A morning mix of news for the vinyl inclined

In rotation: 9/8/21

The best record players for every listening style: Most music fans can agree on one thing: Some music just sounds better on vinyl. In fact, this is a large part of why record players have not disappeared, even as music has gone more digital. If anything, sales of turntables have gone up since 2010, with over 75 thousand sold in the US in 2020. Of course, record players aren’t just popular with audiophiles willing to spend hundreds (or thousands) of dollars on a luxury record player. They’re popular with college students, homeowners looking for a classy accessory for their living room, and mixmasters. As a result, there are a variety of different record players available on the market — and a whole range of prices, with some costing thousands of dollars. But, unless you’re a pro DJ or true audiophile, you don’t need to spend an arm and a leg to find one that delivers quality sound.

Technics announces new turntable, SL-1210G: Audiophile capabilities with DJ-inspired aesthetics – in a new sleek black finish. Technics is releasing a new version of its SL-1210G turntable, this October. A twin sister to its SL-1210GAE limited edition turntable, the SL-1210G incorporates audiophile level technology in a range that sits below its Reference class. …“We learned from the huge success of the limited edition SL-1210GAE, which was launched in June 2020 and almost immediately sold out,” says European Technics Product Manager Frank Balzuweit. “We realised there was high demand for a ‘regular’ black version of this flagship 1200 Series model. In its striking black finish, the new SL-1210G possesses genuine elegance.” Retailing for £3499, the SL-1210-G will be available in Europe from October 2021.

Looking to modernize your vinyl collection? Here are some digital options for your records: “…The revival of vinyl records has been growing in popularity for over a decade, which has prompted many companies to create new turntables that can connect to a computer. Making sure it has a USB interface isn’t the only thing to consider because the cost of new vinyl records can be two to three times that of the comparable CD or digital download. Vinyl records suffer from an affliction that doesn’t apply to its digital counterparts – they slowly deteriorate with each play and buying a cheap turntable can accelerate the degradation. The “needle” of a turntable rides in the grooves of the record and the mechanics that control this physical contact will have a huge impact on the health of your vinyl over the years.

Are vinyl records and custom t-shirts a good bundle idea for indie bands? …Aside from the fact that it has tons of fans from both old and new generations of music lovers, there are other more technical reasons why you should release your very own custom vinyl records. The format is known for the great sound quality it offers to its listeners. It also helps musicians deliver their songs in the nearest possible sound they want. However, these vinyl records should really be well taken care of. It’s a very impressionable physical format which means that external factors like dust and heat can damage the record and the sound it produces. Between digital and physical albums, physical albums are much more superior in terms of visual creativity since it does not only give a cover album space. But among the different physical album formats, the winner for this category would be the vinyl record.

Best Outer Record Sleeves for Maximum Protection: A crisp, brand new record straight off the production line is a beauty to behold. Untouched by the outside world, your new record arrives spotless and ready to provide years, decades, possibly generations of joy. Vinyl really is the best format for experiencing the album as an art form. But there’s a problem… As soon as we begin enjoying our new record, the signs of wear start to appear. Constant use, pulling the record in and out of storage, perusing the liner notes, and eventually sliding the record back afterward can quickly take its toll. Scuffed edges, ring wear, and scratches are all signs of outer record jacket wear we want to avoid if our investment is to stand the test of time. Nobody likes a dog-eared record. Inner sleeves protect the vinyl record, but if we want to preserve the artwork, we also want to invest in the best outer record sleeves. For recommendations on the best inner sleeves, check out our previous article. Today, we’ll list our personal recommendations of the best outer record sleeves to help preserve your album for many years to come.

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TVD Los Angeles

TVD Live Shots: Megadeth, Lamb of
God, Trivium, and Hatebreed at FivePoint Amphitheater, 9/1

The Metal Tour of the Year featuring Megadeth, Lamb of God, Trivium, and Hatebreed was one of the most incredible shows I have been to in the past five years (and I’ve been to plenty). The lineup was a ferocious blend of new and old metal that left nothing to the imagination at a sold out FivePoint Amphitheater in Irvine, CA.  Based on the way each band played, you never would have guessed that most were on a Covid induced hiatus for the better part of two years.  Each left it all on stage for the thousands in attendance and ultimately scorched the earth beneath them when the dust finally settled on Wednesday evening.

