Author Archives: Special to TVD

Charles Newman,
The TVD First Date

“I grew up in the late ’70s, which was the heart of vinyl culture.”

“As I turned 10 years old the disco era was in full swing, and so were my parents disco lessons where they would spin Gloria Gaynor and Earth Wind & Fire around the house. Around that time my uncle gave me The Beatles’ red and blue albums and an original pressing of The White Album and my collection began to grow. In the early 80’s I worked all kinds of teenager type jobs so I could make regular trips to The Music Machine, a local Baltimore record shop where I would mostly buy 7-inches and the occasional velvet glow-in-the-dark poster.

Around that time I started piano lessons and joined my first band. As a keyboard player in the early ’80s I was embracing the synthesizer movement, but during an infamous all-night hang with some friends in 10th grade, I saw Pink Floyd’s The Wall on a big screen TV and that changed everything.

Read More »

Posted in The TVD Storefront | Leave a comment

KOPPS,
The TVD First Date

“Growing up in a mid-sized, rust-belt city produced an experience we can only imagine was matched by any other middle-class American city: angsty teenagers listening to punk and hardcore, going to shows and buying obscure 7” records from the band passing through on whatever night the local promoters decided to book a show.”

“Our story is no different; it’s how my collection started. Round up any and all of the records you could at every show. Every subsequent trip to the record store was unique and exciting. ‘What will I find today?’ As high school progressed so did my tastes, moving from hardcore and punk to more ‘refined’ things like indie rock. The smaller the label, the weirder the cover art (surely coming stock with sound to match,) the more it felt like I was in on some big secret, or in an exclusive club, but one I couldn’t wait to talk about or share with my friends. Or anyone else who would listen.

Fast forward to college when musical tastes begin to expand and blossom—the sounds became more experimental, more underground, harder to find, or maybe they were just the deeper cuts from favorite pop, R&B, hip hop, or rock artists. The internet could now lead you down a rabbit hole you would follow from your computer screen to the record store where you would dig into every crate until you found those bizarre and left of center records—the ones you know aren’t a dime a dozen or found in the dollar bin of your local thrift store. Your membership to the club you joined in high school was just renewed for life.

Read More »

Posted in The TVD Storefront | Leave a comment

Talker,
The TVD First Date

“My mom had a pretty sizable record collection growing up, and I always loved the look of them, and the stories she had for each record—how she found it, when she bought it, who gifted it to her, when she listened to it.”

“I think the special thing about vinyl records is that, while all music no matter the format will carry with it some sort of emotional association and connection, there’s nothing like thumbing through a box of used vinyl at a flea market—the sounds, the smells, the angle of the sun—you don’t get any of that digitally. It sounds super nostalgic and like I’m romanticizing the past, but those experiences really add a tangible extension of emotion.

Plus, as a teenager I became obsessed with putting the album covers on my wall. That’s the best part for me—vinyl records come with built-in visual art! You can’t put a Spotify playlist on your wall. In high school, I had a whole installation on my wall that included Who’s Next, Led Zeppelin II, The Doors, The Joshua Tree, and a bunch of others. I loved it. There’s just a heightened level of self-expression that vinyl gives you.

Read More »

Posted in The TVD Storefront | Leave a comment

Roman Lewis,
The TVD First Date

“My first memory of records was opening up this big cupboard my grandma has and finding a hundred of them packed on top of one another. I looked through it and didn’t recognise much so discarded them and forgot about it pretty quickly.”

“A couple of years later I got a record player for my 14th birthday. To make the most out of it I bought a record I had been listening to on repeat on Spotify called I’m Wide Awake It’s Morning by Bright Eyes. When the postman brought it to the door in its Amazon packaging, I couldn’t imagine the importance of the moment.

I went upstairs and placed the needle on the outer edge of side A and 45 minutes later I honestly felt like a different person. To that point I had never listened to an album in order. My listening ways were governed by that blasphemous shuffle button, but after finally listening to the songs I knew so well in the order they were meant to be heard, music for me was given a whole new meaning.

A song is a great medium for storytelling, but there’s only so much you can say in 5 minutes, whereas if you look at the song as the chapter and the album as the story, you can do a whole lot more.

Read More »

Posted in The TVD Storefront | Leave a comment

Katey Brooks,
The TVD First Date

“The first record I ever bought was when I was 5 years old. My mum used to take my sisters and I to a lot of car boot sales as kids where we’d find all kinds of gems to take home for next to nothing.”

