The TVD Storefront

Chris Maxwell,
The TVD First Date

“When I think about the importance of records in my life, I see black vinyl signposts at some of the most important crossroads.”

“The first being my uncle Steve’s bedroom in my grandparents’ house is Morrilton, Arkansas. My mom and I lived next door to my grandparents. She was a single working mom so I spent a lot of time next door with Mamaw and Papaw. Boredom figured heavily into my routine. My Uncle Steve was a young uncle and played organ in a local band.

When he wasn’t around I would sneak into his room and flick the long switch on his massive Pioneer stereo. The light glowed bluish-green and a miniature party would begin. One of the records that stands out in my mind is the Cheech & Chong record Los Cochinos. I would put that record on and start working my way through my Uncles’s Playboys he had hidden in his closet.

This was pre-masturbation so I would just flit through, curious about the female form while the sound of Cheech & Chong inhaling deeply on cartoon sized joints played in the background. No one had really explained sex and drugs to me but from what I could tell from the die cut cover that revealed pot hidden in the door when you opened it and the way Steve’s Playboys were buried in the closet, sex and drugs were suppose to be naughty fun—I was all in.

The first record I bought was with lawn-mowing money around the age of nine. It was a K-Tel record called Believe In Music, 22 original hits by the original artists. The album opens up with “Brandy” by Looking Glass. The other songs that still rank high in the songs-that-age-well category are “Maggie May,” “Hold Your Head High” and “Backstabbers.” I did suffer, however, from not one but two Donny Osmond songs.

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The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve: Typical Girls,
Volume 5

In May of 2016, Emotional Response Records issued the first installment in their Typical Girls compilation series, an endeavor dedicated to “current female fronted punk and indie bands from around the globe.” Here we are in 2020 and the label is dishing out a fifth volume, which includes 16 acts in styles ranging from the expected shades of post-punk to the somewhat less common but totally welcome pop-rocking guitar hookiness to pummeling hardcore. It’s out February 21 on vinyl and digital.

This series of comps is named after a song by The Slits, with the intention to pay tribute to that band’s groundbreaking ways, in terms of kicking over gender barriers to be sure, but also stylistically, as Ari Up and company reside at the head of the UK post-punk class. By extension, tipping the hat to “Typical Girls” is a potentially quick clue-in as to what to expect when needle hits vinyl.

With their opening cut “Mooncake,” Melbourne, Australia’s Empat Lima land in that zone with authority. Self-described as a “beat-garage trio,” they tickle my fancy with a little late ’70s-early ’80s Rough Trade angularity but with an undercurrent of humor in the execution. The song reasserts the modus operandi of the Typical Girls series quite nicely, but just as quickly Color TV of Los Angeles deepen matters with a cut that hits closer to Bomp! Records-style gal-fronted power-pop.

It’s Tipper Newton singing and playing guitar, and she holds down the spot with enthusiasm and panache. Like all top-notch power-pop, “Anybody’s Girl” thrives through repeated play; it sounds fine on this comp, but it calls out for a pressing on 45 RPM vinyl (it has been issued as a cassette single, but it’s sold out).

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A morning mix of news for the vinyl inclined

In rotation: 2/19/20

Lincoln City, OR | Output Music reopening in Lincoln City, owners make big plans for 2020: Output Music was a music community cornerstone for Lincoln County from 2005 to 2011. Now, 2020 will see Output reopening as Output Records. Lincoln City’s new again music store will sell vinyl records, turntables, music accessories and a curated selection of clothing, homegoods and accessories. The owners, Corrie and Taj Richardson, say they want to help the Central Oregon Coast get into vinyl records. “The music format has made a big comeback over the last 10 years; we’re selling turntables too, so if someone doesn’t have one already, we can get them set up with a turntable, speakers, and their first record for around $150 bucks,” the Richardsons said. Beyond selling records and goods, Output Records has a mission statement that focuses on building the music community on the Central Oregon Coast. “A big part of us wanting to reopen Output is to build up a music community that gets the kids involved with music,” the Richardson’s said.

