The Tin Man, The TVD First Date and Premiere, “Don’t Want To Be Free”

“When I think of vinyl I think of Christmas morning. As a kid, the soundtrack to my race downstairs was “Little Drummer Boy” and the Beach Boys’ Christmas album. Something about the pops and crackles of the record player made it feel even warmer than the fire my folks always had going.”

“Growing up, there was always music playing throughout the house. We had one of those intercom systems that was connected to the radio, and you could send music to every room. But despite my mom being an operatic vocalist and my dad coming from the radio business, neither one is the type of person who buys new music on a regular basis. So the music I had access to was a fixed collection from their younger years.

The Beach Boys. Paul Simon. James Brown. Captain & Tennille. Crap tons of Captain & Tennille. For a guy who describes his music as anthemic folk-rock, there was a serious shortage of rock in their record collection. But I fell in love with the story-driven lyrics, catchy melodies, and lush harmonies of these albums. They were my first real influences.

Then came the BMG and Columbia House days. $0.01 got you ten CDs and a future financial commitment that didn’t make my parents too happy. But it introduced me to R.E.M. among other bands, who become my next great love.

As time went on my dad digitized all their albums, hopping on the MP3 train. And I found myself investing my playlist-making skills in Spotify. But a year ago while digging around my parents’ basement, I came across their old United Audio record player, Marantz 2245 amplifier, and Knight speakers. Then after reminding them I was their only child I went back to my loft with all three as well as my own personal greatest hits selections from their stack of records.

I now find myself frequenting the bargain bins of Criminal Records, the best independent record store in Atlanta. My greatest find to date is Bruce Springsteen’s Born in the U.S.A. for $5. Listening to vinyl has become ritualistic for me. It’s soothing in a way that reminds me of being a kid. I can’t wait to hear my debut EP on vinyl when the shipment comes in.

I may even toss one into the bargain bin at Criminal Records when no one’s looking.”
Marshall Seese

“Don’t Want To Be Free” is taken from The Tin Man’s forthcoming EP, “Too Many Lines” which arrives in stores on March 18.

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