In rotation: 9/16/22

Exclusives Announced Ahead of Record Store Day: Releases from the Doors, Fleetwood Mac, David Bowie, Duran Duran, Motorhead, Ringo Starr, Captain Beefheart and the Cure highlight the classic rock lineup for Record Store Day’s 2022 Black Friday event, set for Nov. 25. Keith Richards, Brian Wilson, the Grateful Dead, Jefferson Airplane, Bryan Ferry, Iggy Pop, Joe Strummer, Motley Crue, Dee Snider and Red Hot Chili Peppers also appear on our partial list, which you can check out below. Fleetwood Mac’s The Alternate Collection box set, available on both colored vinyl and CD, features rare alternate recordings from 1975 to 1987. Bowie’s The Next Day Extra EP includes previously issued outtakes and remixes from the late singer’s 2013 LP, The Next Day. Duran Duran’s Live at Hammersmith ’82, pressed on gold double vinyl, documents one of the band’s three shows that year at London’s Hammersmith Odeon.

The world’s first vinyl album that’s also a guitar pedal has been launched: Skin Walker, the new album from Indianapolis garage rockers Brother O Brother, is unlike any other album released, ever. ndianapolis garage rock thrashers Brother O Brother have announced that their new album Skin Walker will be released as a guitar pedal. And if that doesn’t make any sense at all, it’s exactly as it sounds: it’s a vinyl record, and it’s also a guitar pedal. This unholy innovation comes from pioneering vinyl experimentalists Romanus Records, who have something of track record where it comes taking the humble long-player places it’s never been before. Romanus filled one LP with razor blades and gunpowder, embedded LEDs in another, and even worked on a limited edition “liquid-filled snowglobe variant” vinyl edition of the soundtrack of the Bill Murray comedy Scrooged. Skin Walker will be released as a pair of vinyl LPs, each considerably thickened to house the pedal electronics, with the control knobs positioned on the centre labels. One pedal will offer overdrive/boost, and feature a toggle switch to control two different channels, while the other is a delay pedal, with four settings to create unique combinations of delay.

Caracas, VE | Venezuelan music lovers also starting to ride vinyl wave: Fernando Dominguez, part of a small but growing number of music aficionados in Venezuela with a newfound interest in vinyl records, browses the shelves of the recently opened El Marchante record store one late afternoon in this capital. A big fan of rock-and-roll and North American and British music, he has found in LPs a new way to listen to his favorite recording artists. “I really don’t have a vinyl collection, but this retro wave is appealing,” Dominguez told Efe while holding one of Canadian rock band Rush’s albums. “There wasn’t much variety before, nowhere to pick out (records) and now it’s different. I think if I’m not a collector (yet), I’m going to become one.” His friend, Jose Lombardo, has a collection of around 1,500 LPs at home and will likely expand it with the opening of this new store for music lovers.

The vinyl industry is a mess — and this British company thinks it has the tech to fix it: ElasticStage believes it has the special sauce, but we’re waiting for that patent to drop. …Well, elasticStage is a British company co-founded by two Austrians: Steve Rhodes and Werner Freistaetter. Each of them have worked in the music industry as recording artists and behind the boards. The pair teamed up six years ago to create a machine they claim is the world’s first “on-demand” manufacturer of vinyl. This isn’t Freistaetter’s first foray into this field of one-off record production either, as he founded Vinyl Carvers in 2002, a company that allows people to create a single vinyl disc. Rhodes and Freistaetter started elasticStage to take this idea further. While Vinyl Carvers targets DJs and people who want one or two songs on a disc, elasticStage wants to alter the entire sector.

The Best Record Players and Turntables for Every Kind of Audiophile: Needle drop like a bona fide DJ. In case you hadn’t heard, vinyl is having a moment. Record sales were up 27% last year, and if you yourself are searching for the best record players to enjoy your new stack of LPs, we’ve got you covered. But first, what is it about vinyl that has everyone rediscovering record stores again? For Francis Harris, co-founder and musical director of Public Records in Brooklyn, New York, it’s less about sound quality (Harris champions CD as a “superior format”) than it is about a “greater appreciation of the art form and the labor that goes into making a record.” And while a CD player is great and all, listening to analog playback, rather than digital, allows users to hear music as the artist intended.

7 Vinyl Record Storage Ideas: Vinyl records are a throwback to an earlier time in music history, with the very first released in 1931. The first vinyl record was 12 inches and made of polyvinyl chloride or PVC. If you have an impressive collection of vinyl records and need to store them safely, good news! Below we have a list of 7 vinyl record storage ideas that will help you do exactly that! Read on to ensure your collection of vinyl tunes stays pristine in storage.

Watch Neil Young track down his own bootlegs in rare footage of a record store confrontation: It’s a great mystery of the world to muse over how many masterpieces have simply been lost or otherwise precluded from seeing the light of day by tragic mishaps. Bob Dylan used to leave song sheets lying around behind the back of the piano or in basements, Tom Waits reportedly had tapes robbed from his car, and Neil Young picks up his own forgotten bootlegs in a record store. And Young wasn’t all too happy about that. “It’s not a good record,” Young tells a shopkeeper with an illegal bootleg in hand, “What about the artists who make the record?” Things then divulge into comedy as Young informs the effacing clerk, “I’m one of the people on this record and I don’t recognise this record.” And quick as a flash, he puts things brilliantly into perspective by replying, “I don’t know, I don’t listen to records. I can’t afford a record player so that’s it.”

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