Bury, UK | Vinyl frontier – Bury at forefront of record revival: …This renewed interest has also cultivated a renaissance in high street record shops, reversing years of decline and closures which saw dealers outside major cities almost go extinct. Last summer new independent record store Wax and Beans opened at The Art Picture House ­in Haymarket Street and proved in instant smash hit. Voracious appetite for vinyl has meant the outlet is already drawing up blueprints to relocate to larger premises to better meet the needs of Bury’s music lovers. Ben Soothill, Wax and Beans’ owner, said: “I think interest in vinyl has always been there, it’s just that it has not been completely accessible. “With the push we have given it on social media and the service we provide in store I think it has struck a chord with people. “They realise it’s there, and it’s a format they have loved, and it’s really taken off.

Boston, MA | Monumental Market: Jamaica Plain’s Antidote to Spotify and Starbucks: Ask anyone who’s scoured through endless rows of vinyl in subterranean vaults during the 90s and they’ll be the first to tell you that independent record stores in Boston are a pale reflection of a once robust heyday. Second Coming Records? Dead. Pipeline Records? Dead. Mojo? Long dead. Newbury Comics? Thankfully flatlining. Even the venerable Skippy White’s—whose six-decade longevity is one of the more unique phenomena to occur during the fray of the “death of independent music retailer” ballyhoo—announced its imminent departure in December. … In Your Ear, Planet and Nuggets have collectively endured close to a century’s worth of changes in both shopping habits and the music industry. The aforementioned specialty shops like Armageddon and Deep Thoughts continue to thrive specifically because of their appeal to otherwise marginal tastes. It’s not about resurgence, but an enduring need for the tactile.

Pittsburgh, PA | Us: Turntable Doctor hopes to keep vinyl spinning: Both guys liked things that go round and round. But when the two friends parted ways as business partners 47 years ago, one landed a job with the Hubble Space Telescope, which goes round and round 340 miles above Earth, while the other continued making sure that record albums continue rotating 33⅓, 45 and 78 rpm on turntables. Today we’re focused on Vince Bomba, 63, of Mt. Lebanon, who still repairs turntables at Galaxie Electronics in Squirrel Hill, a Murray Avenue business that shares a second floor with Jerry’s Records (which sells the vinyl albums that Vince’s turntables play.) Walk up those steps and — Biff! Ping! Bam! — you’re in a time warp. Nowadays most turntable repairmen are fossils. From 1990 until 2007, turntables teetered on the brink of technological extinction that claimed cassettes, manual typewriters and pay phones. But like Alec Baldwin, vinyl has a knack for resurrection.

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The TVD Storefront

Screamadelica: Why Primal Scream’s 1991 Opus was the Most Important Album of
the Year

Today we remember producer Andrew Weatherall who passed away on Monday, February 17 with a look back from our archives.Ed.

1991 is remembered by many as the year that “punk” broke: the year that Nirvana’s Nevermind signaled the death of glam metal and prompted a revolution in the music industry. But to be fair, Nirvana, and many of their contemporaries, were still trafficking in guitar music. Angry, inspired and powerful guitar music, but yeah, it was still guitar music that was rooted in the past.

Over in the UK, the most important and forward-thinking music was dance music, particularly house music. The kids who organized raves and ran pirate radio stations were inspired by the DIY ethics of punk. But the music was futuristic, and producers made no attempt at referencing pop music’s past. While many balked at the rise of house music, its cultural reach was undeniable. If you were serious about music or youth culture, there was no way you could ignore it.

At the end of 1989, things looked grim for Primal Scream. Despite a promising early run of singles on Creation Records, their debut album, Sonic Flower Groove, was over-polished and short on tunes. Their second release, Primal Scream, was marginally better but managed to alienate the twee cognoscenti due to the band’s open embrace of the MC5, The Stooges, long hair and leather trousers and all things “rawk.”

But it wasn’t a total disaster. One of the more powerful tracks on the self-titled album was a ballad called “I’m Losing More than I’ll Ever Have.” This tune caught the attention of DJ and journalist Andrew Weatherall. Weatherall became friendly with the group and, after writing a favorable live review, was asked to do a remix. Despite Weatherall’s lack of studio experience, the DJ returned (after six or seven attempts) with “Loaded,” a stunning remix that stripped down the song and filtered it through acid house, dub reggae, and minimal electronica.

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The TVD Storefront

TVD Radar: Songs for Australia, vinyl benefit comp in stores 6/20

VIA PRESS RELEASE | Songs for Australia is an extraordinary album made by a collection of global artists who have each donated their time to record a cover of an Australian song. Songs for Australia was made to raise money for organizations in Australia who are working towards creating a better future for the country and helping to rebuild during and after the bushfire crisis. It will be digitally released Thursday March 5 through BMG. The album will be released on vinyl and CD in June.

