Author Archives: Joseph Neff

Graded on a Curve:
New in Stores, April
2018, Part Five

Part five of the TVD Record Store Club’s look at the new and reissued releases presently in stores for April, 2018. Part one is here, part two is here, part three is here, and part four is here.

NEW RELEASE PICKS: Oliver Coates, John Luther Adam’s Canticles of the Sky (RVNG Intl.) This arrangement of Adams’ 2007 composition differs from cellist-composer-producer Coates’ UK premiere of the piece from March of ’17; on stage there were 32 cellists, but for this recording it’s just himself. As a multi-layered studio approach is utilized, I’ll speculate that the performance and this limited-edition album (which came out in conjunction with Record Store Day; per the label it will not be repressed) are comparable in effect, though the use of “extra-musical studio techniques” also situates this LP as a distinct experience. Even as Coates cites the influence of early electronic innovator Laurie Spiegel, the depth of emotion here fits snuggly into a modern classical context. Short, but wholly satisfying. A

Scott Matthews, The Great Untold (Shedio) Wolverhampton, England’s Matthews debuted with Passing Stranger back in ’06, winning an Ivor Novello Award (Best Song Musically & Lyrically) for that album’s “Ellusive.” His output since has drawn occasional comparisons to Jeff Buckley, though on the opening title track of this fine LP (his sixth studio effort overall) I’m reminded just as much of Nick Drake (the comparison makes sense, as Matthews performed as part of Joe Boyd’s stage production Way to Blue-The Songs of Nick Drake). Having completed his Home duology, The Great Untold is accurately described as a fresh start, with a scaled-back approach at play, gentle but intense in solo mode with judiciously employed added instrumentation. “Cinnamon” and “As the Day Passes” are the standouts. A-

REISSUE/ARCHIVAL PICKS: Robert Storey, Come Up and Hear My Etchings 1986 – 2016 (Emotional Response) Storey is one of the numerous undersung figures who populated the ’70s-’80s UK DIY scene. He was also intensely prolific. Dubbed as the “dark heart of the Murphy Foundation in all its guises,” the list of projects marked by his involvement is long, and this LP (hopefully the first in a series) collects an enlightening and pleasurable sampling. Where a fair amount of DIY hung way out in the left-field post-punk bleachers, much of what’s collected here places Storey firmly in a sorta freewheeling avant-pop context. Additionally, he’s a productive collaborator, and importantly, unlike many of his DIY cohorts, the man kept trucking right into the 21st century, which is where some of this set’s best stuff derives. A-

Belong, October Language (Spectrum Spools) Turk Dietrich and Mike Jones formed Belong in the Crescent City USA in the early ’00s, their sound drawing upon Eno’s ambient thing and the corroded sensibility of William Basinski (Tim Hecker and Gas have also been listed as touchstones). As mentioned by Spectrum Spools (the sister label of electro-experimental heavy-hitter Editions Mego), their debut has chalked up comparisons to My Bloody Valentine’s Loveless, but minus the song structure; that should be a good indicator of one’s interest. These ears find the edgy drift quite stimulating. October Language first came out in ’06 on CD; there was a vinyl run of 500 pressed in ’09, but folks who missed that boat can grab this edition, which comes with bonus digital tracks from their ’06 tour EP. A-

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Graded on a Curve: BOYTOY,
Night Leaf

Brooklyn’s BOYTOY consists of guitarist-vocalists Saara Untracht-Oakner and Glenn Michael Van Dyke, drummer Chase Noelle (who replaced Matthew Gregory Aidala), and bassist Lena Simon. Of records, they have a few, but their Kyle Mullarky-produced new one Night Leaf registers as their strongest effort yet. Prior, one could discern elements drawn from the ’60s to the ’90s, and as they integrated those influences well, this was just dandy. The multi-decade breadth hasn’t disappeared, but the music’s developed a timeless quality, which is perhaps just another way of saying they’re hitting their stride. The vinyl, 300 on black, 200 on pink, is out April 27 through PaperCup Music. Burger Records has the tape.

Initially a dual guitar-vox-drums trio, BOYTOY made their recording debut in 2014 with a 7-song self-titled 12-inch that was equal parts punky, poppy, distorted, and vibrant. Wielding intertwining guitar dynamics, harmony and thump, the three points of the triangle were adept while collectively eschewing the flashy. Weighty without tilting over into downright heaviness, the sweetness in their attack also never registered as cutesy.

