In rotation: 9/21/17

Love vinyl? This music store is offering a rocking discount for Sentinel readers as it celebrates 40th birthday: A popular music store is celebrating 40 years in business by offering customers a rocking discount. A&A Music in Congleton started selling records in Bridge Street in 1977 and has now expanded to offer classes and music accessories. Current owner David Wedgbury started working at the store 20 years ago before taking it over from previous owner Alan Farrar. David, aged 44, of Congleton, said: “We started trading in Bridge Street but moved to High Street opposite the town hall just over three years ago because I wanted to start up a music school.

Ear Candy’s John Fleming keeps music fans’ shelves filled: It’s Friday at Ear Candy Music, which means it’s release day. John Fleming is steadily receiving shipments and checking to make sure his vinyl copies of Beyonce’s “Lemonade,” out this very day, have arrived. He’s also juggling customers and phone calls. He shoots the breeze with a guy who’s picked out $50 worth of records. A 20-something-year-old wants to exchange a record. A 60-something-year-old buys a concert ticket. One guy asks where he can park and says he’s from out of town. Fleming asks if he’s here to see the Mac DeMarco show at the Wilma that night. He says no, he’s on a road trip. Like a loyal music fan, he looked up record shops along the way.

Albums stolen from car of Peoria record store owner: PEORIA — Craig Moore, owner of the Younger Than Yesterday used record store, 2615 N. University St., reported to police that six boxes of records were stolen from his car Tuesday. Moore told police his car was parked on Gift Avenue. He believed the theft could have occurred last week when the records were first loaded in his car. Moore said he first noticed the theft on Tuesday. He reported there were about 65 records in each box with an estimated value of $2,500 for each box.

Troy’s Jim Barrett moves his longstanding radio show to WAIX-FM 106.1: …Barrett isn’t known simply as the owner of River Street Beat Shop. For longer than most of the musicians and customers who walk through his doors, he’s been a staple to local radio. Since 1967, Barrett has hosted Kaleidoscope — a radio show where he mixes classic rock tunes with contemporary and local music. This week, his show jumps up the dial from WVCR-FM 88.3 The Saint to WAIX-FM 106.1 The X. “I had a phenomenal, wonderful experience where I was at Siena,” said Barrett. “They treated me like a million bucks. But, I was ready for a change. I needed a change. My only regret is that I’m not working with my dear friend Dean Charette. That was very hard to walk away from, because we’re very close. But, even he understood that I needed it. I’m 71. How much more do I have in the tank? I want to be with a bunch of young people who are fired up about music.

X-Ray Records Are Changing The Business Of Vinyl: Bone music is back. Los Angeles-based label Blank City Records is investing in X-ray audio and vinyl records pressed on medical X-rays. The last time people were listening to records on X-rays was 1950s Russia, during the cultural blackout of government censorship. The founders of Black City Records, Marc Sallis and Brandon Burkart, are finding success as the old becomes new. As musicians themselves, they have plenty of experience putting music out through labels — but not on X-rays. “I came across ribs recordings. Back in the 40s and 50s in Russia when they couldn’t get access to Western music, they would put it out on these X-rays,” says Sallis. “And I thought, wouldn’t it be great to do a record label pressing on X-rays?

From Vinyl LPs To Rabbit Ears, 5 Old Technologies That Millennials And Boomers Should Consider: An appreciation of the LP’s full-throated sound accounts for its recent comeback. Recording artists largely drop new albums via MP3 files that you can download to your phone, computer and other digital devices. But albums are increasingly being released on vinyl as well. Another great side benefit of LPs: the resurgence of cover art and album notes. In the old days, LPs usually had distinctive covers that became as recognizable as the music. (Think Beatles Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Heart Club’s Band.) People would analyze the art along with the music. Song lyrics often appeared on the album’s inner paper dust jacket. The resurrection of the LP has made this all possible once again.

Punk singer in Beyonce album mix-up has been ‘laughing for three days straight’: It’s a mistake that Columbia Records has chalked up to a “human error” at a German plant, causing the misprint to be shipped across Europe and as far away as Australia. For Steel and her bandmates, the mix-up has meant a surreal week filled with a flurry of international attention, including an interview with Vanity Fair and media outlets across the globe. “I’ve been laughing for three straight days,” Steel told CTVNews.ca on Tuesday.

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