“That day I found a record player. I’m not even sure I even quite knew what it was, but I liked the way it looked and smelled. The lady sold it to me along with two records (to this day I’ve no idea what they were) for £2. I was so excited to get the record player home so I could listen to the music.

That evening I put it in the middle of my bedroom and blasted the records out of the open window over and over again (my poor neighbours). I just remember feeling really good. I was enthralled by the sound. I wish I knew who was playing! I feel like it was most probably someone like Roy Orbison or Elvis because I can still vividly remember the rich texture of the vocal, but I can’t be sure.

After many house moves, somewhere along the way I lost that record player and moved on to tapes for a while, which were equally exciting to me. I loved the sleeves and being able to read the lyrics inside. Specially people like Tracy Chapman and Michael Jackson whose lyrics I always found fascinating.

Read More »

Posted in The TVD Storefront | Leave a comment

Dirty Heads,
The TVD First Date

“In my personal opinion vinyl should be considered the fifth element. Earth, wind, fire, water, vinyl.”

“Playing music on vinyl seems to change the particles in the room. When you walk into a home and vinyl is playing, you can feel it in the air. It’s warm; it has a weight to it. It’s like using your AC unit compared to opening all your windows—a natural breeze feels better than your AC unit. Music on vinyl feels better than any other format. You always hear people say music “feels “ better played on vinyl, and I think that’s completely true.

Reggae music is what made me start collecting vinyl because you couldn’t find certain artists on any other musical format. Bob Marley’s Legend was the gateway album that took me down a deep rabbit hole of reggae. From dancehall Djs like Big Youth, Michigan & Smiley, and Yellowman to rocksteady groups like The Gaylads, The Wailers, and The Melodians.

Read More »

Posted in The TVD Storefront | Leave a comment

Daniel Steinbock,
The TVD First Date

“When I was 7 years-old, I was the only one in my family who listened to vinyl. My mom had held onto about 50 of her favorite records from the ’60s and ’70s and they’d sat on a bookshelf, unplayed, for the duration of my short life thus far. I didn’t even know what the things were, mentally lumping them in with my parents’ outsized collection of cookbooks and Time Life volumes on arcane subjects outside of my childhood universe.”

“That is, until the day my Mom brought home a second-hand record player. She’d bought it on a whim, thinking it’d be fun to give her old records a spin. I watched in rapt attention as she taught me how to pull the vinyl out of its sleeve without scratching it and how to place the needle gently at the edge of the spinning black disc. A scratchy silence burst from her old Pioneer speakers and a new world opened up to me.

Over the following days and weeks, I worked my way through my Mom’s collection, one record at a time: J.S. Bach’s Goldberg Variations, Guantanamera by The Sandpipers, albums by The Kingston Trio, Peter, Paul and Mary, the Limeliters, Glenn Yarbrough, (so much Glenn Yarbrough…). My Mom’s tastes leaned heavily toward the early ’60s folk ensembles. I’d put each record on and then explore the album jacket inside and out, reading every word of the liner notes, transported by the beat poet language and tales from recording studios decades earlier. Sitting cross-legged on the living room carpet, eyes lost in the cover art on my lap, voices from other times sang from the Pioneer speakers and pulled me into imaginary realms of my own making.

After dipping into all of the albums in my Mom’s collection, I found a handful of favorites that I would return to in the months and years to come. Among these, one record stood above all others in my esteem; one record I played over and over with loving obsession: Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band by The Beatles.

Read More »

Posted in The TVD Storefront | Leave a comment

Ciaran Lavery,
The TVD First Date

“The first time I held a record in my hands I was younger than 8 years old, but no less than that.”

“I had travelled with my dad to see my uncle Paul and his old shaggy dog Shane, who I believed to be part dog, part human, as was his nature to seem so wise and all-knowing. I was standing in the middle of what was the living room on a carpet that looked as old and world-weary as Shane, but had a surprisingly springy feeling underfoot. I remember vibrant colours of red and egg yolk yellow and a truly unique pattern that ran consistently from the centre of the room, sprawling to each corner in designs that I could make no sense of, but figured such understanding of tastes were outside of my lesser learned child brain. Perhaps I would choose a carpet exactly like this one if I were a fully formed adult; I could only assume.

My uncle Paul reached over and handed me this square, card like material as I stood shipwrecked in the middle of the room, and unknowingly I was holding my very first vinyl. It was white with an elaborate design and I treated it as you would some ancient antique, my mind exploding with the visual feast in front of me. I kept turning the record in my hands, from front to back and repeating the process, keen to take in every detail.

