In rotation: 10/12/18

Boise, ID | The Record Exchange Adds 64,000 Vinyl Albums, 3,000 Cassettes to its Collection: Sometimes, one business’ heartbreaking end can be another’s fresh opportunity. That was exactly the case with the closure of the Yesteryear Shoppe, a 44-year institution selling rare books and vintage records in downtown Nampa. The Idaho Press reports that the shop shuttered in June to make way for a new development, but there is some good news: When Yesteryear flipped its open sign to closed for the last time, its staggeringly large music collection went up for sale—and The Record Exchange in downtown Boise snapped it up. “We were sad to hear of Yesteryear’s closing because we have known Dave Gonzalez and his family for many years and hate seeing another great independent retailer disappear, but we were thrilled to have the opportunity to purchase the collection instead of watching it leave on a truck for California…”

Interviews with women in the vinyl record scene: Jenn D’Eugenio is a badass record collector, indie label maven, and vinyl industry veteran who now works at the esteemed Furnace Record Pressing company in Virginia. Recently, Jenn started interviewing her peers in the record scene “to empower and highlight the women that are working in the vinyl / music industry to create, preserve, improve and enhance the art of music on vinyl.” Check out Women In Vinyl for interviews with the likes of Katy Clove of Merge Records, Italians Do It Better label president Megan Louise Doyle, audio archivist Amanda McCabe, and designer Kate Koeppel who makes fantastic products for vinyl collectors. “Not enough of the female + vinyl focus is on the women behind the record stores, labels, manufacturers, vinyl accessories, etc. and I hope to change that with interviews and stories about these women,” Jenn says.

2018 Making Vinyl Conference: 2018 was yet another great year in the resurgence of the beloved vinyl record. This was Bags Unlimited’s second year attending the Making Vinyl conference in Detroit Rock City and we, yet again, learned a lot about the industry and helped solidify connections with some of the most passionate people you could ever want to meet in the vinyl industry. In the next few paragraphs you’ll find some of the highlights of our conference experience and some pictures of the event. In case you were not aware vinyl records have been on a major upswing in popularity for the past five or six years. There has always been the diehard collectors keeping the medium alive, and they are to be commended for their devotion, but vinyl is back in a big way among many new, mostly young, listeners.

Rega, Pro-Ject and Sony take home best turntable Awards. Rega wins another impressive haul of What Hi-Fi? Awards. Who would have thought we’d still be dishing out turntable Awards in 2018? Well, not us back in 1981. “From today, vinyl LP records are dead,” we declared with the launch of CD in the July 1981 issue of What Hi-Fi?. At one point we even stopped having a turntable category, such was the languishing popularity of the format at points in the 80s and 90s. But forget that, vinyl is back. And Rega is no doubt rather pleased about it. Rega takes home three What Hi-Fi? Awards in the turntable category this year, meaning the company has now won… a huge number of turntable Awards (we’ll leave Rega to do the maths). The eagle-eyed will notice the three winning decks took the same honours last year; a sure-sign of quality.

Yamaha Will Release New Record Players After 27 Years: Yamaha is following Sony by reviving its record players. This month, Yamaha will release two new analog record player models for the first time in 27 years. The decision is likely a reflection of the growing vinyl market in America, estimated to be worth 30 billion yen (US$275.5 million). Yamaha will begin selling its TT-S 303 and MusicCast VINYL 500 models for 58,000 yen (US$449.95) and 90,000 yen (US$699.95), respectively, at the end of the month. The MusicCast model has wireless capabilities, putting it a high-tech step ahead compared to record players of yesteryear. The official Yamaha US site has product pages for both models. Sony announced earlier this year that it added analog record manufacturing to its Sony DADC Japan factory.

All You Need to Know About Collecting Music in Whatever Format You Desire: The Ultimate Guide to Vinyl and More: All You Need to Know About Collecting Essential Music, From Cylinders and CDs to LPs and Tapes by Dave Thompson Have you heard? Vinyl is BACK! While it’s not the most surprising record format to have a resurgence in popular taste (we’re looking at you, 8-Track), this particular news story is starting to show its age. Even as stores like Best Buy and Barnes & Noble phase out CDs to make shelf ready for new LPs (on 180 gram weight with a higher price tag than their forebears)…“There are as many ways to collect as there are collectors to find new ways,” Thompson offers. “And just as nobody can tell you what you should be collecting, nobody can tell you what you shouldn’t.”

Burlington, MA | 5 Things to do this week around Burlington: Boston Vinyl Record Show; Sunday, Oct. 14 at 10 a.m. at Hilton Garden Inn Boston-Burlington, 5 Wheeler Road: Shop over 4,000 square feet filled with dozens of dealers with all styles of music on CDs, DVDs, LPs, 45s, Imports, Box Sets, Rare Pressings, Picture Discs, 12-inch Singles and other music related items. The show runs from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. with free parking on site. Admission is $4.

Coleford’s West End star Emma Hatton in wonderful tribute to her grandfather: Coleford’S West End star Emma Hatton has dedicated her eagerly-awaited new jazz EP to her inspirational ‘grampy’ – releasing it on the very date that would have marked his 100th birthday. “I absolutely love musical theatre but it is no secret that jazz and blues are also a huge part of my life. “If I can encourage my theatre fans to give jazz and blues a listen, or those who know me from the jazz world to come and see a musical then it’s a win win situation.” Emma says the choice of title for her latest EP was a no-brainer. “I was keen to release a vinyl record. We started recording it four months after I turned 33…the coincidence of the playing speed of 33RPM was too great and Thirty Three and a Third was born…”

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