Author Archives: Joseph Neff

Graded on a Curve: New
in Stores, February 2018, Part Four

Part four of the TVD Record Store Club’s look at the new and reissued wax presently in stores for February, 2018. Part one is here, part two is here, and part three is here.

NEW RELEASE PICKS: The Skull Defekts, S/T (Thrill Jockey) I’ll admit that I first got into The Skull Defekts due to the connection with Daniel Higgs, who’d been the singer and poetic fount for Baltimore’s Lungfish, a band I long loved, and who’d joined the Swedish band well after their formation. But in soaking up their pre-Higgs discography, the appeal widened, with The Skull Defekts’ work serving up another fine example of Swede u-ground rock (with connections to Anti Cimix, Cortex, Union Carbide Productions, and Kid Commando), and it continues here with Higgs’ departure and Mariam Wallentin stepping in. In a reflective explanatory piece written by member Joachim Nordwall, he observes that this is probably their most composed album, and I don’t disagree. But it’s still a superb finale. A-

Renata Zeiguer, Old Ghost (Northern Spy/Double Denim) Although this is vocalist, pianist, and violinist Zeiguer’s first full-length, she doesn’t lack experience; there was her self-released “Horizons” EP from back in 2013, and she’s spent time in the interim performing as Cantina and contributing to numerous projects, including Ava Luna, Twin Sister, Cassandra Jenkins, and Christopher Burke of Beach Fossils. But it goes back farther than that; influenced as a child by classical music and a little later by the Great American Songbook, there is a florid quality to much of her material that when combined with her vocal strengths, solidifies the mention of Kate Bush. But her love of The Beatles and tropicalia also shines through (adding welcome touches of strangeness0, and I dig the indie rock toughness throughout. A-

REISSUE PICKS: Allen Ginsberg, Howl and Other Poems (Craft) This set includes a bunch of pertinent material: there’s a booklet with writing by Beat expert Ann Charters and poet Anne Waldman, a repro of the invite to the poetry reading of ’56 held at City Lights bookstore, a photo of the man at his typewriter, and a reprint of the City Lights Pocket Poets edition of the work that impacted so many lives and challenged so many norms. It’s all certainly appropriate regarding the poetry’s import and looks cool as hell, but the main attraction is a translucent red vinyl repress of the Fantasy Records LP from ’59. Hearing “Howl” read by its creator still delivers a major charge, stripping away time’s extraneous bullshit and getting to its protest core. Before braying it’s no longer relevant, just take a look around. A+

Langley Schools Music Project, Innocence & Despair (Bar/None) When this collection of ’70s Canadian elementary schoolers doing pop-rock tunes under the aegis of a cool music teacher emerged in back in 2001, it was a bit of a sensation, and deservedly so, as it delivered an extended dose of youthful goodness that seems impossible to resist; over the years I’ve witnessed it unrankle more than a few curmudgeons, and if you need a taste of human decency to offset the drag-me-downs of existence, it’s a surefire remedy. Putting the kibosh on any twee tendencies and resonating emotionally in a way that music created for children almost always doesn’t, to swipe from Tosches, it’s really the school assembly that transcendeth all knowing. And “The Long and Winding Road” gets me every time. A

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Graded on a Curve:
Mark Renner,
Few Traces

Mark Renner’s name may not ring a multitude of bells, but for those hungering for unearthed ’80s sounds, RVNG Intl.’s release of Few Traces might just change that; influenced by John Foxx-era Ultravox, Yellow Magic Orchestra, Bill Nelson, The Skids, The Associates, and Van Morrison’s mid-’80s period, Baltimorean Renner fully embraced the smart pop possibilities of the era. The maturity should stoke fans of the above names, as well as David Sylvian, Cocteau Twins, and even Felt, as the impact of the written word (from Herman Hesse to William Butler Yeats to John Greanleaf Whittier) helps the whole in standing out. Available now on compact disc and digital, the double vinyl arrives February 23.

Although Mark Renner’s entry into musicmaking began by answering an ad to join a band (the enticing factor in his case was the mention of big fave Ultravox), the music collected on Few Traces was recorded later and largely solo, with the artist utilizing a four-track recorder, voice, electric guitar, and a Casio CZ101 synthesizer.