At the heart of the record is Australian songwriter and musician, Julia Stone. Recording in London over the new year period, Stone learned her mother was being evacuated from Lake Conjola on the south coast of New South Wales. Stone watched the unfolding bushfire crisis on the news, along with the rest of the world, feeling helpless, frustrated and distressed. Despite the vast distance between her and her home, her deep connection with it and her horror at its unfolding destruction dominated the days that followed. Late one night, she showed her producer and good friend Thomas Bartlett her favorite Australian songs, songs that over time had settled themselves in her heart. Together they decided that she should record one. The next day they recorded Midnight Oil’s “Beds Are Burning.”

At first, their collaboration was simply a creative outlet for the sadness Stone was feeling for the situation at hand. But she realized her sadness was even deeper and more far-reaching than that, connected to the history of intense sadness in Australia in relation to many of the misguided political and social choices that have been made. Stone wanted the song to connect with its origins—written 33 years ago about indigenous land rights—and so began exploring the information relating to the inattention to indigenous wisdom on land management. She decided to make a clip to accompany the recording that would incorporate a broader commentary on these issues.

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The TVD Interview

In the Light: Lez Zeppelin’s metaphysical ‘Physical Graffiti’

Steph Paynes meets me under the awning at the Gramercy Theatre, where the marquee smugly declares that Lez Zeppelin’s performance of Physical Graffiti tonight is sold out. She certainly looks like a rock star: long black hair, leather pants, sunglasses inside. She radiates cool. I feel conspicuously uncool standing beside her, but the bouncer gives me a guest pass anyway and I follow Steph into the auditorium, where a gaggle of roadies are setting up the stage rig. We trade handshakes and hellos and head downstairs to the greenroom.

The Gramercy has a tumble-down glamour about it, with that weird patterned wallpaper which could just as easily be an artifact of the psychedelic decades or the Victorian era. We make ourselves comfortable on the couch, already chatting. Steph is easy to talk to, and while I set up to record the interview, she tells me a story about how she once forgot to turn her tape recorder on while interviewing Ian Anderson—for Playboy, of all publications. “At the time they were a real magazine,” she says. Back then she was doing what I’m doing now: writing about music.

“I was working as a guitar player while I was writing for a long time,” she explains, when I ask how she got from there to here. “I was playing with Ronnie Spector, and I was a Ronnette, basically… odd but true.” Around the same time, she was rediscovering her love of Led Zeppelin. “After hearing so much music and playing so much music, this music just stunned me again with how really, truly great it was… So I just thought, oh it’ll be fun. I’ll get a bunch of girls together and we’ll just play this music.” Originally, her aspirations were modest; she didn’t expect to be playing more than one or two gigs a month, for “fifty bucks [and] a couple of beers.” A decade later, Lez Zeppelin has a jam-packed touring schedule and fans all over the world—including Jimmy Page. But more on that anon.

“I realized, If I’m gonna do this I really need to do it the right way,” she says. “Because if you do it badly, especially as a female musician… boy, you’ll not only be embarrassing yourself, but it would be bad for female musicians period.” Fortunately, Steph is no slouch in the rehearsal room, or as a recruiter. Finding the right women to join her on the Lez Zeppelin venture and passionate devotion to the project turned it into a phenomenon that soon surpassed her expectations. “The second we started to play out, people just lost their minds, because they really, really wanted to hear this,” she says. “And hearing it from women, who were delivering this power, was really unexpected. It was shocking people.”

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TVD UK

UK Artist of the Week:
I am HER

Feeling a bit angsty? Well, so are I am HER and they’re definitely not about to apologise for it. Get ready for some ferocious female-fronted alt-rock at its finest for this week’s Artist of The Week.

I am HER’s latest single “Big Monster” kicks off simply enough with just lead singer Julie Riley and an acoustic guitar aggressively strumming at the forefront. As the chorus kicks in however, so does the electric guitar and it means business. This is the first time I am HER have added an electric guitar to their post-punk sound, in the process creating something electrifying and fresh. Fans of PJ Harvey or The Kills will feel at home here.