Read More »

Posted in The TVD Storefront | Leave a comment

Rachel Ana Dobken,
The TVD First Date

“With CDs on the O-U-T, it pains me to think people don’t appreciate the art of listening to a record anymore. But, I have hope that the resurgence of vinyl means otherwise. I’m hoping people still give a shit about a record in its entirety as a work of art. This is something I think about a lot. So much time and energy goes into putting together a record knowing its meant to exist as a whole body of work. When It Happens To You, my newest LP is an extension of that entire sentiment.”

“For me, I don’t enjoy listening to NEW records on vinyl as much as I do the OLD. I appreciate the process of acquiring used vinyl, romanticizing the history and sentimental value behind it, especially your parents’ old ones! Just imagining (and longing for) the simpler times in the world and music industry. I can’t even imagine what it was like to put on Music From Big Pink for the first time or Dark Side Of The Moon. Music was consumed in such simpler ways in the ’60s, gather round with your friends and listen to the entire record. “Hey Donna got the new Neil Young record! We’re meeting at her place after school to listen!” It became a whole event, a means of savoring and taking your time with the music. IT was special and the artist was appreciated for the art itself.

I love popping on jazz (especially bebop) records for the similar reasons. Monk (At Town Hall), Mingus, Bill Evans (Conversations With Myself—this one I’ve been searching for)… even some weird Jazz Fusion one offs. There is something to be said about listening/consuming music in the way it was meant to be heard at that time. It affected the way somebody played, the caliber of expectation, and seriousness (or perhaps lack of but that as part of the beauty) in doing a take and getting it right.

Read More »

Posted in The TVD Storefront | Leave a comment

Elise Hayes,
The TVD First Date

“My love for records and record stores began as a small child in my living room.”

“My dad had this cabinet full of old records that as a pastime, I would sift through and pick out the ones with the prettiest covers. I remember the day that he showed me what an actual record was. How to carefully handle it, place it on the turntable, and delicately lift the needle to start the music. As I became more and more involved with music, I really came to appreciate his collection. The Beatles, Paul Simon, Joni Mitchell, James Taylor—it was responsible for my personal discovery of all of these iconic artists.

As I grew older, there was a record store down the street from my house called Turn it Up in Keene, NH. I would go there, and sift through everything they had. You could play them before purchasing, so I would sit there for hours, listening. I slowly developed a total obsession with R&B and soul music. Aretha Franklin, Stevie Wonder, Gladys Knight, anything from that era—I was completely hooked. I had never felt such a fire listening to music as I did when I was listening to those artists. The passion and energy behind what they were singing about was contagious. You could feel it on such a visceral level.

Read More »

Posted in The TVD Storefront | Leave a comment

Ivy Mairi,
The TVD First Date

“I’ve been casually collecting records since moving out on my own when I was 18.”

“Not long after I got my first apartment, I found an old Dual turntable from the ’70s on the street. A friend (who already had a massive vinyl collection) helped me get it fixed, and set up a full audio system with a vintage receiver and speakers from Ring Audio, in Toronto’s east end. I think my parents paid for it for my 19th birthday, or something like that. It felt like a big growing-up moment! I still use that setup 10 years later, and it still sounds great.

I do buy new vinyl, but my collection mostly consists of ’70s and ’80s stuff. I love ’70s British folk revival albums from groups like Fairport Convention and Steeleye Span. I have a great copy of Control by Janet Jackson that I’ve played over and over. Recently I’ve been loving Breakout by the Pointer Sisters—that one belongs to my roommate. Of my new vinyl, one of my favourites is Free Will by Bry Webb. I like to put that one on and just be quiet.

Read More »

Posted in The TVD Storefront | Leave a comment

Mad Crush,
The TVD First Date

Mad Crush lead guitarist Mark Whelan worked at New World Records, a small independent shop in Charlotte, NC, in the late ’80s and early ’90s. He reflects on his time behind the counter.Ed.

“Being surrounded by vinyl, listening to records all day expanded my taste, which is what I wanted.”

“Opportunities to explore music were scarce then, when you could only hear what was on the radio or what friends owned, or what you could afford to buy. Maybe it was a bit more exciting to listen to something the first time because of the ceremony it required—taking a record home, pulling off the shrink-wrap, and laying around on the floor or couch listening while studying the album cover. Record stores are part of that treasure hunt, the feeling that something fascinating was probably lurking in a bin somewhere.