Renner debuted in 1986 with the self-released All Walks of this Life. Most of that album is included here, and along with early singles, compilation tracks, and unreleased material, there appears to be one cut from his full-length follow-up Painter’s Joy, which came out on ’88 through the partnership of the labels Dimension and Restless. Decades later, RVNG Intl.’s Matt Werth picked up a copy of Renner’s debut at a Philadelphia flea market, and the seed of Few Traces was planted.

This is not to suggest that Renner hung it up creatively after Painter’s Joy. While he’s been more active recently as a painter and printmaker, there are a handful of releases available digitally via Bandcamp. I’ve not heard those, but the consistent high quality of Few Traces does instill interest in checking them out, and Maia Stern’s upcoming documentary on Renner, as well.

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Graded on a Curve: YoshimiO / Susie Ibarra
/ Robert Aiki Aubrey Lowe, Flower of Sulphur

If you’ve a hankering for unadulterated improvisation, the new record featuring the talents of multi-instrumentalist YoshimiO, avant drum titan Susie Ibarra, and multidisciplinary artist Robert Aiki Aubrey Lowe will likely sate that need, if only for a little while. Documenting the meeting of the three in performance in front of an audience at Brooklyn’s Roulette, Flower of Sulphur isn’t likely to convert those agnostic to improv’s qualities, but for ears just growing accustomed to abstract ambiance, it could prove inviting and ultimately satisfying as it reaches a bit beyond the style’s norms. It’s out February 23 on double opaque lavender vinyl and compact disc through Thrill Jockey of Chicago.

As a fan from back in the days of Boredoms, I’m eager to soak up any project with YoshimiO’s name on it, mainly because she’s yet to disappoint. Amongst other activities, there was U.F.O. or Die with Boredoms cohort Yamataka Eye; the indie supergroup Free Kitten, which teamed her with Sonic Youth’s Kim Gordon, Pussy Galore’s Julia Cafritz and later, Pavement’s Mark Ibold; and the ample discography her own group OOIOO. Last year, she debuted SAICOBAB, a quartet combining ancient Indian traditional music with contempo methods and sounds.

Unsurprising for an artist frequently identified as belonging to the jazz realm, Susie Ibarra’s appearances on record are considerable, though her discography is nowhere near as daunting as some of her peers. She’s played with David S. Ware, John Zorn, Wadada Leo Smith, Sylvie Courvoisier, William Parker, Dave Douglas, Eugene Chadbourne, Mark Dresser, Marc Ribot, and Matthew Shipp, in duo with Denis Charles, Assif Tsahar, and Derek Bailey, and to move outside the jazz/ improv zone, Yo La Tengo. Having witnessed her at the kit behind Prefuse 73, I can attest that she can kill it in a variety of contexts.

Robert Aiki Aubrey Lowe first emerged through the post-HC band 90 Day Men, then lit out on his own as Lichens and eventually under an expanded moniker (initially, he went by just Robert Lowe). Like Ibarra and YoshimiO, his collaborations have been wide-ranging, including The Cairo Gang, Om, and Rhys Chatham, plus co-credited releases with artist Rose Lazar (’08’s “Gyromancy” and ’10’s Eclipses, both for Thrill Jockey) and the early electronic-proto New Ager Ariel Kalma (’15’s very cool We Know Each Other Somehow, for RVNG).

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Graded on a Curve: New
in Stores, February 2018, Part Three

Part three of the TVD Record Store Club’s look at the new and reissued wax presently in stores for February, 2018. Part one is here and part two is here.

NEW RELEASE PICKS: Astrid Sonne, Human Lines (Escho) Based in Copenhagen, Sonne has a classical background and a budding interest in electronic composition. This is her debut, and its quality is in some way explained by her experience in creating site-specific compositions for installations. Human Lines has been described as an attempt to balance mechanical and organic musical elements, and I’d say she’s pulled it off without a hitch. Well-tagged as abstract, Sonne’s work has range; a few spots, like the beginning of “Real,” register as highly caffeinated versions of the stuff heard on early avant-garde electronic albums, though most of the duration is tied to more recent techno developments. A striking exception is closer “Alta,” which is a string piece hovering between drone and modernist classical. A-

