In rotation: 10/8/21

Newton, MA | Take a spin, discover new music at Newton’s Want List Records: For decades musicians from Pearl Jam and Joan Jett to Chuck Berry and Aerosmith have been singing the praises of vinyl. Even with the advent of digital music, record albums remain popular with generations of fans. Music lovers Dave Belson and Brian Coleman, co-owners of Want List Records which recently opened in the Mall at Echo Bridge, love watching people listen to a musician for the first time at their shop. “That discovery is amazing,” said Belson. The Newton resident has been selling records at shows before the COVID pandemic as well as online at the Want List Records website, which was created before the shop. “That first one … gets you down the rabbit hole,” said Coleman, who has written several nonfiction books including “Check the Technique,” which is used in Newton North’s Hip Hop Culture class. Both remember the first records they bought with their own money: a 45 (single) of “YMCA” by the Village People for Belson and “Synchronicity,” by the Police for Coleman, an Ashland resident.

McKinney, TX | In downtown McKinney, Red Zeppelin Records is expanding into a dive bar and music venue: “I’m OK with being the weird kid on the block,” says owner Katie Scott. Historic downtown McKinney is getting a music venue next year, the kind you would expect to see in Deep Ellum. Red Zeppelin record store is expanding into a dive bar with live music from local and touring bands, comparable to Three Links. Owner Katie Scott has already changed McKinney’s cultural district. She opened a vintage boutique shop, the Groovy Coop, in 2015 and a great record store, Red Zeppelin Records, in 2020. In January 2021, she expanded Red Zeppelin into a record label focused on up-and-coming artists from McKinney. The suburb has its own developing music scene that is distinct from other parts of North Texas, Scott says. “We do our own thing, and it’s hard to pigeonhole it with a genre,” Scott said. She says most of the artists are under 30 and their music explores all sorts of ‘80s and ‘90s rock trends, always with a dark undercurrent. “It’s just kind of turning into what it’s turning into, organically. But I think we’re going to see a surge of punk and grunge. We have a lot of skater kids who are in bands and went to School of Rock.”

Miami, FL | Where to find vinyl in Miami: In the age of streaming platforms, there’s really nothing like getting your hands on a vinyl record. It’s a physical representation an artist’s work and tracking down limited releases and pressings is a beautiful reminder of analog claiming its place in a digital world. For music enthusiasts in Miami, there are a variety of ways to take a dive into records, from retail to listening, here’s a quick look into Miami’s vinyl scene: DANTE’S HIFI New to Wynwood, Dante’s HiFi is Miami’s first listening bar and a special place for music lovers. Grab a drink and and enjoy a curated experience of sound. Inspired by similar concepts in Japan, this is not your typical Miami bar as education takes a front seat. As you embark on your musical journey, you’ll also learn more about what you’re listening to for a well-rounded stay. A smaller venue with a speakeasy feel, you’ll want to grab a reservation here. VINYL SOCIAL CLUB Looking to meet fellow record fans? Vinyl Social Club is your answer. A traveling vinyl party, you can find founder Danielle Hartless all over Miami. In an effort to create a collective of music lovers, Vinyl Social Club is where you can try your hand at spinning. Bring records and strut your stuff on the turntable.

UK | The 40 best albums to listen to before you die, from Madonna’s ‘Like a Prayer’ to The Beatles’ ‘Revolver’ When was the last time you listened to an old album from start to finish? With our ears set to shuffle since the death of the CD, only the vinyl fetishists seem to do it any more. Consequently we can end up believing we have solid opinions on records we may never have given our honest and sustained attention. I didn’t want to include Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon. Then I played it to my nine-year-old son, who doesn’t share any of my cultural baggage. Watching it blow his mind, I changed mine. So. This list is designed for anybody interested in extending their aural attention span and genuinely challenging their preconceptions. We’ve included classics and curveballs, because “to list” can also mean to tilt. Most of our personal favourites aren’t here, because we’ve tried to pick the records that broke new ground rather than those that refined old sounds.

5 Ways Music Can Make You a Better Student: …What’s better than coming home after a long, exhausting day, setting up your record player and relaxing to the sound of vinyl crackling? Are you into vinyl? Sure, everybody is. Not only is the sound different, you also pay much more attention to the music that’s playing. It’s similar to getting a cup of tea at Starbucks versus being a part of a tea ceremony. It’s a completely different experience indeed. Playing vinyl records can put you in an entirely different mood, help you unwind and leave the stressful day behind. And sure, a turntable is not something a student can normally afford. But if you’re determined, you can get a used one and restore it or find one in your parents’ or grandparents’ basement. The point is, if you’re really into music, it’s a worthy investment.

Smaller labels struggling to put out vinyl albums due to PVC shortage, major label reveals: “You have to adapt. But it’s a bit annoying,” says Kniteforce Record’s Chris Howell. Vinyl has seen a tremendous resurgence in popularity in the last decade, with many big-name artists now opting for a vinyl release alongside streaming. However, this spike in popularity has reportedly begun to affect smaller record labels. Kniteforce Record’s Chris Howell spoke to The Guardian on the matter, stating that while business for vinyl may be booming, major labels getting in on the action and a shortage of pressing plants capable of meeting the demand means he’s not likely to receive any more 12-inch vinyls this year. This is despite having 60 different vinyl releases at different stages of production. Chris told The Guardian, “I’ve gone from eight to nine releases a month to none,” a major concern when smaller labels are leveraging on vinyl releases to make ventures profitable, as opposed to digital platforms like streaming.

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