I don’t know about you, but I had The Metal Tour of the Year circled on my calendar for quite some time.  As the date approached, I started see other bands cancelling tours and hoped that would not be the case for Five Point’s first true metal show of the year.

Although huge fans of Megadeth, Lamb of God, Trivium, and Hatebreed, I’d never had the chance to catch any of them live and knew this might be my only chance to catch them together on one killer bill. Luckily for me (and the thousands of rabid fans just like me), the Metal Gods ultimately came through and Wednesday’s metal extravaganza went off without a hitch on a spectacular night under the stars.

Taking the 6PM slot and first up on stage was Bridgeport, Connecticut’s very own, Hatebreed. Jamey Jasta and Company immediately launched into an 11-song set that was pure adrenaline and then some. For me, the highlight of their set was a killer rendition of Slayer’s “Ghosts of War” along with two of my favorites, “Last Breath” and “I Will Be Heard.” Such a good band and one worthy of major metal respect.

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The TVD Storefront

Demand it on Vinyl:
The Jazz Butcher, Dr Cholmondley Repents:
A-Sides, B-Sides and Seasides
4CD bookback in stores 11/12

VIA PRESS RELEASE | “I got a strange view of the world from ‘60s kids TV because anarchists and drug addicts ran it,” says Pat Fish AKA The Jazz Butcher as explanation for his slew of albums, singles and EPs that emerged between 1983 and 1995, a mere 12 years of madcap creativity part of an ongoing foray into the business of show.

Thankfully, the weirdest moments are placed next to the most commercially-accessible tunes—end to end—on Dr Cholmondley Repents, a new collection named after an imaginary Butcher album hallucinated by Melody Maker’s Mick Mercer back in the day.

Dr Cholmondley Repents gathers single A-sides; the contenders, the would-be radio sweethearts and indie chart toppers; along with witty and whimsical B-sides, tangential 12-inch strums (the C-sides) and an excellent session for celebrated Los Angeles radio station KCRW from 1989 (Seasides – geddit?).

The collection is littered with many a pop culture-assaulting observation; the cast includes Dracula, Gaddafi, drunks, tigers, Herbert Lom movies, various book titles transformed into a chorus, Arding And Hobbs’ department store, doctor crocodile, the prime minister, the Moors murderers, and many more.

No subject matter is refused, it’s played out by four generations of Butchers that included a couple of Bauhaus escapees and some Woodentops among others. “Pat is positively Wildean!” attested part-time Butcher David J.

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The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve:
The Pretenders,
Learning to Crawl

Celebrating Chrissie Hynde on her 70th.Ed.

A couple of days ago, I found myself doing something I haven’t done (no exaggeration) in years: dancing. I dervished about the apartment all by myself, like a lunatic, with the cat looking on from the safety of the bed, wide-eyed with eminent peril. I could tell the poor puss was thinking, “What the devil is he doing?” So I cried, “Listening to The Pretenders, you hairy little fool! And dancing!”

I would not call The Pretenders a great band, per se. A very, very good band, sure. Chrissie Hynde is an excellent songwriter, and has one of the most distinctive voices in rock. Unfortunately, like Badfinger, The Pretenders are just as famous for their tragically high mortality rate as they are for their music. During the 2-year hiatus between 1981’s Pretenders II and 1983’s Learning to Crawl, Hynde saw two band mates, guitarist James Honeyman-Scott and bassist Pete Farndon, die drug-related deaths. Technically Farndon was no longer a Pretender—Hynde fired him shortly before he died—but still. To paraphrase Oscar Wilde on the subject of orphans, to lose one band member is bad luck—to lose two, sheer carelessness.

Hynde, an Akron, Ohio native, formed The Pretenders in 1978 in London, England, where she was working as a journo for NME and at SEX, the legendary fashion boutique of Malcolm McLaren and Vivienne Westwood. She received a record contract on the strength of a demo recorded with a three-piece band including Phil Taylor of Motörhead, then hired a permanent group including Honeyman-Scott, Farndon, and drummer Martin Chambers.

The Pretenders’ first two albums included several hits; unfortunately, while the band was making its bones musically, it members were dropping like flies. By 1983’s Learning to Crawl 50 percent of the original group was dead, leaving just Hynde (lead vocals, rhythm guitar, and harmonica) and Chambers. But rather than throwing in the towel, Hynde hired Robbie McIntosh on lead guitar and backing vocals and Malcolm Foster on bass and backing vocals.