Grand Veymont, Route du vertige (Objet Disque) Grand Veymont is the French duo of Béatrice Morel Journel and Josselin Varengo, who after playing separately in a bunch of other outfits decided to team up in formation of a concept they call “salon de Krautrock.” More specifically, on their second release (after a 2016 EP) they offer four long to longer tracks that should hit lovers of Broadcast and Stereolab right in the sweet spot. It should especially tickle those who dug it when Stereolab really stretched out. However, Route du vertige isn’t so easily summarized, as the final track’s 14 minutes begin with a Brit-folky flute fest. Once the drugs kick in, they head into a Doors-like zone, though it’s reflected through the lens of the Paisley Underground, and with lots of French femme vocals. I love it. A-

REISSUE PICKS: Laughing Hyenas, Merry Go Round & You Can’t Pray a Lie (Third Man) It’s useful to keep in mind that the ’80s US rock underground was more than the acts featured in Our Band Could Be Your Life. Much more. Like many of the subjects in Michael Azerrad’s book, Ann Arbor, MI’s Laughing Hyenas’ roots are in hardcore; raw throat behemoth John Brannon was the voice of Negative Approach, while guitarist Larissa Strickland played in L-Seven (not L7), a post-punk unit that hovered on the fringes of the Midwest HC scene. Third Man will be reissuing the Hyenas entire output on LP, beginning here with the ’95 expansion of their ’87 EP and it’s ’89 follow-up. The sound is industrial strength punk blues, owing much to The Stooges and especially The Birthday Party. Recorded by Butch Vig, it still slays. B+/ A-

Sun Kil Moon, Ghosts of the Great Highway (Rough Trade) The first album by Mark Kozelek’s band post Red House Painters, released by Jetset in 2003, though the original limited 2LP, the sequencing of which Rough Trade’s set duplicates, was issued simultaneously by Cameron Crowe’s Vinyl Films. In ’07 Kozelek put out a 2CD on his Caldo Verde label, but this repress (designated as “one time only”) should please fans who want the wax but can’t or won’t drop hundreds of bones for an original. Musically, it’s a fine listen, essentially picking up where the Painters left off (RHP drummer Anthony Koutsos is in the lineup), and with a strong batch of songs (all by Kozelek) with a partial focus on pugilists; one of those, the extended “Duk Koo Kim” (spreading across side three) spotlights the band and is a standout. A-

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Graded on a Curve:
This Kind of Punishment,
This Kind of Punishment,
A Beard of Bees

New Zealander Graeme Jefferies is noted for his work in the often terrific Cakekitchen, and his brother Peter has been rightfully praised for a handful of solo LPs, but in the early ’80s they were the main pillars in one of the finest if too seldom heard Kiwi outfits, the startlingly original This Kind of Punishment. To describe their self-titled 1983 debut and its ’84 follow-up A Beard of Bees as post-punk isn’t wrong, but it does feel more than a little reductive, and in the global underground of that era both albums’ contents rank high. And additionally, right now; fitfully available in the decades since initial release, they’ve just received their first-time vinyl reissue by Superior Viaduct.

I remain fond of classifying The Clean, The Chills, The Verlaines, and Tall Dwarfs as Flying Nun’s Big Four; this is in part due to persevering reputations, but it’s also because in the late ’80s, due to a licensing agreement between that crucial New Zealand label and Homestead Records, those acts were the easiest to hear in the US. And for a while, it wasn’t easy to hear much else, which only intensified the notion of the Flying Nun “sound” as melodic, catchy and guitar-based (with Tall Dwarfs only somewhat excepted, as that two-man unit, if psych-tinged and proto-lo-fi, also wielded a sharp pop sensibility).

However, time has reinforced that Flying Nun’s stylistic reach was much wider than many youthful Yanks once assumed. There was the moody post-punk of Pin Group, whose “Ambivalence” 45 was the label’s first release; there was the loud and heavy Gordons, who slowly morphed into Bailter Space; there was the artier pop-punk of Bill Direen and his group the Builders, whose Beatin Hearts was Flying Nun’s first LP; and of course, there was This Kind of Punishment.

Before Graeme and Peter emerged with TKP in 1983, they were part of Nocturnal Projections, a band formed in 1981 in the North Island municipality of Stratford. Today, their 7-inch and two 12-inch EPs go for major scratch, and even the out-of-print Nerve Ends in Power Lines comp CD from ’95 is rather pricey. This is a shame since the Joy Division-ish post-punk found in their grooves illuminates how the brothers Jefferies didn’t just conjure the excellence of TKP out of thin air.

