In rotation: 7/14/22

York, UK | York Record Fair set for return to city venue: A popular record fair is returning to York this coming weekend – with thousands of records available to customers under one roof. The well-known York Record Fair returns to the City Screen Cinema in Coney Street this coming Saturday (July 16). A spokesperson for the York Record Fair said: “The collectors bubble just doesn’t seem to burst and bargains from £1 to three figure sums are displayed on the day. “The usual guys and additional traders are in town and the valuation service will return in the form of antiques roadshow style vinyl experts.” The public are welcome to bring along anything from one item to full collections – and the record fair team are also happy to visit to value if its too much to carry through the city to the venue. All ages are welcomed and a new trend of younger collectors are now forming a large part of the attendees to this event.

Mt. Prospect, IL | Three friends to hold massive Vinyl Record Yard Sale July 16 in Mt. Prospect: They’re back. To help meet the demand for increasingly popular vinyl records, three friends Bob, Bob and Fred — each with music industry experience and knowledge — will hold a massive vinyl record yard sale on Saturday, July 16. It will be 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at 306 W. Hiawatha Trail, just off Route 83/Elmhurst Road, in Mount Prospect. Each will have tables of records, CDs and more for sale. The sale will also feature international pressings of popular musicians, CDs, and one-of-a-kind, out-of-print music industry books on a slew of artists. “I’ve been doing this for 15 years,” said Bob Szeliga, the record sale host. “We have all genres of music. Rock, jazz and blues are the best sellers. We each have varied stock, much of it hard to find. For instance, Bob Hurns also has several English first pressings, hard to find in the U.S. “The massive collections Bob and Fred (Prellberg) bring to the sale make this a vinyl record sale mecca.”

Turns Out Haruki Murakami Has An Excellent Record Collection: A new playlist features highlights from it. Plenty of acclaimed writers have close ties to the world of music. Even in this realm, though, Haruki Murakami has engaged deeply with music across the bulk of his body of work. That his bibliography includes a novel titled Norwegian Wood is one sign of his deep of music, as is the fact that he once owned a jazz club. Murakami has also incorporated real-life bars and clubs where he’s gone to see music into his books. His fondness for music doesn’t end there, however. In 2018, Murakami announced that he would donate his massive collection of vinyl to Tokyo’s Waseda University. All of which begs the question: what’s it like to listen to Murakami’s record collection? Recently, Far Out assembled a playlist featuring selections from Murakami’s array of vinyl. Given the size of his collection, this is one you can listen to for a while; the 100 songs there include work by the likes of Sonny Rollins, Herbie Hancock and Hoagy Carmichael.

Denver, CO | Vinyl Thursdays at Zeppelin Station Make for an Exciting Summer of Music: The entrancing synth beat layered with a majestic piano harmony of the Eurythmics’ “Here Comes the Rain” drifted from Ryan Dykstra’s turntable as the rain came down over the RiNo district. Come rain or shine, Zeppelin Station’s Vinyl Thursdays are sure to invite a musical delight to your week. Zeppelin Station characterizes itself as a global food hall, offering vendors serving banh mi, Japanese street food, fried chicken, tacos and more. …One of the exciting ways that Zeppelin Station is immersing itself into the community of music lovers surrounding them is through their Vinyl Thursdays event. Held every other week, Vinyl Thursdays takes a classic spin on DJing. Using only vinyl to soundtrack the night, DJ and nightlife promoter Ryan Dykstra brings his love for the retro listening experience to Zeppelin Station. Every other Thursday, with his bus filled with vinyl and a turntable ready to roll, Dykstra slings numerous records throughout the night, catering to the expansive music taste of Denverites.

Why you should collect vintage vinyl records: At a time when the majority of people get their music via digital download, it is refreshing to know that the sale of vinyl records has increased and the demand for vintage vinyl records is higher than ever. But, why should you collect vintage vinyl? Do older vinyls sound better? Collectors of vintage vinyl are drawn to the quality of its sound, and this is due to the fact that vinyl records use analogue rather than digital. At the most basic level, this means that a vinyl record will always have more musical data than, for example, an MP3 file, making the sound more complex. With a vintage vinyl record in good condition, all that is required is a turntable with a good needle. For the collector, contemporary music formats offer an ‘artificial’ sound that lacks the nuance of vinyl, and you can’t beat the texture that you get from the crackle of the needle in the groove!

Celebrating the art of the album cover: For the record. In the mid-1980s, curator, gallerist, and composer Antoine de Beaupré began frequenting a record shop in Paris that sold imports from the United States. “At the time, it was the only place you could find new music,” recalls de Beaupré, who would drop by once a week to purchase an album. From these humble beginnings, an extraordinary record collection was born, one that includes over 15,000 albums. Last month, de Beaupré brought together 200 of the most innovative and influential 12×12 inch works for the exhibition, For the Record: Photography & The Art of The Album Cover, at The Photographers’ Gallery in London. Featuring works by luminaries including Robert Frank, Robert Mapplethorpe, William Eggleston, Helen Levitt, Irving Penn, and Nan Goldin, For the Record was a tour de force that explored the vital intersection of music, photography, art, and commerce.

CDs are making a comeback. Here’s how we got to know them almost 40 years ago: Like vinyl before it, an old format shows signs of returning. Don’t kick those CD towers to the curb just yet. You may still need them for storage. Declaring CDs dead is tempting, given consistently declining sales over the past several years. In March, the Recording Industry Association of America released its year-end revenue report, which showed that almost one billion units of the shiny medium were sold in the U.S. in 2000, compared to just 46.6 million in 2021. But 2021 also saw a nearly 50 per cent jump in sales from the previous year, making it the first time CD sales had increased since 2004. In June 2022, a headline on Billboard.com boldly proclaimed that CDs are back. The music industry watcher highlighted how both BTS and Beyoncé have “hopped on the seemingly retro trend” of releasing their latest albums on CD. Tech review website Engadget described the CD revival as “inevitable.”

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