In rotation: 9/14/17

A new record store and coffee shop is opening in city centre, Owners of Cafe Artum in Corporation Street have launched a Kickstarter fund to help them run it: An exciting new cafe and record store is set to open in the heart of Birmingham city centre. Cafe Artum, a record store, coffee shop and art space, will open in Corporation Street in late November or early December. The store is a joint project by Jayson Wynters and Christy Lakeman and will be the latest in a growing number of independent coffee shops in the city centre. Jayson, 34, has 20 years of experience running music events. He wants to take advantage of “vinyl’s comeback.” He said: “I go all over the world to collect records. Vinyl’s made a massive comeback in the past few years but Birmingham has been the slowest to react to it. We do believe a new record store is what is missing in the city, we haven’t had a new one for 15 years.”

MetaModern Music record shop has that San Francisco psychedelic ’60s vibe — but without the bongs: CINCINNATI — The city has another new record store, and Markbreit and Madison in Oakley is feeling a little more like Haight and Ashbury. MetaModern Music opened June 13 at 2942 Markbreit Ave. in the building just across from 20th Century Theater. The shop is covered in tie-dyed tapestries and filled with crates of records, with more inventory coming in everyday. There are new releases and classics, new and used records, and three rows of owner J.C. Connor’s favorites: “There’s some really bizarre stuff in there.”

Annual sales of vinyl records will surpass $1BN (£820M) for the first time since the 1980s this year: Vinyl sales in the US dropped 6 per cent in the first half of 2016 and the number of people willing to spend an average of $20 (£16.45) on a record may be nearing its limit, Deloitte’s report said. Paul Lee, Deloitte’s head of technology, media and telecoms research said that despite the ubiquity of music streaming services meaning music is more accessible than ever, “consumers are choosing to buy something tangible and nostalgic and at a price point that provides record companies with significant revenues.” Mr Lee fell short of hailing a full-scale resurgence of vinyl as a leading music format however, saying that it is unlikely to be the major source of growth for the music industry.

Under the hammer: Dr Rock’s 5,000-strong record collection: IT is a treasure trove that a vinyl collector could only dream of – 5,000 records, everything from rock ‘n’ roll and blues to jazz and Mongolian folk – with much of it signed. And now it’s about to go under the hammer. The collection of ‘Dr Rock’ himself, BBC radio presenter and biographer Charles White, is to go on sale at Ryedale Auctions in Kirkbymoorside later this month, alongside an impressive collection of memorabilia – including art, photographs, and the jewel in the crown, Bill Haley’s gold disc for Rock Around the Clock. Mr White, who has hosted his Sunday night rock show on BBC Radio York for 25 years, has amassed the collection since he was a child growing up in Ireland. “As a kid when I first heard rock ‘n’ roll it was like getting out of the bastille – it was full of fun,” he said.

Austin Welcomes New Short Run Vinyl Pressing Plant: Further evidence that the return of vinyl is as strong as ever, the city of Austin will soon see a new vinyl pressing plant known as Gold Rush Vinyl- this is good news for indie acts who often have lengthy waits when ordering their music on vinyl. I guess that the vinyl comeback is here to stay, as another new pressing plant is about to come on line, this one in Austin. When band manager Caren Kelleher found that she couldn’t get timely vinyl delivery for the bands she manages, she decided that it was time for a vinyl plant that specialized in that kind of order. According to an article in the Austin American Stateman, Kelleher is opening a vinyl record pressing plant in Austin called Gold Rush Vinyl that specializes in printing 1,000 copy orders.

Vinyl Fetish Record Show at Asheville Music Hall, September 30 at 12:00 pm – 6:00 pm: Downtown Asheville will be alive with the sound of… record collectors, panting, pleading, wheeling, and dealing on the two floors of the Asheville Music Hall building, which houses the One Stop Deli in the lower level. Dealers from throughout the Southeast will be displaying their wares, from collectible vinyl records and CDs, to posters, magazines, and memorabilia. There will also be DJs spinning music all day long, as well as food and beverages (including beer) available for purchase. It’s FREE to the general public, although if you want to take advantage of early bird admission at 11AM, that will cost $5.

Rewind the years at a listening session for LP lovers in Mumbai’s antiSOCIAL: Rewind the years. Go back in time to the ’60s and early ’70s. Imagine you’re a rock ‘n’ roll or jazz fan with bushy sideburns and a wardrobe full of flared pants who feels like listening to his favourite LP. What do you do? You take the record carefully out of its album sleeve, place it with precision on your turntable, and then sit back on your sofa if you’re at home, or shake a leg with friends if you’re at a party. Fast-forward now to the late ’90s. Vinyls [“Vinyls” is not a word. Would you say “deers?” Of course not. —Ed.] have given way to cassettes, which, too, are ceding relevance to CDs. So you decide to get rid of your records because, given their size, they are eating up too much space on your shelf. A friend offers to take them off you, since he remains a vinyl enthusiast, and so you tell him, “Here you go, take the whole lot if you want, even So Near, So Far [which is your favourite jazz LP].”

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