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TVD UK

UK Artist of the Week: Zed The Dreamer

Immerse yourselves in Zed The Dreamer and his smooth, sultry new single “Comfort (Not Love),” out now.

With a voice like velvet, Zed The Dreamer—aka Zé Pedro Viveiros—certainly proves he’s one to watch and we’re loving his low-key vibe. Zed’s latest single “Comfort (Not Love)” is taken from his EP “The Life and Death of McKenzie Kane,” which is also out now, and it’s made us feel all warm and fuzzy inside.

Channeling the nu-jazz stylings of Tom Misch whilst bringing in the brooding sultry elements of the likes of Gus Dapperton, Zed isn’t messing around. “Comfort (Not Love)” is the perfect fusion of indie, soul, and jazz—and we can’t get enough.

Zed moved from studying in Portugal to London in 2019 and he hasn’t looked back since.

“Comfort (Not Love)” is in stores now.

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The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve:
Sloks,
A knife in your hand

Based in Turin, Italy, the trio Sloks specialize in garage punk, raw and aggressive, with their second full-length A knife in your hand dishing out a formidable stream of primo bash and squall. Ivy Claudy handles the vocals and the pummeling of a floor tom, Tony Machete pounds on a larger drum set, and Billy Fuzz rakes the guitar strings. Although a wide-ranging style doesn’t seem to be high on their list of priorities, the record’s 11 tracks offer enough twists to keep matters fresh for the duration, and while they’re consistently focused on dark themes, it’s an angle that avoids faltering into schtick. The album is out now on black or red vinyl, CD and digital through Voodoo Rhythm Records.  

Sloks debuted with a 4-song 7-inch in 2017 and followed it up the next year with the full-length Holy Motor. Those releases effectively established an approach that hasn’t wavered. Upon cueing up A knife in your hand, the unkempt griminess of their sound becomes apparent in mere seconds. If surely connected to the more destructive regions of the garage impulse, Sloks are just as tethered to what’s been called weird punk. Bluntly, the band’s sound is damaged in the best way possible.

Think Flipper, think Chrome, think Tales of Terror, and think of the dozens of bands that fall into the Killed by Death subcategory of late ’70s-early ’80s punk rock (like “UFO Dictator” by fellow Italians Tampax and “Cola Freaks” by the Danish band Lost Kids. But Sloks’ twistedness is distinguished by a trashy-pulpy aura that’s intensified with a borderline transgressive edge, perhaps reminiscent of the rawest low-budget drive-in flicks of the ’70s and the video nasties of the decade following.

Indeed, a few of the tracks register like soundtracks to montages of cinematic mass slaughter (chainsaw massacres and toolbox murders), and it’s directly due to the voice of Claudy, who is credited not with vocals but screams. But the album’s opener “Dillinger” is more of a scuzzy distorto-pulser with the vocals a distant croak.

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A morning mix of news for the vinyl inclined

In rotation: 9/7/21

Victoria, BC | Lyle’s Place record store, a pillar of the Victoria music scene, to close after 40 years: Store that fostered friendships and community announced on Facebook it would be closing this fall. It’s the end of an era for the music scene in Victoria. Lyle’s Place, a beloved record store in the city’s downtown core, is closing its doors this fall after nearly 40 years in business. The shop on Yates Street announced the closure on social media, prompting dozens of customers from all over Canada to share their stories and express their sadness over the news. “So sad, spent a lot of my teen years going to that place,” wrote one follower. “I worked at Lyle’s Place around 97-98. Great memories working the buying table and going next door to buy chips for everyone,” wrote another. Janice Lyle, who runs the store with her husband Rod, told CHEK News, simply, “it’s time.”

Collingwood, ON | Keeping it vinyl: Mad Dog’s in Collingwood known for diverse selection of records: Shop sells everything from ABBA to Frank Zappa. More than three decades in the music business and Bob Madigan can still be shocked by the world of rock. The day after Rolling Stones drummer Charlie Watts died at the age of 80, Madigan was amazed by the longevity of two of the group’s other members, Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, both of whom have a history of drug abuse. “How he’s dead and those other two survived, friggin’ kills me,” he said while sitting in Mad Dog’s Coffee and Vinyl Café on Hurontario Street. Madigan opened Mad Dog’s in 1991 during the CD revolution, but slid into vinyl after a trip to the U.K. in 1996. He said he sells everything ABBA to Frank Zappa. The big record companies are still producing vinyl albums, and now he’s known for his diverse selection and ability to track down albums for his customers, who are mostly women in their mid-30s.