A few months later they issued “Visits” as half of a 45 shared with the electronic duo Pleasure Curses. This made for an unusual combination, as BOYTOY deepened a similarity to the melodically raw side of the indie rock ‘90s. The resemblance persisted on 2015 full-length Grackle, their first for PaperCup, as Aidala delivered vocals in a few spots and the confidence and songwriting chops strengthened.

2016 was quiet on the recording front, but last year brought the “Putty” 7-inch on the Little Dickman label, which is where Noelle (ex-Thelma and The Sleaze) comes in. It’s also where their sound undergoes a tangible uptick. Previously, they could sometimes strike the ear as an improved variation upon the essence of Veruca Salt that could additionally bring the occasional smile to the mugs of Muffs fans, but on A-side “Want” they offered a gem of slightly druggy pop guitar-vocal layering.

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Graded on a Curve:
Marc Ribot’s Ceramic Dog, YRU Still Here?

It’s should (hopefully) be no secret that the politics and social climate of the USA has undergone a troubling turn. Thankfully, large segments of the population have been in no mood to keep their mouths shut about it, and by extension, no shortage of artistically gifted folks have created work speaking to the tenor of the times. Add to the list guitarist Marc Ribot, bassist Shahzad Ismaily, and drummer Ches Smith, together known as Ceramic Dog. Genre eclecticism has always been a major ingredient in the band’s recipe, but the sense of irritation expressed on their third album YRU Still Here? reinforces their effectiveness as a power trio. The record’s out on LP, CD, and digital April 27 through Northern Spy.

After the 2016 Presidential election, there was an idea floated that “punk rock was going to be so good now” (and no need to pinpoint who said it, as it was said by more than one person). This prediction was frankly rather annoying, as it presented a “look on the bright side” scenario to individuals that, no matter how sympathetic to progressive politics they happened to be, were ultimately buffered from the harsh realities of the way shit was going to unravel.

Don’t look on the fucking sunny side; instead, get angry. It means a hell of a lot more than merely consuming someone else’s rage. And yet a problem with expressing anger in our heightened environment of social connectivity is an oft-fatiguing echo chamber of ranting, yelling, and disgust. That’s when the individual perspective and spark of societal engagement, in combination with sharpened creativity, can usefully serve as a tonic in the continuation of the good fight.

It helps when the artist’s political awareness is more than a couple of years old. That’s the case with Marc Ribot, though many would primarily describe him as a versatile extender of the avant-garde. Make that extremely versatile, as he’s as comfortable expressing his punkish side (in a manner comparable to his frequent associate John Zorn) as he is exploring jazz’s multiple angles (both inside and outside) and building upon an extensive résumé as a collaborator and session player.

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Graded on a Curve:
New in Stores, April
2018, Part Four

Part four of the TVD Record Store Club’s look at the new and reissued releases presently in stores for April, 2018. Part one is here, part two is here, and part three is here.

NEW RELEASE PICKS: V/A, ACLU Benefit Compilation (Wharf Cat) As the annual RSD blitz nears, it’s important to keep things in context. That limited color vinyl 45 is cool, but the time in which we are living is, in numerous ways, quite uncool. Vital in the fight against fascism, racism, sexism, etc. has been the American Civil Liberties Union, and this 2LP is designed to aid them in continuing their heroic efforts. Featuring 22 tracks from a lineup including The Men, Alice Cohen, Palberta, Pop 1280, Merchandise, Profligate, and an outstanding piece for solo sax by Kate Mohanty (fittingly titled “Priorities”), the gist is contempo underground focused but with plenty of variety to be had. If you’re at all inclined to the scene, please make some idealistic young lawyers happy for the future of the planet. A-

Lloyd Green & Jay Dee Maness, Journey to the Beginning: A Steel Guitar Tribute to the Byrds (Coastal Bend Music) Folks who are understandably bonkers for Sweetheart of the Rodeo will likely know that Green and Maness contributed pedal steel to that album, the former an established Nashville scene guy and the latter a younger but studio-seasoned cat from L.A. For the album’s 50th birthday, the pair have gotten together to cut an instrumental tribute, and it’s a beauty. Rhythm, mandolin, and occasional fiddle adds richness in support, but it’s always Green and Maness’ show, and they hold the spotlight with grace and an obvious affection for the project. For the close, Jim Lauderdale, Herb Pedersen, Richie Furay, and Jeff Hanna deliver a swell vocal version of “You Ain’t Going Nowhere.” A-

