TVD Los Angeles

TVD’s The Idelic Hour with Jon Sidel

Greetings from Laurel Canyon!

I dosed and became invisible / A compilation of my dreams / Exploded in my sleep / Now there’s nothing left of me

I can’t seem to remember more than one or two Idelic Hours that landed on a Friday the 13th. I like number 13. After all, I was born on the 13th of December, so I can relate. I don’t find the number eerie or superstitious, just cool. This said, I grew up on the 12th floor of an apartment building in New York City and above us was the 14th floor—New York’s a city with no 13th floors. Strange thought but, does a 13th floor exist anywhere?

It got me thinking about a playlist of songs that are an album’s track number 13. To be honest, it’s too fucking hot in my garage to deal with digging for long player favorites in search of 13s. Instead this set pays tribute to track 13s of the future. Maybe the question is, will track 13s even exist in the future or simply become invisible? With streaming and millennial short attention spans, will  those “#13s” become as extinct as 13th floors themselves?

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TVD Washington, DC

TVD Live: Taylor Swift at FedExField, 7/10

PHOTOS: RICHIE DOWNSDespite the dizzying confluence of torches, fireworks, lights, immense video screens, dancing squads, light-up fan wristbands, and three-story snakes—so many snakes—in Taylor Swift’s big “Reputation” stadium tour, the best moment comes when she’s finally alone with the guitar.

It happens just over halfway in her two hour extravaganza when she’s on a B-stage, having been airlifted there by a light-up gondola while singing “Delicate.” It’s after the giddy heights of “Shake It Off” alongside tour openers Charli XCX and Camila Cabello (as well as another of those giant snakes) all while the fans’ wristband lights involuntarily blink Christmas colors.

Only then is she able to talk more to her fans as if they were old college buddies (“I’ve been thinking of you guys”). At the first of two sold out shows at Maryland’s FedEx Field for what she said was her 24th show in the area, she thanked fans for allowing her to go from teenage country sweetheart to high-volume pop music force. But she returned to her acoustic guitar roots all the same, with a spare version of “So It Goes…” from the new album and something from her Red album a half dozen years back that she hasn’t played for a while, “State of Grace.”

It was the rare moment of surprise and intimacy in a massive show whose every moment is plotted for maximum crowd convulsion. It’s audacious for a show this big to still largely be a vehicle to sell a new album, and playing 12 songs from Reputation (skipping only three of its tracks) meant squishing old favorites into medleys.

It was all fine with the audience of young girls, their indulgent parents, and a few guys, all excited for the big show and some decked out in a kind of Taylor cosplay, which ran from the troubling sight of grade schoolers in fishnets and lipstick to someone in full witch costume to one old guy in what looked to be an exploded newspaper.

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The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve:
Wire,
Document and Eyewitness

Sound reads from the archives, all summer long.Ed.

When informed of Wire’s plans to reissue Document and Eyewitness Geoff Travis, known the world over as the man who started Rough Trade (the label and the shops) retorted that the group was “completely mad.” This wouldn’t be especially significant except it was Travis who put up pounds to release the damned thing in the first place. This small anecdote is a big tipoff that Wire’s 1981 live LP, notorious to many and beloved by a few, is really quite special. On August 18th Pink Flag’s expanded multi-format edition will again illuminate the range and polarization of opinion.

I retain a fluctuating level of esteem for the live record, but as worthy captured performances continue to occasionally hit the racks it’s hard to deny that the form’s best days are basically behind it. To my ear the neck-and-neck contenders for the finest non-jazz live set ever waxed came relatively soon after the format’s invention, taped in ’62 and ’64 respectively; James Brown’s Live at the Apollo and Jerry Lee Lewis’ Live at the Star Club, Hamburg. These aren’t controversial choices of course, but they do amplify what’s missing from the vast majority of live records and why most are little more than artistic victory laps/obligatory pop and rock star rites of passage/bones tossed into the salivating yawp of easily satisfied fans.

Surely many early live discs were to varying levels studio-massaged sleight of hand, but in the cases of Brown and Lewis it was their abilities as performers that ultimately made those albums so massive. Plus, each slab possesses further crucial qualities in abundance; danger, uncertainty, surprise, and a legit sense of vérité. Document and Eyewitness is one of the only records I can recall a paid store employee vociferously steering me away from buying, said occasion circa-’88, with the extent of my Wire knowledge then consisting of “12XU” and a Peel Session. Based on that slim exposure I was eager for more, doubly so since Wire’s Harvest-EMI stuff was pretty scarce in my neck of the woods.