Julie is no stranger to the music industry, having previously fronted ’90s cult band Rosa Mota and is now breaking away into something vibrant and new, bringing drummer Jeff Townsin along with her. Together the are creating fierce post-punk soundscapes that mean business—and we can’t get enough.

“Big Monster” is in stores now.

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The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve:
Jan St. Werner,
Molocular Meditation

Molocular Meditation is the new record from Jan St. Werner, who is likely best-known as half of the electronic duo Mouse on Mars. The record offers the titular 19-minute track on side A featuring the voice of the late Mark E. Smith, plus two more shorter pieces on side two where the leader of The Fall speaks, those cuts surrounding a longer cut based on the Renaissance writings of Giordano Bruno. Folks into Werner’s Fiepblatter Catalogue should devour this set without a hiccup, but Smith’s presence will surely broaden the record’s audience. Appropriately, the contents are as appealingly challenging as the rest of Werner’s solo work. It’s out February 21 through Editions Mego.

The first thing to know about this record is that it is not a posthumously assembled cash-in. Famed as the sui generis sole constant member of post-punk cornerstone The Fall, Mark E. Smith died on January 24, 2018, but the electroacoustic composition on side one premiered as a multi-channel installation at Cornerhouse, Manchester in 2014.

This is a re-edited stereo version of the original Molocular Meditation, and in simultaneously showcasing Smith’s vocal observations and general disdain for what the label tags as the “apolitical British upper class,” Werner does a solid job of magnifying his collaborator’s presence while deepening the dimension of the piece overall through what’s succinctly described as experimental electronics.

Werner is nothing if not intensely attentive to the sounds at his disposal. It’s worthy of note that the vinyl of Molocular Meditation was cut with a diamond needle so that the LP possesses as much sonic range as the digital. This may read as weird to folks to have just accepted the argument that digital is inherently inferior to analogue, but in a truth to materials sense, it’s often the case (at least in my experience) that digital recordings often sound best played back digitally (a la the film maxim that images shot on celluloid look best projected on celluloid).

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A morning mix of news for the vinyl inclined

In rotation: 2/18/20

Burlington, VT | Soundbites: Lacking Lacquer? This week, multiple music news outlets reported a catastrophic fire at Apollo Masters in Banning, Calif. The facility produces “the lacquer used in the production of master discs, from which commercial vinyl records are made, as well as the styli used in the pressing process,” according to Consequence of Sound. The blog went on to report that “the loss could lead to a major delay or reduction in the production of vinyl records on a worldwide scale.” That got me thinking: Will this calamity trickle down to our local Burlington Record Plant? The word from the plant’s owner Justin Crowther is: maybe, but probably not. “At this time, I’m not really concerned, considering our size, but it’s too early to know for sure,” he wrote in an email. He explained that, of the two main lacquer cutting engineers used by the plant, one sources exclusively through MDC Master Lacquers, a Japanese company. Crowther says they are taking orders as normal for the time being…

Redditch, UK | Happy birthday to ya! Vintage Trax to host day of music and much more: Redditch retro record shop Vintage Trax is celebrating its fifth anniversary this weekend – and everyone is invited to the party. The independent record shop grew out of two pop-up shops in the Kingfisher Shopping Centre before finding a home on Birchfield Road, Headless Cross near the birthplace of Led Zeppelin drummer and famous son John Bonham. Now customers come from far and wide as well as locally to browse the racks of records and cassettes as well as CDs. “It’s not been an easy year by any means with rising costs and increased competition from record fairs and online sellers but we are holding our own,” said owner Ros Sidaway. “There is no better experience than coming into a record shop and digging through the crates of albums and trays of 45s, and finding something you’ve been searching for.”

Ashville, NC | TODAY: A benefit event for Australia held at Static Age Records: “The art show starts at 7 p.m. At 9:30 p.m., performances from local bands will start. The line-up includes Moves, Daddy’s Credit card, 13ag H3ad, and Mouth Breathers. All of these bands are local and coming out to support the cause. Owner of Static Age Records, Jessie McSwane opened his store 12 years ago, events like these happen often at his store. “It seems like every few months we have some type of benefit event going on,” McSwane said. He is excited about this upcoming event and hopes that students and locals come and participate… Static age is first and foremost a record store. In recent years, the store has expanded to musical events and art events. Static Age has about 20 to 25 shows a month, the charitable work associated with the benefit was something McSwane was interested in. He hopes this event helps bring attention to the foundation itself as well as the cause.“It seemed like an organization we could get behind,” McSwane said. While the owner of Static Age often hosts events such as this, to him it’s only the beginning.