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Graded on a Curve: Digable Planets,
Reachin’ (A New Refutation of Time
and Space)

Those who enjoy Shabazz Palaces might be familiar with Ishmael Butler’s prior role in Digable Planets, but if this knowledge only extends to rep, the opportunity to investigate further via turntable just got a whole lot easier. On February 23 Light in the Attic’s Modern Classics division is giving the group’s debut Reachin’ (A New Refutation of Time and Space) its first vinyl reissue, expanding it to 2LP for a better sonic experience, and including insightful liners by Larry Mizell Jr. Also, again for the first time, the booklet sports the lyrics of “Butterfly” Butler, Craig “Doodlebug” Irving, and Mary-Ann “Ladybug Mecca” Vieira. Buying online gets you blue and lavender blended wax; in retail stores the vinyl will be gold.

Any survey of 1993’s pop landscape that’s really worth a damn will provide space for Digable Planets’ “Rebirth of Slick (Cool Like Dat).” It was the first single from the group’s debut record, and their biggest hit by a considerable margin, topping Billboard’s Rap Chart, peaking at No. 15 on the hot 100, and eventually winning the ’94 Grammy for Best Rap Performance by a Duo or Group; this is all triply impressive, as not only does the song not suck, but it helped to refine a fresh direction in hip-hop.

Although De La Soul and especially A Tribe Called Quest helped lay the groundwork, there’s no doubt that Digable Planets were introducing something different to the mid-’90s, and for many, particularly those who felt the form was at its best as an uncompromising, parent frightening thing, they could be a hard pill to swallow. Yes, a couple of years earlier, Tribe’s The Low End Theory firmly established impeccable smoothness as a hip-hop option, but “Rebirth of Slick (Cool Like Dat)” and Reachin’ made the maneuver even more palatable to the pop audience.

But not watered down, though some stubborn holdouts wouldn’t acknowledge this until (or even long after) the release of their second and final album Blowout Comb in the fall of ’94. I stand somewhat guilty of such thinking; while not smitten with Digable Planets at the time (though I certainly didn’t hate or even dismiss ‘em), listening retrospectively (essentially due to interest in Shabazz Palaces) corrected this stance, making me wish I’d initially approached Reachin’ with truly open ears.

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Graded on a Curve: New
in Stores, February 2018, Part Two

Part two of the TVD Record Store Club’s look at the new and reissued wax presently in stores for February, 2018. Part one is here.

NEW RELEASE PICKS: Brigid Mae Power, The Two Worlds (Tompkins Square) Power’s self-titled 2016 LP, also for Tompkins Square, benefited from the confluence of a raised profile and a considerable artistic leap forward. Listening to it then, it fleetingly reminded me of Tim Buckley, Cat Power, Joanna Newsom, Nico and more. She cut that disc in Portland, Oregon with Peter Broderick; this one was recorded, again with Broderick, in Galway, Ireland, the city in which she mostly grew up. Power describes it as far from a rosy move, but the “repressive and oppressive environment” was conducive to her finishing “Don’t Shut Me Up Politely,” which is amongst the highpoints on this psych-folk beauty. Another standout is the exquisitely outsider-edgy “Down on the Ground.” An altogether superb release. A

Jerry David DeCicca, Time the Teacher (Impossible Ark) DeCicca is probably still best-known for fronting Black Swans; this LP might change that. Hopefully, it doesn’t get lost in the current bustle. Per Time the Teacher’s notes, these songs were written after a move to Texas with cats and a loved one, but DeCicca didn’t want it to sound typically Texan, and in consort with producers Jeb Loy Nichols and Benedic Lambin, he’s succeeded. While the root is singer-songwriter of a ’70s sort, the decision to backseat guitar for piano, horns, and soulful vocal backing brings a deep breath of fresh air that resists easy comparisons. However, “Kiss a Love Goodbye” is a bit like Randy Newman in confessional mode with a mid-song dose of reeds reminiscent of Lambchop circa How I Quit Smoking. A-