REISSUE/ARCHIVAL PICKS: The Mekons, “Never Been in a Riot” & “Where Were You?” (Superior Viaduct) I’ve observed before that if, at this late date, you really want to find a punk record that matches the frequently lofted genre descriptors of “barely competent” or “attitude over technique,” then head straight for the 3-song ’78 debut by The Mekons, a disc that seems constantly on the verge of falling apart, at least until they arrive at the urban tribal chant of “Heart and Soul.” But it’s not an accident, it’s a conscious approach, and that’s part of what’s so thrilling. Now, if you want to hear growth from this foundation that doesn’t result in or even predict a betrayal of principles, and adds a violin for good measure, then that’s “Where Were You?” Two of the best punk-era singles ever waxed. A/ A

Willie Colón, Wanted by the FBI for the Big Break – La Gran Fuga (Get on Down) Colón’s reputation as one of the greats in the field of salsa is fully deserved. On this ’70 album, the trombonist-bandleader’s sixth for Fania (the label’s name a mark of quality), and with the crucial input of singer Héctor Lavoe, Colón does much to advance the style beyond its root as a dance-party music. Primarily through changes of tempo and tone, but also in the employment of space, this broadening is perceptible even to a casual salsa listener such as myself. Along with dual ‘bones in the lineup and Lavoe leading the vocal charge, rhythm is still king, but the bongos, congas, and timbales are handled with flair that transcends the maintenance of groove. The personal standout element is the piano of “Professor Joe” Torres. A

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Graded on a Curve:
New in Stores, April
2018, Part Three

Part three of the TVD Record Store Club’s look at the new and reissued releases presently in stores for April, 2018. Part one is here and part two is here.

NEW RELEASE PICKS: Linda Perhacs, I’m a Harmony (Omnivore) I stupidly flaked on getting the word out on Perhacs’ newest recording when it dropped last fall, but here’s the Record Store Day 2LP edition to give me another chance. Although her debut Parallelograms came out in 1970, it took decades for folks to tune in to her frequency, with Perhacs eventually benefiting from the interest of freak folkies. However, her work lacked predictable unity with these New Weird Americans, and her two “comeback” albums have widened the distance; here, standout cut “The Dancer” is evocative of Kate Bush, and elsewhere she (and a loaded roster of guests including Julia Holter, Nels Cline, Devendra Banhart, and Durga McBroom) radiate similarities to folktronica, samba pop, psychedelia and more. A-

Anywhere, II (ORG Music) The first album by this project of Christian Eric Beaulieu (ex-Triclops!) was a star-studded affair (released for Record Store Day 2012) that exuded a heavy raga-rock vibe (self-described as eastern acoustic punk) with comparisons made to the work of Sandy Bull and Jack Rose, but with a harder edge. This one’s even more packed with notable contributors (including Krist Novoselic, Dale Crover, Phil Manley, and for a return engagement Cedric Bixler Zavala) enough so that bassist Mike Watt, heard extensively on the first record, is limited here to one track. II maintains the raga tendencies, but rather than affirm the hipper namedrops above, if I may be so gauche, I’ll observe that parts of this even rockier effort are somewhat Zeppelin-like. This is intended as a compliment. A-

REISSUE/ARCHIVAL PICKS: Wire, Nine Sevens (pinkflag) Kicking off a slate of early Wire reissues for 2018 is this dandy singles set, which rounds up six 45s for the Harvest label (including the killer and I suspect underheard non-album singles “Dot Dash” b/w “Options R” and “A Question of Degree” b/w “Former Airline”), the “Our Swimmer” b/w “Midnight Bahnhof Café” disc for Rough Trade, the 4-song EP tucked into the initial pressing of 154, and the tracks found on side two of the “Crazy About Love” 12-inch EP transferred to 7-inch. A few cool twists do emerge, like Pink Flag cut “Ex Lion Tamer” providing the flip to Chairs Missing’s “I Am the Fly,” but overall, this effectively relates in abbreviated form the magnificent essence of this crucial band’s ’77-’80 run. Experience it any way you can A+