Northamptonshire, UK | Visual Vinyl excites record fans with Daventry high street debut: Good news for music lovers in the town! A new record store has opened in Daventry high street. Visual Vinyl, a chain of record shops which hopes to nurture and celebrate the love of physical music in the streaming era has now come to the Northants town. Store owner Andy Johnson spoke to us after the grand opening. “Well obviously, we were really happy with the opening and we’re excited for more people in Daventry to see what we’re about,” Andy said. “We have several locations already across the East Midlands, but we really saw an opportunity in the town to provide a little bit of something that was missing on the high street.” Visual Vinyl has set up shop inside a bigger new shop called Emporio Amanda, and together hope to breathe more life into a high street which is visited by shoppers from all over the county.

Durango, CO | Vinyl revival: After three-year void, Durango now has a new record shop. It seems to me, that as of late, I’ve been complaining an inordinate amount. If you’ve been on the receiving end, I’m truly, mostly, sorry. It isn’t on purpose, and it certainly is not confined to a single topic. That said, it does tend to circle back toward the drastically shifting dynamics in the (no longer) sleepy southwestern town I’ve somewhat surprisingly called home for nearly 20 years. One of the many tendrils of frustration (along with the complete and utter absurdity surrounding the real estate market, local wage inequity and the incommensurate cost of living, the current maddening state of the pandemic, traveler vs. tourist, and on and on and on) was the absence of a real, proper brick-and-mortar record store. On July 14, 2018, Robert Stapleton and co. shuttered the doors on our beloved Southwest Sound, which had been more than a record store in Durango since 1977.

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The TVD Storefront

We’re closed.

We’ve closed TVD’s HQ for the Labor Day holiday. While we’re away, why not fire up our Record Store Locator app and visit one of your local indie record stores?

Perhaps there’s an interview, review, or feature you might have missed? Catch up and we’ll see you back here tomorrow.

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TVD Los Angeles

TVD’s The Idelic Hour with Jon Sidel

Greetings from Laurel Canyon!

If we tell you that you’ve got two days to live / Then don’t complain, ’cause that’s one more than you’d get in Zaire / So don’t hang around and be foolish / Do something constructive with your weekend

From Monday morning I work for Friday nights / Collect my wages, then try to paint on the smell of soap / ‘Cause tonight I get ready early / Score what I need and go pick a girl up

It seems like ages since we had some fun / Here comes the weekend – I get to see the girls / Long live the weekend, the weekend is here

Labor Day weekend has always had a strange aura. My “internal time-clock” seems to have set itself at childhood.

My parents would send us to the “beach” for the summer. Careless days of slow summer fun would start the weekend and quickly fade before returning to the dirty humanity of a hot city. Dark, cooler evenings and the excitement of a new chapter. Possibilities permeate the air.

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The TVD Storefront

TVD Radar: Pink Floyd,
A Momentary Lapse Of Reason–Remixed & Updated in stores 10/29

VIA PRESS RELEASE | Sony Music announced today that Pink Floyd’s A Momentary Lapse Of Reason – Remixed & Updated, will be released on Friday, October 29, 2021. Pre order HERE.

Remixed and updated from the original 1987 master tapes for The Later Years by Andy Jackson with David Gilmour, assisted by Damon Iddins, the album will be available on vinyl, CD, DVD, Blu-ray and digitally with Stereo and 5.1 mixes. In addition, for the first time, the album will be presented in 360 Reality Audio, a new immersive music experience that closely mimics the omni-directional soundscape of live musical performance for the listener using Sony’s object-based 360 Spatial Sound technologies. A Momentary Lapse Of Reason will also be released in Dolby Audio and UHD in addition to 360 Reality Audio, all of which will continue with other Pink Floyd releases.

The release of The Later Years project in 2019 gave an opportunity for a fresh overview of the A Momentary Lapse Of Reason album, originally released in 1987. By returning to some of Richard Wright’s original keyboard takes, and by re-recording new drum tracks with Nick Mason, producers David Gilmour and Bob Ezrin have restored a better creative balance between the three Pink Floyd members.