The New Rules of Music Snobbery: Hulu’s High Fidelity reboot captures the end of elitist condescension and the rise of fervent eclecticism. …A less perceptive reboot would simply have made Ed Sheeran the new sentimental, tacky crap, but Hulu has gone beyond grafting contemporary references onto Hornby’s tale of 30-somethings who are more adept at sequencing mixtapes than at maintaining healthy relationships. The series captures a fundamental reorientation in listening these days: Elitist condescension about musical preferences isn’t cool anymore, but maybe—die-hard fans fear—obsessing and connecting over music are no longer cool either. Barry-types once used their taste to prop themselves above the less erudite, mainstream-minded listeners they mocked. Cherise, by contrast, just wants to chat about a song—and the consumer, cozy in a private digital bubble, decidedly does not.

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The TVD Storefront

We’re closed.

We’ve closed up the shop for the President’s Day holiday. While we’re away, why not fire up our free Record Store Locator app and visit one of your local indie record stores?

Perhaps there’s an interview, review, or feature you might have missed? Catch up and we’ll see you back here tomorrow, 2/18.

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TVD Los Angeles

The Best of The Idelic Hour with Jon Sidel

Greetings from Laurel Canyon!

Snow started falling, / I could hear the angel calling / We rolled on the ground, he stretched out his wings. / The boy flew away and he started to sing. / He sang, “Break it up, oh, I don’t understand. / Break it up, I can’t comprehend. / Break it up, oh, I want to feel you. / Break it up, don’t look at me.

The sky was raging, the boy disappeared, / I fell on my knee / Atmosphere broke up, the boy reappeared. / I cried, “Take me please!”

Good Friday—yep, that’s where we’re at. Being what I call a “Schmohawk” (a smart mix of Jewish and spiritual Native American Indian) what the fuck do I know?” So, today is good. OK…I will try and make that happen. Why not? It’s spring break for the kids in Canyon, so I’ll give myself a break too.

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TVD Los Angeles

TVD Live Shots: 2020
One Love Cali Reggae Fest, Day 1 at Queen
Mary Park, 2/7

LONG BEACH, CA | It’s no surprise that One Love Cali Reggae Fest has become one of the premier reggae festivals in the US. Since their early days at The Observatory OC in Santa Ana, this festival has gotten bigger and better every year since its inception back in 2015 with no signs of slowing down any time soon. Situated gracefully under the watchful eye of The Queen Mary in beautiful Long Beach, One Love continues to attract reggae’s best and brightest and this year’s event was no exception. Legendary bands such as Dirty Heads, Rebelution, and Slightly Stoopid headlined a three-day event for the ages that left die-hard fans wanting more.

Having been to countless festivals over the years, its important to know right out of the gate that One Love Cali Fest is different from most of the large-scale events one might attend. Upon entering the park, you are immediately immersed with a reggae vibe that feels different. Flanked by three stages, guests can leisurely wander back and forth to catch their favorite bands or better yet take in new ones they’ve never heard before.

The atmosphere at One Love is completely chill and absent of the pretentiousness that accompanies many of the cookie-cutter music festivals crisscrossing the US these days. I met more insanely cool people in one afternoon that I had at the last 10 concerts I had covered and I’m probably being generous.

In addition to beautiful weather and an out-of-this-world vibe, Friday’s line up was second to none and the one I circled on my calendar when the festival was first announced back in November. Unfortunately for me, there were 25 insane acts performing that day across three stages (SMKFLWR., Roots & Culture, and the Tiki Stage) and I’d have to choose which ones I’d be watching (as there was no real way to cover them all).

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The TVD Storefront

TVD Radar: Double Talkin’ Jive: True Rock
’n’ Roll Stories
by Matt Sorum in stores 4/7

VIA PRESS RELEASE | Few musical groups embody the style, sound and spirit of their genre the way Guns N’ Roses embodies rock ’n’ roll. And few musicians have lived a rock ’n’ roll life as full and storied as drummer Matt Sorum’s.