Duck Baker, Les Blues Du Richmond : Demos & Outtakes 1973-1979 (Tompkins Square) Guitarist Duck Baker is a treasure. My introduction to his work came through his ’96 CD Spinning Song, where he played the music of the great jazz pianist-composer Herbie Nichols; digging around hence in his sizable discography has never disappointed. His first album came out on Stefan Grossman’s Kicking Mule label in ’75, but before that he cut a demo which takes up the first side of this LP. Blending deft fingerpicking with a couple of 1920s vocal numbers and an interest in free jazz, Baker’s wide influences cohere into a highly individual and accessible experience even at this early stage, and side two’s stuff from ’77-’80 captures his sharpened, broadened, and deepened playing. Guitar fans, don’t dally. A

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Graded on a Curve:
Ganser,
Odd Talk

Amongst the steady flow of contemporary post-punk, Chicago’s Ganser register a few cuts above the average. As evidenced on their new full-length, they offer coherent yet multidimensional muscularity that’s rooted in but not beholden to the tradition informing their work. The playing is dynamic, the shared vocals are complimentary and engaging, and the whole thing seems likely to go down a storm from the bandstand. Odd Talk is out April 20 on milky clear or black vinyl, cassette, and digital through No Trend Records.

Ganser is Alicia Gaines on bass and vocals, Nadia Garofalo on keyboards and vocals, Charlie Landsman on guitar, and Brian Cundiff on drums. Unlike numerous outfits who jampack their bios with loads of portraiture (and hey, there’s nothing wrong with that), Ganser seems to prefer letting their music do the talking, a tendency that jives interestingly with the disc’s stated theme of “communication breakdown.”

The band aren’t mysterious, however; along with clarity over who plays which instrument, it’s not exactly a secret that Ganser came together in 2014 and the following year announced their presence with a sturdy digital single. In 2016 the 3-song “Audrey” cassette EP maintained the quality as it underscored post-punk toughness that’s rightly considered goth-edged but without leaving the lingering impression of being covered in cobwebs or half-whacked on belladonna.

A second digital single emerged shortly thereafter, its A-side “Pyrrhic Victory” continuing down the dark post-punk avenue as the flip “Sunk” dove into noisier territory that, largely through beaucoup guitar racket, affirmed the positive influence of No Wave and Sonic Youth; thus far, it stands as the gem of their discography.

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Graded on a Curve:
New in Stores, April
2018, Part Two

Part two of the TVD Record Store Club’s look at the new and reissued releases presently in stores for April, 2018. Part one is here.

NEW RELEASE PICKS: Bush Tetras, “Take the Fall” (Wharf Cat) Formed when Pat Place exited James Chance & the Contortions and teamed up with vocalist Cynthia Sley, bassist Laura Kennedy, and drummer Dee Pop, Bush Tetras constitute one of the finer extensions of the original No Wave impulse. Sporadically active over the decades, here they return after a long absence with three original members (Kennedy exited after the release of Beauty Lies in 1995 and passed in 2011), with Val Vera (aka Val Opielski, ex Krakatoa, 1000 Yard Stare, etc.) strapping on the bass; this trim five-track outing not only doesn’t sully their rep, it hangs with the earlier work sans hitch. They may be a smidge moodier and less dance-punky than in the early days (heaviness hath not abated), but the change suits them well. A-

Say Sue Me, Where We Were Together (Damnably) Say Sue Me hail from Busan, South Korea, but their sound derives to a significant extent from late 20th century developments out of the United Kingdom. Damnably describes their thing as surf-inspired indie rock, and that’s not off-target, but I’d simply tag ‘em as purveyors of indie pop…except that doing so runs the risk of losing them in a sea of likeminded outfits. The good news is that Say Sue Me aren’t mimics and do a fine job here of establishing a distinct personality across 11 tracks, which means that you won’t mistake them for being British. There are some tangible similarities however, e.g. a less twee Camera Obscura, The Primitives, and briefly, The Vaselines. The longer and increasingly loud “Coming to the End” is suitably sequenced last. A-