REISSUE PICKS: Shudder to Think, Ten Spot (Dischord) & Pony Express Record (B-Core Disc) Over the years I’ve noticed folks occasionally downgrading Ten Spot, but upon reflection and a few fresh spins I can’t get with those assessments at all. I heavily dug Shudder’s art-glam-post-harDCore merger from the point of their debut (and especially the anthemic wail of “Let it Ring”), but Ten Spot got lots of play in the first car I ever owned with a tape deck, and a few decades later it hasn’t slipped in my estimation a bit. Of course, by Pony Express Record, with a retooled lineup and a move to Epic Records (a final Dischord 45 gave a taste of what was in store), they were a machine to be reckoned with. Of the ’90s indie-to-major label records that hardly anybody bought, it remains among the very best. A-/ A

Chet Baker, Sings (Wax Love) All of the ’50s Baker vocal albums have their charms, and unless you simply can’t abide jazz singing or just dislike Chet (hey, some people do), you’ll do good getting this one. Record three for Riverside, Chet Baker Sings It Could Happen to You, has the best band (Kenny Drew, Sam Jones, Philly Joe), but this set, the first of two for Pacific Jazz, has the appeal of being, well, first. But in fact, that’s side two of this LP, recorded in ’54 and originally released on 10-inch. Side one was cut two years later, after the material that comprises Chet Baker Sings and Plays…Got it? Folks have argued that without his matinee idol looks and the tone of his skin these opportunities wouldn’t have come to Baker, and I don’t disagree at all. But it’s not like he couldn’t sing. And his sound remains unique. A-

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Graded on a Curve:
Greg Ruby & the
Rhythm Runners,
Syncopated Classic

On Syncopated Classic, Seattle-based guitarist-composer Greg Ruby and his collaborators the Rhythm Runners uncover a fascinating, nearly forgotten chapter in early jazz history. Specifically, they play the lost work of 1920’s Seattle jazz musician Frank D. Waldron. But Ruby’s also coordinated a complete reprint of Waldron’s self-published music book of 1924; it includes lead sheets to the jazz pioneer’s original compositions, an enlightening biographical essay by Ruby and Paul de Barros, relevant photos, and even an additional download of the music in its original instrumentation. Both the book and the Rhythm Runners vinyl/CD is available now through gregrubymusic.com.

The scholarly approach: regularly wielded as a putdown or to deliver measured praise (I stand guilty as charged), the term also comes with its own anti-intellectual baggage, and is frequently employed by those who strive to blissfully absorb art while knowing next to nothing about it. Sure, the scholarly approach can sometimes be dry or weighed-down with interpretation (thanks, Susan), but it’s often the most effective way to delve into a subject; in the case of Frank D. Waldron, it’s the only way. As said, Waldron was a near forgotten figure in jazz’s development, a circumstance certainly exacerbated by the fact that he never recorded, and furthermore, Syncopated Classic, his instructional book of nine songs for saxophone and piano, can be assessed as essentially lost; Greg Ruby’s introduction to it came through a tattered photocopy.

He didn’t stumble upon it by accident. Ruby (who in the interest of full disclosure is married to an old friend of mine, though we’ve only met once) is a specialist in hot jazz and related styles, leading his own Quartet alongside playing with the Rhythm Runners and the Bric-a-brac Trio, as well as working as a music instructor. In addition to this expanded reprint of Syncopated Classic, he’s also published the Pearl Django Play-Along Book Vol. 1, which focuses on gypsy jazz; the release of a play-along CD/book devoted to the music of the Argentine swing-era guitarist Oscar Alemán is imminent.

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Graded on a Curve:
Nina Simone,
Mood Indigo: The Complete Bethlehem Singles

To say Nina Simone needs no introduction surely feels right as far as clichés go, but it ignores that thousands of music fans are currently unfamiliar with her work. And that’s thousands too many. On February 9, those looking to dive into her vast discography are presented with a marvelous opportunity, as BMG is offering Mood Indigo: The Complete Bethlehem Singles on compact disc and on vinyl with a bonus 7-inch. Over the decades much of its contents have been fitfully available, but in oft-shoddy editions and with little or no context for the novice. With warm sound and informative notes by Ashley Khan, the set amplifies Simone’s brilliance from the beginning. Its release is reason to celebrate.

My introduction to Nina Simone came through her 1961 Colpix 45 “You Can Have Him” b/w “Gin House Blues,” which was tucked into a jukebox housed in a tea room in my hometown. Ruth’s Tea Room it was called, but the proprietor was named Vivian. It was just her and a canine companion, a friendly boxer named Zeus. On weekends, high school friends and I would often end up there to do exactly what you’d expect; converse and drink tea, though she also made a splendid orangeade. And on every visit, someone would get up to play that jukebox.

