In rotation: 3/5/18

A list of rumoured Record Store Day 2018 exclusives has emerged: Wantlists at the ready? Though the official rundown of this year’s Record Store Day exclusives has yet to be announced, industrious Reddit users have begun compiling a preemptive list of expected releases, reports Exclaim. The incomplete list contains North American exclusives, presumably from one distributor, omitting many major labels and European releases. Five of these releases have been confirmed: the David Bowie records, Led Zeppelin 7″, and a Call Me By Your Name 10″. Record Store Day 2018’s official list will be announced on 6th March. Check out the tentative releases below.

Absolute Vinyl, one of Boulder’s few remaining record stores, to close at end of March: After slightly fewer than 10 years in business, Absolute Vinyl Records & Stereo will close its doors at the end of March. “We’ve served thousands of customers and sold close to 100,000 records and well over 2,000 pieces of stereo equipment,” said Doug Gaddy, who co-owns the shop with his wife, Annie Gaddy. “I don’t know how those numbers stack up against other stores. But it’s something I can look on and say I’m really pleased with what we were able to provide.” He said that he has sold records in one fashion or another — he used eBay the first year it existed and split his first table at a record show in either 1984 or 1985 — for more than three decades, and he opened Absolute Vinyl, in part, because Boulder was losing independent record shops. (After he closes, the city will have Albums on the Hill and Bart’s Records.)

Melbourne classical music shop Thomas’ plays final song after 96 years in business: At a glance, Thomas’ does not look like a business in trouble. Crowded with customers, its staff are run off their feet with requests for its classical CD range. But many of the visitors have come to say goodbye now news of its closure has broken. “We’re just dealing with all the customers who are really upset and expressing their condolences,” business owner Elisabeth Vodicka says. The decision to close was a long time in the making. “It’s slowly been getting less and less people,” Ms Vodicka says. “There’s a lot of different platforms you can listen to music on, so I think that contributes to the decline in music sales in general. “But classical music is a very particular niche.”

Vinyl revival sets the record straight: METRO DETROIT — Just about everyone who grew up after a certain time in the 20th century had a record collection — or at least their parents did. Vinyl records were once a staple for music fans, who played their favorite albums on hi-fi stereo systems adorned with speakers, oversized knobs and built-in radios. But about 30-35 years ago, as the world fast-tracked to a more digital existence, records were phased out. The compact disc was the new format on which to sing the blues, dance the night away, get jazzy or play air guitar to your favorite tunes. Then came downloading files, YouTube videos and streaming music online. But record albums are back, and this time it seems they are here to stay.

Bozeman’s KGLT swaps vinyl, raises money: Ron Sanchez looks behind a pair of black thick-framed glasses as passersby peruse his collection of vinyl and tapes. “Let’s see, let me do the math,” said Sanchez, when asked how long he’s been collecting vinyl and tapes. “About 55 years.”…Sanchez wasn’t alone in the hustle and bustle of swapping the ancient media of vinyl. He and other record collectors, or “vinyl junkies,” were all part of KGLT’s Spring Vinyl sale and celebration of the radio station’s 50th year on air. The swap is hosted by Friends of KGLT, a separate group that helps raise funds for the radio station, and has been running since 2010. The event brings vinyl collectors from the community together, and helps KGLT with its operational costs. Sanchez said part of showing up at events like the vinyl sale is to make an appearance as a KGLT DJ and meet some of his listeners. He said it’s a treat whenever he can meet people who listen and support the radio station.

The compact disc era may finally be entering its hospice stage: Thirty-five years after the format was introduced as one of the greatest audio advancements since the birth of recorded music — and unwittingly unleashed digitized music into the wild — the once indestructible compact disc received another existential wound in early 2018 after a report that two big box retailers were reassessing their approaches to physical CD sales. Electronics outlet Best Buy will stop carrying most CDs in their stores, and Target is attempting to negotiate with distributors to try to switch to a consignment model, according to sources in the music business who declined to speak on the record for fear of jeopardizing business relationships. The news was first reported by Billboard. The shift further confirms the format’s precipitous fall: Since peak plastic in 2001, CD sales have dropped 88%, from 712 million units to 85.4 million in 2017, according to Nielsen Music.

Mountain Music Museum, ACMA donate vintage records to ETSU: JOHNSON CITY, Tenn. — A rare collection of vintage records was donated Friday to East Tennessee State University by the Mountain Music Museum and the Appalachian Cultural Music Association. Mountain Music Museum Executive Director Rick Dollar said a home was needed for the collection of more than 4,700 records. “The record collection was gifted to the museum several years ago, but we don’t have the space or the resources to store and exhibit them all,” Dollar said in a written statement. “ETSU has one of the most highly respected bluegrass, old-time and country music programs anywhere, so we know the records will be in good hands. Our goal is to see them used for educational purposes.”

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  • SUPPORTING YOUR LOCAL INDIE SHOPS SINCE 2007


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