REISSUE PICKS: Harold Budd, Luxa (Curious Music) This ’96 full-length was initially a CD-only affair, but no more, as the resuscitated Curious Music offers it on double 180gm black vinyl remastered by Tim Story and pressed at 45RPM in a matte finish gatefold jacket with a high res numbered art print (there’s also a FLAC download available). If you’re thinking this is all a bit extravagant, then chances are you don’t know Budd, an artist for whom aural depth and detail is crucial. Many have been introduced to him through connections to Eno and collabs with Cocteau Twins, but here he goes it alone, and the results are so much more than tranquil, concluding with superb covers of Marion Brown’s “Sweet Earth Flying” and “Pleasure” by Steven Brown (of Tuxedomoon). Altogether a beautiful thing. A-

Sleepyhead, Future Exhibit Goes Here (Drawing Room) Drawing Room’s third recent ’90s indie rock reissue (after Sandra Bell’s Net and a double vinyl edition of Kicking Giant’s debut CD) is a 2LP twinning the second and third full-lengths (Starduster, 1994, and the formerly CD-only Communist Love Songs, ’96) from the NYC trio of bassist Michael Galinsky, drummer-vocalist Rachel McNally, and guitarist-vocalist Chris O’Rourke. Sleepyhead’s thrust can be considered no-frills, essentially alternating betwixt melodic punk and tough power-pop with guitar noise appropriate for the era and scene, so some will likely wonder what’s the big deal. I’ll just say that it went down sweet at the time and gives me a warm feeling now. Comes with a book collecting band reminiscences and Galinsky’s ace photographs. A-

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Graded on a Curve:
Pere Ubu,
Les Haricots Sont Pas Salés 1987-1991

Historical shorthand locates 1991 as the year rock normalcy exploded, but naturally the story isn’t so tidy. Pockets of unusualness were already afoot, and the recordings by Pere Ubu corralled in Les Haricots Sont Pas Salés 1987-1991 detail the post-punk/ art-rock cornerstone’s graceful and cogent horizontal move into the proximity of plain sight. The chronological third of four career-spanning box sets and the last of the bunch to see release, it houses ’88’s The Tenement Year, ’89’s Cloudland, ’91’s Worlds in Collision, and an LP of additional relevant material, The Lost Album. Another chapter in what’s significantly more than a standard retrospective, it’s out now on vinyl though Fire Records.

If the roots of the ’90’s upside-down musical narrative are firmly planted in events that transpired in the decade prior, then it’s fitting that the prime example presented by Les Haricots Sont Pas Salés 1987-1991 is the direct byproduct not of the Pere Ubu documented by The Architecture of Language 1979-1982, but of the gap between, and specifically ’87’s Blame the Messenger, the second LP from David Thomas & the Wooden Birds (the second of his solo outfits after David Thomas & the Pedestrians).

Along with the sui generis shaping presence of Thomas, The Tenement Year featured all the participants from Blame the Messenger, namely guitarist Jim Jones, bassist Tony Maimone, drummer-percussionist Chris Cutler, and crucially, the synthesizer of Allen Ravenstine. The story goes that after integrating older Ubu material into the Wooden Birds’ live set, the decision was made to contact drummer Scott Krauss, revive the Pere Ubu moniker, and record new material.

These efforts were not designed to reap the rewards of any reunion gravy-train (which in those days didn’t exist for bands residing on the cult fringe) but were sensibly intended to place fresh musical developments in their proper context. Bluntly, the Wooden Birds were sounding a lot like Ubu. Adding Krauss sweetened this circumstance.

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Graded on a Curve:
His Name Is Alive,
Black Wings

His Name Is Alive is the long-running genre-shifting project/ band of Michigander Warren Defever. Of his recent recordings, none are more interesting than Patterns of Light, a release that stemmed from an invite to record at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Switzerland. His latest is Black Wings, which first emerged as a CDR included in the 2016 Patterns of Light Super Set, and then as a standalone CDR last year. Both of those editions are sold out, so Black Wings’ return to print on 2LP by Happy Happy Birthday to Me is welcome. Representing in miniature Defever’s steadfast eschewal of stylistic predictability across 29 tracks while existing as its own intriguing thing, it’s available now.

Initially coming to prominence on 4AD circa 1990 with debut Livonia, His Name Is Alive surely benefited from the association with the tastemaker label, but it’s also true that as Defever and his collaborators progressed, and especially as the 4AD run neared its culmination, they left some fans befuddled and a few even betrayed by a refusal to maintain an immediately identifiable sound.