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The TVD Storefront

TVD Radar: 40 Years
in the Making: The Magic Music Movie
in theaters 8/3 (NY) and 8/10 (LA)

VIA PRESS RELEASE | Magic Music is one of the most fondly remembered bands of the Boulder Revolution of the late ’60s and early ’70s. Living in a makeshift camp up in the mountains, they would delight local residents and university students with their original songs, acoustic instruments, and light harmonies; their growing popularity brought them to the brink of success more than once. Unfortunately, they never signed a record deal and eventually broke up in 1975.

40 Years in the Making: The Magic Music Movie chronicles how one of their greatest fans, acclaimed director (and UC Boulder alumnus) Lee Aronsohn, tracked down the original band members four decades later to tell their story. More importantly, he makes a dream come true for himself, fellow fans, and the band, by bringing them all back to Boulder for a sold-out reunion concert that preserves their legacy for posterity.

40 Years in the Making: The Magic Music Movie opens in theaters on August 3 with additional markets to follow. The Orchard will release the film digitally on September 4. The film is written and directed by Emmy-nominated writer-producer Lee Aronsohn (Two and a Half Men, Big Bang Theory) and produced by Fleur Saville. Executive Producers are Aronsohn and Lisa Haisha and Producer is Jeff Jampol. Cinematography is by Dean Cornish with editing by Kyle Vorbach.

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The TVD Storefront

My Brothers and I,
The TVD First Date

“I had a vinyl collection before I had an actual record player. I’d go to a record store and see a cool LP from an artist I really enjoy or an old school best seller on discount and figured I should buy it, because I’d eventually get something to play this thing on.”

“After some time, and as my personal collection of unlistenable vinyl got a little bigger, my parents took out their collection from the attic to basically quadruple what I had accumulated. I’d spend hours just looking at the covers, opening up the albums and reading the descriptions. (Still no listening).

Around the same time, my grandparents had begun the process of moving homes. As it just so worked out, they discovered a record player that they had in storage that they weren’t using. They asked if I had a record player, to which we all know by now was a no, and gifted me their old one. It was in need of a new needle, but otherwise was in great condition.

I researched record player needles on the internet and found one that I thought would work. Well, as it turns out they don’t make some types of needles anymore, because they don’t make some types of record players anymore either—so why would they? Anywho, I ordered it online and checked the mailbox everyday for nearly a week.

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The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve:
Dixie Dregs,
Free Fall

Talk about your supposedly fun things I’ll never do again; it would take a million chimpanzees playing electrical instruments 100,000 years to make the ungodly synthesis of southern rock and progressive rock work, and I am here to tell you that Augusta, Georgia’s Dixie Dregs are not those chimpanzees.

The amazing thing? I used to OWN this band of daring genre blenders’ sophomore LP, 1977’s Free Fall. What’s more, I actually listened to the damn thing. I simply cannot come up with a more glaring example of the dangers of rampant marijuana abuse.

Oh, and have I mentioned that the Dixie Dregs play nothing but instrumentals? They don’t want the warming sound of an actual human voice to distract you from paying close attention to all of the whizz-bang playing. Or the best education in musical theory and composition a couple of degrees from Georgia State University can buy. Who needs Ronnie Van Zant when you’ve studied with Alice Shields? She’s a bona fide protege of Wendy Carlos!

But about the whole southern rock/prog fusion thing: It’s more or less a red herring. The Dixie Dregs attempt the impossible on only two tracks, and both tracks are less Dixie than dregs.

“Moe Down” works if your taste in hoedowns runs towards Aaron Copland. This isn’t the kind of thing you’ll want to square dance to. This is the kind of thing you’ll want to take notes on for your advanced course in The Cooption and Trivialization of Appalachian Culture. Talk about your aesthetic distance; the Dixie Dregs might as well be looking at southern culture from Mars.

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A morning mix of news for the vinyl inclined

In rotation: 7/13/18

The album at 70: A format in decline? …With lower revenue from recordings, album royalties aren’t the pension plan they once were, but the broader consecration of popular music as a heartbeat of 20th and 21st century culture extends far beyond the artists themselves. Anniversary coverage has proliferated — 20 years of OK Computer; 30 years of Bad; 70 years of ‘the album’. And there’s ever renewed interest in concertising albums whose creators have died or split up — reproducing a classic album live in the same way an orchestra might do with a classical score.