Occasionally, Nina’s A-side would get picked, but it was really “Gin House Blues” that we loved. And you might assume that hearing that record sent me on an immediate search to hear more of Simone’s work, but no; at that moment, in that context, curiosity and an unquenchable musical appetite was quelled by the comfort of ritual. Right then, those two songs were enough.

Naturally, I eventually took the plunge, and it was frustrating that Simone’s pre-RCA stuff wasn’t easy to find. It’s true that Little Girl Blue, her debut album for Bethlehem, which features most of the songs on Mood Indigo, has a long reissue history, but most of the action seems to have occurred in Europe and Japan. In the ’90s there was a slew of Bethlehem jazz reissues in the bargain bins, but Nina’s album never turned up. But over time and a handful of compilations, it was possible to piece together nearly all of Simone’s sole session for the label.

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Graded on a Curve: New
in Stores, February 2018, Part One

Part one of the TVD Record Store Club’s look at the new and reissued wax presently in stores for February, 2018.

NEW RELEASE PICKS: Kevin Sun, Trio (Endectomorph Music) If you’re into pianoless trios with a horn up front, you’ll not want to miss this one. Sun has recorded previously in the collective quartets Great On Paper and Earprint, but this is his first release under his own name, spotlighting him on tenor, c-melody sax, and clarinet with Walter Stinson on bass and Matt Honor on drums. As I listened, the promo text’s mentions of Warne Marsh and Lee Konitz rang true, and the way the band engages with tradition while eschewing the straight ahead brought Steve Lacy to mind. Much of these 71-minutes can be described as cerebral, even the reading of “All Of Me,” but occasionally they step fully outside, as on “One Never Knows Now,” which reminded me of ’70s Braxton teamed up with Milford Graves and Alan Silva. A

Ezra Feinberg, Pentimento and others (Related States) Guitarist Feinberg was the leader of San Francisco psychsters Citay. After folding that band in 2012, he moved to Brooklyn and shifted focus to marriage, family, and work as a psychanalyst. Less positively, he lost a friend and early artistic mentor to cancer. But the pull of musicmaking is a strong one. Rather than attempt to pick up where he left off (impossible), Feinberg embraced growth and changes, and the results are splendid. Psychedelia is still an ingredient, but the instrumental net Pentimento casts is wide, including recurring strains of ambient-drone-New Age, NYC Minimalist repetition, a whole lot of fingerpicking, and on finale “Experience Near,” the pedal steel of guest Pete Grant. An altogether fine reentry to the scene. A-

REISSUE PICKS: Shuggie Otis, Inspiration Information (8th) When this was reissued back in 2001, it was a revelation. Originally released by Epic in ’74, Otis’ fourth album was severely overlooked and then promptly all but forgotten; subsequently, used copies were scarce, at least around my digs, and while I knew Shuggie through his dad’s band, Kooper Session and Zappa’s Hot Rats, I was frankly unprepared for what emerged through the auspices of David Byrne’s Luaka Bop label. “Holy smokes, this thing is magnificent!” I recall gushing at the time. Since then, having listened more and gathered perspective, I’ve reined in the enthusiasm, but only a little, as this blend of psychedelic soul, Curtis, Marvin, and Otis’ own thing remains a brilliant achievement, and one still accurately tagged as magnificent. A

Country Joe and the Fish, Electric Music for the Mind and Body & I Feel Like I’m Fixin’ To Die (Craft) These two slabs are part of Craft’s 4LP stereo-and-mono-mix collector set Wave of Electrical Sound, which comes with an assortment of bells and whistles and an unseen by me 30-minute doc on DVD. But the stereo versions are available separately, so we’ll approach them that way. Electric Music is an essential serving of original San Francisco psychedelia, and one that gets not nearly enough contemporary love. Yes, it’s dated, but in the best way possible; cut for indie Vanguard, the contents are undiluted stuff. By Fixin’ To Die, which opens with the “clean,” jug-bandy version of their best-known tune, they’d begun to slip, but the whole is better than some detractors, who probably hate hippies, claim. A/ A-

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  • SUPPORTING YOUR LOCAL INDIE SHOPS SINCE 2007


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