I’m still processing all the music I heard from back then, its impact has lasted, and I still keep trying to understand its basic elements. Music all seemed so complicated at first, as if no two genres had anything in common. Now I see things much more in terms of colors and rhythms and phrasing and sonic atmospheres, across genres—and the basic ingredients are shared across the different types.

Read More »

Posted in The TVD Storefront | Leave a comment

Charlene Soraia,
The TVD First Date

“When I was a child I used to flip through my parents record collection and stare at the covers. I don’t think I could even read, let alone understand that they somehow played music, but I do remember always getting to Rumours by Fleetwood Mac and flipping it over to stare at Stevie Nicks, whom I believed to be Lindsay Buckingham, the most beautiful woman in the world! You can imagine how confused I was many years later when I found out that Stevie and Lindsay were the other way round! But alas, this piece isn’t about Fleetwood Mac, it’s about vinyl and my strange little journey with it!”

“I was fascinated with my parents record collection when I was little, I’m not sure if it was the colours on these giant squares, or the smell, but both still satisfy me greatly. There was a lot of David Bowie, The Police, Kraftwerk, Bob Dylan, Prince, and Bob Marley in my parents’ record collection and every now and again new records would pop into the pile and others would go, sometimes they came back, but I eventually learnt how they worked and it was definitely some kind of witchcraft!

I vividly remember one LP turning up in the pile and thinking, “This is the ugliest thing I’ve ever seen, I bet the music is just as ugly,” so I never gave it a chance. It had the scariest picture of a man screaming and it frightened the crap outta me! The inside of the gatefold was just as disturbing with vivid colours that were kinda freaky, so I never played that LP, I never knew the name of the band or the record. I claimed a bunch of my Dad’s records when he and my Mum broke up, one being an extremely old Disney LP, which was actually my Dad’s first record! I was given some Beatles records as a teenager and lots of gifts from people twice my age to listen to, but the first LPs I bought with my own money were actually a couple of 13th Floor Elevators picture discs.

Read More »

Posted in The TVD Storefront | Leave a comment

Novo Amor,
The TVD First Date

“Growing up in the age of CDs—which quickly turned into the age of mp3s and illegal downloads—my interest in owning vinyl only arrived once I hit around twenty years old.”

“I think my first vinyl purchase was the album Early In The Morning by James Vincent McMorrow. It soundtracked my 2011 and 2012 and was a turning point in my musical tastes. I was never much into traditional Irish or Celtic folk, so to hear banjo, mandolin, and acoustic guitar arranged around melancholy pop songs was just incredibly refreshing at the time. Songs like ‘We Don’t Eat’ and ‘Hear The Noise That Moves So Soft And Low’ really inspired my writing style back when I first started recording. This record ushered me into the worlds of Keaton Henson, William Fitzsimmons, Fleet Foxes, Bon Iver etc.

I would occasionally visit old record stores around Cardiff and pick up cheap vinyl of artists I knew but hadn’t given much of a chance to. I’d essentially be judging a book by it’s cover, which was fine when I was going home with Fleetwood Mac, Art Garfunkel, and Carpenters records for 50 pence a pop.

Read More »

Posted in The TVD Storefront | Leave a comment

Cooper & Gatlin,
The TVD First Date

“One of my favorite things in the world is putting on an album where I love every song, top to bottom. That’s the criteria for my vinyl collection, actually. There’s no skipping songs, so I better love the whole thing.”

“The first album I ever felt this way about was Parachutes by Coldplay. I had just started playing guitar, and I felt like I was actually paying attention to music for the first time. I think something about starting to learn how music worked helped me recognize and articulate what I liked. Parachutes was the first time I ever realized how much I could be impacted by music. It wasn’t just a song or two, it was an album as one piece of work.

Flashing forward a bit, Parachutes is a great connecting point with my sister/band mate, Gatlin. We both love/resonate with the album for different reasons, and it was one of the first times our musical tastes overlapped. Really, I think we both just want to be more like Chris Martin. Or, maybe that’s just me. Either way, Parachutes was the first of many albums that would impact me this way, but you can never forget the first one.”
Cooper Green

Read More »

Posted in The TVD Storefront | Leave a comment
  • SUPPORTING YOUR LOCAL INDIE SHOPS SINCE 2007


  • Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text
  • Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text