Los Angeles, CA | Capitol Studios’ Mastering King Goes Out on a Vinyl High. Says Ron McMaster, who retires on July 12, of making records: “The fact that it’s still strong blows my mind.” There’s a theory dubbed “nominative determinism,” a fancy name to describe people who gravitate to jobs that fit their names. You could hardly find a better example than the man who has sat alongside a mixing console and vinyl lathe in one of the basement studios in the Capitol Records tower for more than three decades. “What better name for a mastering engineer than… Ron McMaster!” says Ben Blackwell, the co-founder of Third Man Records, who has worked with the veteran on several projects. “Look up his credit on the Demolition Doll Rods’ first album — it’s my favorite listing on a record ever.” A quick scan of the credits reveals the listing burned into Blackwell’s memory: “Masterfully Mastered by the Master at Tower Mastering — Ron McMaster.”

Te Awamutu, NZ | Vinyl junkie in Te Awamutu for weekend fair: A self-described “record junkie” is bringing his travelling fair back to Te Awamutu for the third time in 10 years. Brian Wafer runs record fairs around the North Island and is hosting one at the Scout Hall on Saturday. The New Plymouth man has been collecting records for more than 50 years. The first song he ever listened to on vinyl was All My Loving by The Beatles at the age of 10. “It was one of the only ways to listen to music back then,” Brian says. “It’s still the best way to listen to music now.”

London, ENG | Twickenham Record Fair to raise money for charity: St Mary’s Church Hall will host the second Twickenham Record Fair later this month. The fair is organised by Eel Pie Records shop and vinyl lover Steve Sutton. It will feature 24 tables loaded with collectible vinyl from specialist traders presenting a massive selection of records. The event is free to the public, but there is a voluntary £1 contribution to go towards Shooting Star Chase. June’s fair raised almost £600 for the charity. Doors open at 9am and the Fair will run until 4:30pm.

Fourteen Genesis albums set for vinyl reissue: A total of 14 Genesis studio albums will be reissued on heavyweight vinyl next month via UMC / Virgin EMI. Trespass (1970), Nursery Cryme (1971), Foxtrot (1972), Selling England By The Pound (1973), The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway (1974), A Trick Of The Tail (1976), Wind & Wuthering (1976), …And Then There Were Three (1978), Duke (1980), Abacab (1981), Genesis (1983), Invisible Touch (1986), We Can’t Dance (1991) and Calling All Stations (1997) will all feature the original artwork and come with a download card. The only record not included in the series is the band’s 1968 debut From Genesis To Revelation.

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TVD UK

TVD Live Shots: Run DMC and Slick Rick at the Eventim Apollo, 7/5

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame legends Run DMC made a triumphant return to London last week marking their first gig in the UK in three years. Taking the stage at the famed Eventim Apollo, MC Darryl “DMC” McDaniels, Joseph “Run” Simmons, and Jason Mizell Jr. (who performs as DJ Jam Master J’Son, the son of the late DJ Jam Master Jay) brought the near-capacity crowd back to a time when hip hop was only just beginning to take over the world. I have never seen Run DMC live, and this would be my first time photographing a hip hop show—and it was one for the ages.

The importance of Run DMC cannot be understated. The list of firsts is second to none. They were the first rappers on MTV, the first rappers on Saturday Night Live, the first rappers on the cover of Rolling Stone, the first rappers to win a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. They single-handedly, seamlessly fused two genres to start a revolution and to breathe new life into a rock ‘n’ roll band on a downward spiral. They would ultimately become one of the most influential acts in the history of hip hop culture, and one of the most famous hip hop acts of all time.

Opening the night was British born American rapper and legend in his own right Slick Rick, aka Rick the Ruler. Rick is known for his storytelling abilities and as a pioneer in adding narratives to hip hop. Although he never really broke through to mainstream success as a solo artist, his music has been sampled and interpolated over 600 times, in over 35 songs, by artists including many of the biggest names in hip hop. Rick took to the stage in his signature throne and wowed the crowd with a selection of old school classics that would not only warm up the crowd for the headliner, but set the stage and the mood for an epic headlining set.