Others welcomed the range, and that’s the camp to which I belong, though not so passionately that I snatched up his simultaneous outpouring of non-4AD material (what I have heard was cool). This divide perhaps reached an apex with 2001’s Someday My Blues Will Cover the Earth, a ’90s-style slow-jam Soul/ R&B outing (featuring the spiff vocals of Lovetta Pippen) that’s roughly a thousand miles away from not just the arty ethereality of Livonia but also the indie-psych-pop of ’96’s excellent (Saturday Looks Good to Me-foreshadowing) Stars on E.S.P.

Instead of those who guardedly investigate to see if Defever’s back in their ballpark, it’s the folks eagerly anticipating what Defever will do next (while obviously having their personal favorites, one of mine being ’07’s Sweet Earth Flower, his tribute to the jazz saxophone great Marion Brown) that will be the most receptive audience for Black Wings, though listeners introduced to Patterns of Light due to their love of particle colliders and/ or musical heaviness may want to check it out, as well.

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Graded on a Curve:
New in Stores, April
2018, Part One

Part one of the TVD Record Store Club’s look at the new and reissued releases presently in stores for April, 2018. 

NEW RELEASE PICKS: Mind Over Mirrors, Bellowing Sun (Paradise of Bachelors) I’ve been in the camp of Harmoniumist-electronic specialist-composer Jaime Fennelly for a while now, but this 2LP, which captures Mind Over Mirrors’ evolution from a truly solo project to a dialogue with added participants (documented on last year’s Undying Color) to a solidified full-on band, is a knockout. Commissioned by the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, Bellowing Sun’s gist pertains to the celestial, and unsurprisingly, the kosmische aura is strong. But there’s a coinciding elemental focus that’s beautifully expressed in Janet Bean’s vocals/ zither, Jon Mueller’s drumming, Jim Becker’s fiddling, and Fennelly’s leadership. Namechecking Popul Vuh, Henry Flynt, Terry Riley, and Alice Coltrane is no reach. Superb. A

Air Waves, Warrior (Western Vinyl) Here’s full-length #3 (and #2 for Western Vinyl) from Brooklyn-based Nicole Schneit. Described by the label as indie pop, that’s immediately perceptible in opening gem “Home.” Guitar is present, but so are electronic elements, though this doesn’t morph the indie pop into synth pop (the beginning of the title track is an exception), and that’s cool with me. Closer “Blue Fire” does exude a singer-songwriter-ish new wave vibe, reminding me of ‘Til Tuesday (there’s probably a better comparison, but damn if I can put a finger on it right now), and hey, that’s cool with me, too. A poem by Adrienne Rich was the song’s inspiration, which is quite fitting for an album concerned with struggle (Schneit’s own as a queer woman, her mother’s battle with cancer). Nice cover photo, also. A-

REISSUE PICKS: Scientist & Prince Jammy, Strike Back! (Real Gone) For this guy, prime dub equates to summertime sounds par excellence, and while I’m admittedly itching for warmer weather, this one has a surplus of sweetness to offer at any time of year: the space-sci-fi theme manifested in both the spiffy cover art and the song titles’ tantalizing hybrids (“Buck Rogers in the Black Hole,” “Flash Gordon Meets Luke Skywalker”); the limited edition of 700 on yellow-green “Lightsaber” vinyl; the production and compositions by Linval Thompson; the top-flight instrumental contributions from the Roots Radics; and naturally, Scientist and Jammy in strong form. The sheer amount of dub that’s available for listening can surely be intimidating, but the studio warpage on display here matches the presentation. A-

Jack Kerouac, Blues and Haikus (Real Gone) It seems with every passing day the allure of this key (in truth, the most key) Beat Generation figure fades a bit more under the harsh light of modernity, but for those who’ve been positively impacted by his writings and are desirous of adding a little of his essence to their vinyl shelves, this is the one to get if you only get one, and for a variety of reasons. First, unlike his likeable debut (which found him accompanied by the okay piano tinkling of comedian-talk show host Steve Allen), this pairs him with the real jazz deal in saxophonists Al Cohn (who also plays piano) and Zoot Sims. Second, it delivers a hearty dose of Kerouac’s poetic-spiritualism. Third, Jack sings! Fourth, the album’s as messy, frustrating, fascinating, and imperfectly beautiful as the man was himself. A-

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  • SUPPORTING YOUR LOCAL INDIE SHOPS SINCE 2007


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