David Gilmour: “Some years after we had recorded the album, we came to the conclusion that we should update it to make it more timeless, featuring more of the traditional instruments that we liked and that we were more used to playing. This was something we thought it would benefit from. We also looked for and found some previously unused keyboard parts of Rick’s which helped us to come up with a new vibe, a new feeling for the album.”

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The TVD Storefront

Showtime Documentary Reminds Us: He’s Rick James

More than 20 years after his hitmaking heyday, Rick James became a household name to a whole new generation in 2004 when Dave Chappelle mocked his brash personality with the catchphrase “I’m Rick James, bitch!”

The singer was still around and trying to catch a break after drug binges, prison, and record company indifference had sidelined his career. So James played into the lampoon when he appeared on the 2004 BET Awards with what was supposed to be a comeback performance, declaring the catchphrase anew as if to make it his own. He’d be dead two months later.

The phrase repeats in the title of the compelling new documentary on the musician’s career, Bitchin’: The Sound and Fury of Rick James, premiering on Showtime tonight, Friday September 3.

It’s surprising that there hasn’t previously been a full film documenting the singer’s remarkable life of ups and downs. Director Sacha Jenkins, who previously directed Wu-Tang Clan: Of Mics and Men, takes on the task with a verve that reflects the artist at hand.

Taking from old interviews and rare live performances, as well as interviews with ex-wives and lovers, his kids, and members of his Stone City Band, it tells a full tale of what was anything but an overnight success story.

Born in Buffalo, James began playing in bands as a teenager. A member of the US Naval Reserves, he fled to Canada when he got called up and fell into a burgeoning Toronto music scene that eventually had him in a band with Neil Young and Bruce Palmer, before they went off to form Buffalo Springfield. Signed to Motown as a rare rock band, we hear the Mynah Birds single (and it’s pretty good) but James was caught for desertion and the band stalled.

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Graded on a Curve: Spooky Tooth,
Spooky Two

Celebrating Mike Harrison, born on this day in 1945.Ed.

Spooky Tooth: I don’t know exactly how to start this review of Spooky Two, except by saying that Spooky Tooth has always, at least in my mind, been in a dead heat with Foghat as funniest band name ever when stoned. For the longest time I didn’t know much more than that about them, other than that they featured Gary Wright, the genius who gave us the great “Dream Weaver,” on organ and vocals. Oh, and they also featured Luther Grosvenor, who would go on to change his name to Ariel Bender and play guitar for Mott the Hoople.

I always suspected them of progressive transgressions, but hey—I was wrong, at least on 1969’s Spooky Two. No neo-classical rigmarole for these guys; some gussied up vocal hoohah, yes, but you never get the idea listening to them that they think they’re slumming by playing rock’n’roll and not Modest Mussorgsky. True, they were keyboard heavy, a frequent indicator of prog proclivities, but both Wright and Mike Harrison utilized their keyboards to rock, not to roll up into a little ball in embarrassment they weren’t Wagner.

I have only one two real reasons to dislike them, the first of which is the guy who sings the high notes in the horribly titled (what a cliché!) heavy metal epic “Evil Woman,” which was written by Larry Weiss, the same guy who gave us the great “Rhinestone Cowboy.” I have never heard anything like those stratospheric vocals, and I will literally pay never to hear them again. They make TV commercial superstar Lil’ Sweet sound like a baritone.

Which is a pity, because the song is a long and cool demonstration both of the band’s keyboards and guitar chops. Oh, and the second reason? The Wright-penned “Lost in My Dream,” a subpar Procol Harum song which evolves from something barely listenable to a pretentious nightmare that builds and builds, with vocals being piled on vocals while the singer goes on about how “somewhere in the frost in the sea of my mind waits my destiny.” Dude, that’s not frost; that’s Foghat! And I don’t know about you, but I fear the Dream Weaver is not far off.

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The TVD Storefront

TVD Radar: Motörhead, Everything Louder Forever 2LP and 4LP in stores 10/29

VIA PRESS RELEASE | Motörhead… a life force, an energy, an attitude and the loudest, meanest, dirtiest music to smash the 20th and 21st centuries. With a bastard sound comprising an unholy synergy of rock, punk and heavy metal, Motörhead comes coated in relentless, ear-curdling power. They were life-changing for millions, carrying a spirit and approach to life and music which proudly said, “Honey, we’re hoo-oome, pour us a drink, because we’re here to enjoy ourselves!” The ‘off’ switch was never employed in the Motörhead lust for life, and they became legends as a result.