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The TVD Storefront

TVD Radar: Mobb Deep, Juvenile Hell 25th anniversary vinyl reissues in stores now

VIA PRESS RELEASE | You cannot mention rap’s most timeless duos without naming Mobb Deep. To celebrate the 25thAnniversary of their monumental debut release Juvenile Hell, Urban Legends/UMe released both a standard black vinyl LP and a limited edition red vinyl pressing of this iconic release. This is the first time that Juvenile Hell has been available on vinyl, and both versions can be ordered at shop.urbanlegends.com.

Originally named Poetical Prophets, Havoc and Prodigy turned heads in 1991 through The Source magazine’s now legendary “Unsigned Hype” column. As a production unit and a rap troupe, the pair displayed know-how and insight well beyond their years, making it easy to forget that both Havoc and Prodigy were in their late teens in 1993 when Juvenile Hell was released. Raw, unrelenting, and overtly-confident, Juvenile Hell was the infant stages of what would be defined as the Queensbridge Sound—grimy street narratives over cold, sonorous production underpinned with bravado and melancholy.

The prodigious pair were keenly aware of their career stage and brought in established producers to help aid the album, namely DJ Premier on the minimal, angst-filled thumper “Peer Pressure” and Large Professor whose remix of said track gave it an extra shot in the arm. The homespun music video was a local TV hit and “Hit It From The Back,” a track produced by Prodigy and Method Max, also charted at No. 18 on the Hot Rap Singles chart in 1993.

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The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve:
Small Faces,
From the Beginning

Sound reads from the archives, all summer long.Ed.

The Small Faces stand as one of the very finest groups of the 1960s, though many know them mainly for Ogden’s Nut Gone Flake, their most ambitious and final album before Steve Marriott’s departure effectively ended their diminutive phase. The scoop is that all of the Small Faces’ ‘60s records are worthy of ownership, even the mercantile odds-and-ends collection From the Beginning. That disc and its self-titled predecessor are currently available as 180gm replica LPs. Are they cut to lacquer from the original quarter-inch production masters with front-laminated sleeves? Why yes indeed.

One gauge of the true greats is that the music manages to get better, or at least maintains a high standard of quality, as the discs take their place in the racks. So it is with the Small Faces. With this said the Decca period offers distinct and enduring appeal; more so than The Who, the Small Faces circa-’65-’66 are the true ambassadors of Mod. Utterly Brit in orientation, it wasn’t until the fourth LP that the group entered the US market.

The Small Faces consisted of Steve Marriott on vocals, guitar and harmonica, Ronnie Lane on bass, Kenney Jones on drums and percussion, and initially Jimmy Winston on keyboards. Upon signing to Decca through the efforts of manager Don Arden, they released two singles in ’65. The first “What’cha Gonna Do about It” charted, hitting #14, while the second “I’ve Got Mine” didn’t. Shortly thereafter, Winston was replaced by Ian McLagan, the new keyboardist assisting 3rd 45 “Sha-La-La-La-Lee” in reaching the #3 spot. A full-length followed a few months later.

Sporting the brass to open with “Shake” in Sam Cooke’s tempo, ’66’s Small Faces starts out strong and never really falters, which is impressive for a debut comprised roughly equally, as was the norm of the time, of originals and borrowed/cover material. Neither tentative nor betraying instrumental greenness, the Small Faces were also unburdened by conflict over what they wanted to be.

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The TVD Storefront

Love Ghost,
The TVD First Date and Video Premiere, “24-7”

“I love the anticipation, the “chum, chum” as the turntable spins before the drop of the needle. That countdown before you hear the authenticity of the record is really exciting. With vinyl, you get an experience of being in the room of the actual recording, the analogue sound is so present, so real for me.”

“I have had great experiences at record stores as well. There used to be a store called Penny Lane in Pasadena 2 blocks from the house I grew up in. I used to go there with my Dad and shop for hours (then they moved to Upland—a sad day both my Dad and me).

At the time we did not have a record player at home, so it was mostly CDs back then, but I was always looking at the records. There is another great used record shop in Pasadena called Poo-Bah (the guy who owns it knows so much about music, it is crazy). Just holding an album in your hands is great, I love the feel of it, the weight, the size of the artwork.

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The TVD Record Store Club

Graded on a Curve:
New in Stores, July
2018, Part Two

Part two of the TVD Record Store Club’s look at the new and reissued releases presently in stores for July, 2018. Part one is here.

