Needle Drop: Evanescence,
The Bitter Truth

It’s “dark and heavy” said Amy Lee, the creative force behind one of the most successful rock bands of a generation, during an “ask me anything” on Reddit in November of 2019. However Evanescence was about to have their long-awaited comeback plans thrown into chaos. Blindsided by what would turn out to be a seemingly never-ending pandemic that put the entertainment world on hold, it’s finally time for The Bitter Truth to make its debut this Friday (3/26). After one listen, you would think that this record was written and recorded with some knowledge of what was about to happen in the future; a world plunged into uncertainty.

It’s been 18 years since Evanescence took the world by storm with their seven times platinum debut Fallen. Many threw them into the “nu-metal” camp, but the band would quickly outgrow that label and evolve with a more polished industrial gothic sound. Along the way, they’ve delivered a masterclass in staying connected with fans and calling their own shots by not allowing a major record label to dictate their sound or their release schedule.

While this record is not necessarily one that I would have dropped everything to go listen to immediately, lockdown has kept me open to trying new things. So I dropped the needle on this one straight away and listened from start to finish. Right from the beginning, The Bitter Truth brings the listener back to a late ’90s industrial feel where Stabbing Westward, Linkin Park, and Gravity Kills ruled the world of alt-rock. Claiming a return to their roots is a bit cliched for any band at this stage of their career, so I’m not going to go there, but I will say the formula that blasted them into superstardom is alive and well. I think in this case, it’s a band keeping close tabs on their fans and giving them exactly what they want.

It does take a minute to get going on this one, but once I flipped to side B of the first record, it was off to the races. There are some serious grooves happening here along with some unexpected surprises in terms of songwriting. “Yeah Right” and “Feeding the Dark” are easily the strongest songs on the record, but “Wasted on You” is the one that gets stuck in your head with its almost throwback chorus.

“Better Without You” is one of the heaviest tracks on the record, with its nu-metal groove complemented by the signature soaring chorus reminiscent of the band’s first album. “Far From Heaven” is an interesting one that almost feels out of place—a ballad nestled between the riff-heavy predecessors—but it’s a nice break that showcases Lee’s softer side while almost teetering into new age.

All in, this is a solid record that will clearly please the massive fanbase who’ve been patiently waiting for this one, and I would be interested in seeing the live show, which will hopefully get rescheduled later this year. Hats off to Sony/ Columbia, who have done a spectacular job with the packaging—double gatefold with some very cool artwork throughout and two heavy vinyl LPs over which the music is stretched.

This entry was posted in The TVD Storefront. Bookmark the permalink. Trackbacks are closed, but you can post a comment.
  • SUPPORTING YOUR LOCAL INDIE SHOPS SINCE 2007


  • Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text
  • Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text