Everest:
The Week at TVD

The guys in Everest love independent record shops and the sound of 180-gram vinyl as much as we do. We’re excited to have the band guest blogging all week about their lifelong love affair with the LP, the culture of vinyl, and why independent record stores mean so much to them.

Day 3 of the band’s week-long guest blogging features guitarist Joel Graves giving props to his favorite shops, both past and present, and the mutual respect and support of their local record stores. You can check out Day 1 Q&A and Day 2 guest post by frontman Russ Pollard to get caught up on our week with Everest.

“At the beginning of June, Everest bass guitar player Elijah Thomson and I volunteered to drive our gear from Los Angeles, CA to Annapolis, MD to start a two month tour. With our new record Ownerless due in stores at the end of the month, I made a special limited poster to announce the birth.

The plan was to deliver these posters to some of our favorite shops as we traversed the country. Just a way of saying “thanks” and also showing that we support these neighborhood institutions that have done so much to support us.

Before we left, posters went to some of our local favorites including Fingerprints in Long Beach, Origami Vinyl in Echo Park, and Amoeba Music in Hollywood. All of these stores are places that we actually shop, and we have personal relationships through the years with the owners and employees.

For example, when we finished our record this year, Rand from Fingerprints was among the first to come out to the studio to hear what we’d done. And we were proud to share. Our respect for and friendship with these stores is inspiring. If you’re going to tough it out through the stormy seas of the music industry these days, you really have to love music. These folks truly bring the passion, and it’s meaningful.

Independent record stores have been a big part of my life. I first started exploring bootlegs at Record PX during high school in Fountain Valley, CA (the store’s long departed). I later moved on to digging through bins at the legendary bastion of everything punk rock. Vinyl Solution, in Huntington Beach, CA (still alive!) and to Hollywood’s badass Aron’s Records (also departed).

The few indie stores that still exist are fighting to keep their heads above water, much like bands like ourselves. The major chains have essentially given up sharing independent music, but nothing can replace the tactile and human experience of chatting with record store employees, and holding these works of art in your hands.

When I think of my favorite stores, there are a flood of great places and experiences that come to mind. On this trip, we’ve visited Twist & Shout in Denver, Vintage Vinyl in St. Louis, and Sidetracks in Charlottesville, to name a few. We also have very fond memories of past visits to Record Exchange in Boise, Grimey’s in Nashville, Cactus Music in Houston and the sadly departed Ear X-stacy in Louisville.

Sure the times they are a-changin’, but I hope that these sanctuaries can keep fighting the good fight. There are enough cookie cutter corporate slop shops that already inundate our lives… so I hope that folks don’t stop supporting their communities, supporting the artists, and enriching their lives with music that sounds like music… not crappy MP3s… Viva la vinyl.”
Joel Graves, Everest (stage left)

Everest’s Ownerless is in stores now!

Everest Official | Facebook | Twitter

This entry was posted in The TVD Storefront. Bookmark the permalink. Trackbacks are closed, but you can post a comment.
  • SUPPORTING YOUR LOCAL INDIE SHOPS SINCE 2007


  • Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text
  • Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text