NEW RELEASE PICKS: Sumrrá, 6 Mulleres (Clermont) Sumrrá is a Spanish jazz trio of the contempo piano (Manuel Gutiérrez Iglesias), bass (Xacobe Martínez Antelo), and drums (L.A.R. Legido) variety, and their approach, while undeniably accessible, consistently avoids the featherweight mainstream tropes that often drag down the form. Gutierrez in particular favors drive over lightness of touch (I’m reminded a bit of LaMont Johnson), and the brightness of the recording really brings Antelo into the thick of things. The freshness of execution is matched with an admirable concept, with the selections paying trib to six inspirational women, namely Frida Kahlo and Rosa Parks from North America, Rosalía De Castro from Galicia, Qui Jin from China, Malala Yousafzai from Pakistan, and Nawal El Saadawi from Egypt. A-

Catherine Sikora and Brian Chase, Untitled: After (Chaikin) A CD of sax-drum improvisations inspired by Seamus Haney’s translation of Beowulf? Hey, count me in! Sikora, known for, amongst other collabs, Clockwork Mercury with bassist Eric Mingus, blows tenor and soprano while Chase, high of profile as the drummer for Yeah Yeah Yeahs, but with numerous experimental credits to his name (see directly below), handles the kit; the duo exchange (to reference the title of another sax-drums LP, the ’73 classic by Rashied Ali and Frank Lowe), is magnificent throughout. I prefer Sikora on tenor, but that’s no commentary on her abilities; regarding soprano, I feel the same about Trane. Speaking of, it you dig Interstellar Space, don’t sleep on this. Track 6 “brightly forged” even brought Meditations to mind. A

REISSUE/ARCHIVAL PICKS: Brian Chase, Drums and Drones: Decade (Chaikin) This 3CD + 144-page book really cements Yeah Yeah Yeahs drummer Chase’s dedication to the avant-garde. It collects Drums and Drones I, which came out in 2013 (with a DVD absent from this collection), II: Ataraxia from ’15, and III: Acoustic from ’17 (the second and last appear to be debuting here). Inspired by the Dream House installation of La Monte Young and Miriam Zazeela and utilizing Just Intonation, the drone bona fides are robust. But while I was cognizant of this connection prior, the results still sounded much different than expected. Striving to reach the meditative, Chase avoids the hackneyed, with the sounds (well-nigh impossible as casual listening) intense and enveloping. An altogether outstanding achievement. A+

Tim Hecker, Haunt Me, Haunt Me Do It Again & Radio Amor (Kranky) The first two full-length releases from Canadian electronic specialist Hecker reissued on double vinyl and CD. Although he’d issued some minimal techno (as Jetone) prior, the 2001 release of Haunt Me on the Alien8 subsidiary Substractif was devoid of beats (well, other than a snippet at the very end, anyway) while blazing a trail ahead of the period’s already forward-thinking glitch crowd (with whom he definitely shared similarities). Debuting for the Mille Plateaux label, ’03’s Radio Amor wasn’t a direct follow-up (notably, there was the “My Love is Rotten To the Core” EP), but today it sounds like the natural successor to his debut. In terms of intellectually-inclined ambient-experimental electronics, these are hard to beat. A/ A-

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A morning mix of news for the vinyl inclined

In rotation: 7/12/18

Pittsburgh, PA | “Vinyl-Man” Jerry Weber to sell 100,000 records for $1: The former owner of Pennsylvania music shop Jerry’s Records, is selling 15,000 LPs, 12″s and 7″s this weekend for $1 each, reports the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. “After selling Jerry’s in 2017, I realised that I still had 250,000 records in my Swissvale warehouse. Most of them untouched since 2003. I would love to find good homes for them by 2019,” Jerry Weber aka “Vinyl-Man” shares. To add to the excitement, on the final day of Dollarpalooza weekend after 1pm all records are free. This isn’t the first time Weber has sold records on the cheap. In 2016, he hosted a massive 3-week clearance of the basement inside Jerry’s Records with 40,000+ basement records available for 50 cents each. According to his website, “when you rescue a record you have formed a Holy Covenant you promise to love and keep it clean, warm, and dry. For this the record will provide you with much musical enjoyment for 20-50-100 years.”

