s Roland Peloza lived a dream for four decades as the owner of a record shop, although it was his second choice of a career. Sarnia’s Roland Peloza lived a dream for four decades as the owner of a record shop, although it was his second choice of a career. “My first choice was rock star but that didn’t work out,” said Peloza who, along with spouse and business partner Mary Anne, announced this week they will be closing Cheeky Monkey in Sarnia’s downtown and retire. The couple opened the record and video shop 22 years ago in Sarnia after 17 years of running a store in Wallaceburg. Mary Anne said they met as teenagers, and she remembers Roland telling her back then he wanted to own a record store someday. They started out with a video store in Wallaceburg and added records when customers began asking for soundtracks, but eventually moved to Sarnia following a bruising battle with a video chain.

Portland, OR | Local artist turns old vinyl records into Oregon works of art: With surgical precision, Vancouver artist Ty Givens knows how to excise it. Givens carves into vinyl records to produce stylish silhouettes of local landmarks, comics characters and more. “I tend to focus on things more local – sports, the area that I’m in – but I also have a nerdy side so I like to make things of anime, comic books, video games, things that people enjoy that make them happy,” Givens said. He sells his work under his brand, 2025th Street, which is not an actual street, but a nod to his first name, comprised of the 20th and 25th letters in the alphabet. Givens’ website includes a catalog of 50 different designs, featuring everything from Dr. Who and Star Trek, logos of the Timbers and Trail Blazers, to dozens of Pokémon characters. It takes a steady hand to slice clean lines through vinyl, and Givens uses a variety of tools, including a Dremel and drill, a wood burner with a heated utility blade and a needle file to create his work.

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