In Double Talkin’ Jive: True Rock ’n’ Roll Stories from the Drummer of Guns N’ Roses, the Cult, and Velvet Revolver (Chicago Review Press, April 7, 2020), legendary drummer Matt Sorum takes music lovers behind the scenes of a remarkable life in rock. Sorum, whose albums have sold tens of millions of copies around the world, provides an honest, engaging account of the highs and lows of superstardom. Along with co-authors Leif Eriksson and Martin Svensson, Sorum recounts his childhood years idolizing Ringo Starr and surviving an abusive stepfather. After leaving high school, Sorum sold pot to get by. Over time, his drug dealing escalated to smuggling large quantities of cocaine, a career that came to a halt following a dramatic shootout.

Sorum fled his old life and settled in Hollywood, where he’d enjoy a rapid ascension to rock ’n’ roll immortality. He caught his big break drumming for the Cult, and only a year later replaced Steven Adler as a member of Guns N’ Roses, with whom he’d record two of rock’s most iconic albums: Use Your Illusion 1 and 2.

Sorum opens up with forthright honesty, sharing never before published anecdotes from his time touring the globe, battling drug and alcohol addiction and navigating volatile relationships with Axl Rose, Slash and the rest of the GNR team. His career with the Cult, Guns N’ Roses, Velvet Revolver, Motörhead, the Hollywood Vampires and Kings of Chaos co-stars an ensemble of rock royalty, from Gene Simmons and Billy Idol to Steven Tyler and Alice Cooper.

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The TVD Storefront

TVD Radar: Ryuichi Sakamoto, The Staggering Girl OST
in stores today

VIA PRESS RELEASE | Milan Records announces the February 14 release of The Staggering Girl (OST) with music by Academy Award-, Golden Globe-, and Grammy-Award winning composer and musician Ryuichi Sakamoto. The album features music from the Luca Guadagnino-directed (Suspiria) short film, which was produced in collaboration with Valentino’s creative director Pierpaolo Piccioli and showcases the fashion house’s couture designs.

Of the soundtrack, composer Ryuichi Sakamoto says, “When approaching the score for The Staggering Girl, I wanted to incorporate the tactile sound of Valentino’s fabrics. So I asked them to send me some samples and utilizing special sensitive microphones, I experimented ‘playing’ the fabrics. I love the sound and how it forces one’s attention to a sound all around us, yet almost entirely ignored.” Having made its debut at Cannes Film Festival last year, The Staggering Girl will be available to watch exclusively on the curated streaming service MUBI starting this Saturday, February 15th. Following the title track “The Staggering Girl”, today Sakamoto shares “Dance – Ambient Version” from the score via IndieWire.

As one-third of Yellow Magic Orchestra and an Academy Award-winning composer for his work on the soundtrack for The Last Emperor, synth pop innovator Ryuichi Sakamoto is among the most groundbreaking artists to have emerged since the late ’70s. A musician’s musician, Ryuichi Sakamoto has created intriguing musical unions with artists such as David Sylvian, Iggy Pop, Tony Williams, Bootsy Collins, Jaques Morelenbaum and many others. He recently re-released the 20th Anniversary Edition of his seminal BTTB last year, as well as the acclaimed full length album Async in 2017.

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The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve;
Black Sabbath,
Sabbath Bloody
Sabbath

Dear Satan,

I’ve always considered you a cool guy. Lord of the Flies, Leader of the Loyal Opposition, natty dresser, boogie man of little kids and grown Puritans alike–even your horns are badass.

So why, if you don’t mind my asking, did you appoint Ozzy Osbourne your ambassador to our world of sin? I would have thought you’d do better than a drug-addled, ant-snorting, famous-for-biting-the-heads-off-small-animals shlub in tragically ill-fitting leather pants. Had you come to me for advice, dear Lucifer, I’d have recommended someone more appropriate–Jimmy Page say, or Maroon 5.

Of course it’s possible Ozzy swiped your title without your permission. Plenty of people have done so over the years, Mick Jagger included, and maybe you figured if you’re gonna cut milksop Mick a break you might as well give poor witless Ozzy a pass too.

Or–and I’m working on this assumption–you’ve let Oz get away with it because Black Sabbath is quite arguably the first and heaviest heavy metal band to ever ooze its way out of the Underworld. What’s more, they scare the shit out of lotsa people, most of ‘em parents, music critics and hippies. You must love putting the frighteners on hippies–all that peace and love shit’s enough to make you puke hellfire.

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  • SUPPORTING YOUR LOCAL INDIE SHOPS SINCE 2007


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