Atlanta, GA | 640 West Community Café presents JB’s Record Lounge: the Vinyl Revival: …Jonathan Blanchard believes that vinyl records are just as relevant to the African American community today as they were back then. His new record store, JB’s Record Lounge, recently opened to the public in historic West End, Atlanta. While this venture may prove to be economically timely, due to a burgeoning demand for vinyl records amongst both young and older demographics, his ambitions are more directly tied to stimulating consciousness in the African American community while using the record store and music as a catalyst for change. According to Blanchard, the store is a “dream born out of necessity” derived from his “love of vintage vinyl” and his experiences as a musician.

Hamilton, OH | Hamilton businesses struggling amid construction: The Main Street Vinyl space has been a lot of things over the years, like a psychic’s office, a barbershop and now a record store. The one thing owner Bill Herren is trying to keep it from being is closed. Herren’s business and others in downtown Hamilton have been affected by changes to make the area safer. Crews are replacing nearly-century-old water mains and the overall landscape of Main Street. With construction expected to last well into the fall, business owners are pleading for customers to brave the barriers and come in. Herren estimated the construction has reduced his business by 35 or 40 percent. “Business was great before,” he said. “Now we’re beginning to hurt a little bit on it, along with everybody else.”

Las Vegas, NV | Houston twins going ‘On the Record’ with new Las Vegas Strip nightclub: The guys delivering On The Record nightclub to Park MGM claim they are so out of the box, “There is no box.”…We have, like, four different clubs in one place. There’s The Living Room, The Record Parlor, and the main room as well as three private rooms.” …Music will carry the night: “This venue is going to be music-centric, and that’s what appealed to us,” Mark Houston says. “The partnership with T-Mobile Arena and The Park Theater, and our entrance being a vintage record shop, are all things that we love and embrace.”

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The TVD Storefront

TVD Radar: Making Vinyl’s 2018 Packaging Awards for Vinyl & CD

VIA PRESS RELEASE | Now accepting entries! Submissions deadline is August 15, 2018.

The Making Vinyl Packaging Awards recognizes the importance and critical role that physical packaging plays in selling music. The larger 12″ x 12″ canvas no doubt is contributing to the vinyl format’s astounding comeback. In the age of MP3, downloads, and digital streaming, recorded music experiences diminish substantially. There’s nothing like a well-designed LP cover or a graphics-rich gatefold for a sensory connection to the sounds emanating from the speakers or headphones.

To be considered for this packaging competition, you must submit electronically through this site. There is a fee for submitting, but sliding scale discounts for multiple entries coming from submitting entities (one entry $50, two to five entries $40 each, six to ten entries $30 each, and 11 or more $20 each). Global entries are welcome. All electronic submissions must be received by Wednesday, August 15, 2018, 11:59 pm (EST). No exceptions.

Finalists will be notified by email and they will have two weeks to send two copies of each submission by Wednesday, August 29, 2018 at 5 pm (EST) to the attention of Lilly Smith c/o AIGA, 233 Broadway, Suite 1740, New York, NY 10279. No exceptions will be allowed. Submissions may come from record labels, pressing plants, brokers, packagers, printers, mastering facilities, artists, and distributors with the caveat that they fit the packaging-focused categories.

For more info, see the Making Vinyl Packaging Awards FAQs or download our Packaging Awards Flyer.

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The TVD Storefront

10 String Symphony,
The TVD First Date
and Album Premiere, Generation Frustration

“I grew up on cassettes and grew into vinyl. We’d listen to classical music in the morning and Neil Young and Paul Simon at night. There were times when I thought of the classical morning hearkening as boot camp. Once I got a taste of the musical ’60s and ’70s, that’s all I wanted, and my impatience showed. But, as a classical violin student, homework came first.”

“My parents had gotten rid of their record player before I was born and replaced it with a Pioneer tape deck and receiver to match. I still remember my Dad saying, “Pioneer is a great brand. Lasts forever.”

I bought my first vinyl record fresh out of college. Neil Young—Hearts & Doves. I figured if I bought the record first, then I’d have to get a player, receiver, the whole bit. I found a vintage player and some speakers at a warehouse in Pittsburgh. The guy who sold it to me, Dan, had a serious range of options. I bought the Pioneer.

I love the physicality of vinyl—taking time with the artwork, digging into who played on which track. But the listening experience is why I think vinyl is standing the test of time. We’re all up in our phones all day, every day. Lots of people listen to music now the way they scroll through Instagram—jumping from track to track, maybe not even finishing a song before they jump to the next one. Even music lovers are guilty of this. Sadly, even me.

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  • SUPPORTING YOUR LOCAL INDIE SHOPS SINCE 2007


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