In rotation: 11/29/16

Buy Dennis Hopper’s Personal Record Collection for $150,000, Actor’s copies of classic LPs, one-of-a-kind seven-inch of Carl Perkins’ “Blue Suede Shoes” offered by Hopper’s daughter: Attention (wealthy) Blue Velvet fans: Dennis Hopper’s personal, 110-LP record collection, stocked with the late actor’s copies of classic LPs alongside rare and unreleased recordings, is available to purchase via Moda Operandi for $150,000, or roughly half the budget of Easy Rider. The collection, offered up by Hopper’s daughter Marin, features “handwritten notes to the actor from various artists and several unreleased records, this is a very personal biography of Dennis Hopper’s musical journey…”

Local vinyl guru enjoys success selling records: Region Records owner 24-year-old Josh Becerra reaches success with a business selling his life’s passion — vinyl albums. The humble Becerra is a throwback to a time when the music industry was very different and fans raced to record stores to pick up new albums and load them up on their turntables for hours of listening…Region Records, 208 Main St. in Griffith, recently moved two storefronts west of its previous site and is still a draw to music lovers.

Vinyl Destination: Why are so many record shops opening on this one Melbourne street? Something special is happening on Johnston Street in Fitzroy, Collingwood and Abbotsford. Over the past two years, eight new record stores have opened on or near the thoroughfare. The three suburbs now host 13 vinyl shops between them, packing everything from jazz to punk; bluegrass to techno. Unlike some of their predecessors in the area, none of these shops were opened on the cheap. Most have well-equipped listening stations, spotless display racks, and in some cases, outrageously pricey machines for cleaning and/or straightening old records. It’s clear: these newcomers are confident they’ll be around for many years to come.

Miami’s Newest Record Store Is a Dream Come True for One Local: Miami’s newest record store — in spite of its name — is proud to be from the 305. “I was raised in Allapattah,” Diane Perez, owner of Brooklyn Vintage & Vinyl, explains, “but my girlfriend was born in Brooklyn, and we always liked it there.” Brooklyn Vintage & Vinyl currently has about 5,000 records in its inventory. The store has space to house up to 9,000 records, but Perez isn’t quite ready for that volume yet. “I’m still bringing records in…”

Invisible City to open record store in Toronto: From Italian cosmic belters to Trinidadian disco curiosities to Zambian jam-rockers, Brandon Hocura and Gary Abugan have been rewriting the history books with their essential reissue imprint. Now the Canadian duo, who also run an online shop, have announced they will open an Invisible City brick-and-mortar record store in Toronto. Located on Geary Avenue, an industrial and creative strip in the north east of the city, the new store promises bins of new and used records, and in-store only vinyl exclusives. “We’ll hook up the UREI and play some music until every record is sold,” they say on Facebook.

Ron’s Collectibles promises a trip down memory lane: For about four decades, Morinville resident, Ron Cust, has been collecting and searching out pieces of days gone past, reminders of important times or people in his life. In fact, his impressive collection had grown so big; it came to a point where he needed to make some important decisions on what to do with it all. After some soul searching and talking with his good friend, Paul Smith, what he came up with is now one of Morinville’s newest stores—Ron’s Collectibles.

Analog Vault brings back vinyl tradition, NewBo record store opened by four vinyl enthusiasts: CEDAR RAPIDS — Honoring the tradition of independent record stores, four Cedar Rapids vinyl enthusiasts opened their own last month in the New Bo District neighborhood. Analog Vault is owned and operated by four friends — Molly Breslin, Jim Glass, Chris Morris and Jeremy Vega. “We’re vinyl enthusiasts. This is a chance to talk to people about something we’re enthusiastic about,” Vega said. The record store has been open about a month, and Vega said he’s aware of the challenges they may face.

Columbia record factory in Santa Maria used to produce 100,000 albums a day: Columbia Records used to have a giant manufacturing plant next to Highway 101 in Santa Maria, now the Costco Power Shopping Center. With the invention of the phonograph in the early 20th century, music became a commodity sold by units. Though an occasional hipster still buys vinyl records, the high-profit, high-volume recording industry has imploded as consumption has moved from plastic platters to CDs to digital downloads to streaming.

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  • SUPPORTING YOUR LOCAL INDIE SHOPS SINCE 2007


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