Leading the charge for their entire 40 year career, was the cultural icon Ian ‘Lemmy’ Kilmister, who swashbuckled around stages, streets and over seas like a glorious Mad Max pirate truthsayer, roaring for the good and screaming at the wankers. With his propulsive sound and lyrical might leading the charge, Motörhead released twenty-two studio albums over those four decades, amassing chart topping records worldwide, a Grammy award and racking up around 20 million sales. Their hit song, ‘Ace Of Spades’, became Motörhead’s anthem, perfectly capturing their attitude for millions, and punching giant holes in stereos worldwide to this day.

Nothing was harder, nothing was faster, nothing packed more raw attitude and certainly nothing was louder, making Motörhead a cultural elixir that was regularly imbibed across all genre lines. Don’t take our word for it, look around any heavy metal, punk or alternative gig, and you’ll see the indomitable warpig logo and Motörhead gothic script on a t-shirt, a jacket, even an arm or leg or back (Motörhead tattoos are everywhere), all sitting on the bodies of rockers, metalheads, punks, bikers, rebels, outcasts, freethinkers and even athletes all around the world.

Yeah, that’s right, Motörhead’s cultural reach remains virtually peerless to this very day (the one you’re living right now as you read this), and it continues to span fans young and old, igniting their adrenaline and giving them both entertainment and identity.

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Graded on a Curve: Coldplay,
Live in Buenos Aires

All of my closest friends—amongst whose number I count legendary toughwoman champion Shannon Hall, Dutch Heavyweight Boxing Champion Martijn “Vuisten van Staal” de Vries, notorious East End London gangsters Ronnie and Reggie Kray, and Stewie my cat—simply can’t comprehend my love for Coldplay. They think I’m soft. They think I bathe in violets. In short, they hold me in contempt, and aren’t afraid to let me know it. The other day I tried to put A Rush of Blood to the Head on the stereo only to get swatted by Stewie. Did I say swatted? Make that punched in the face.

But I don’t care. So what if Coldplay’s testosterone levels are less than zero? They’ve given us more rousing anthems per square inch of vinyl than Bruce Springsteen. And if you don’t believe me pick up a copy of 2018’s Live in Buenos Aires. Virtually every track is a sing-along aided and abetted by frontman Chris Martin, and that’s the LP’s only drawback—you find yourself wishing the audience would shut its collective trap and let charismatic Coldplay frontman Chris Martin go about his business in peace.

Fortunately, the crowd at the show in Buenos Aires are in perfect sync; they may well be the largest collection of backing vocalists in history, and if they couldn’t hold a tune the album would flat-out unlistenable. Fortunately, Martin doesn’t bring them on stage to sing, although he does hand over lead vocal duties to drummer Will Champion on “In My Place.”

But back to the wimp issue. There’s no denying Coldplay may be the gushiest band in the world. I’m hard pressed to think of a group with a higher romance quotient. It helps to be a blubbering sentimentalist to enjoy their music. Ask a Coldplay fan to name the band’s most romantic song and they’ll invariably reply, “All of them.” What does this say about me? Just that while I pretend to be a callous guy who thinks Killdozer’s “Free Love in Amsterdam” is the epitome of a great love song, in reality I’m a blubbering sentimentalist.

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A morning mix of news for the vinyl inclined

In rotation: 9/3/21

Huntington, WV | Lost Huntington: Davidson’s Record Shop: In the 1950s, rock and roll burst on the nation and revolutionized the music scene. America had never heard anything like it before. Characterized by a heavy beat and simple melodies, it was an amalgam of black rhythm and blues and white country music. While their parents may have hated it, youngsters loved it and flocked to buy rock and roll records. Rock music became the soundtrack of a youthful generation. And young rock fans in Huntington knew the best place to get their hot hands on the latest rock 45s by Chuck Berry, Little Richard, Buddy Holly and, of course, Elvis was Davidson’s Record Shop at 907 4th Ave. The little shop was always busy after school let out each day and on weekends was strictly standing room only.

Warsaw, PL | Elektra – reading room at the Mazowieckie Institute of Culture. Vinyl records, comics, albums: Hundreds of vinyl records, comic books and art albums on the shelves. Next to it there are comfortable armchairs, turntables with headphones, desks on the mezzanine, and stylish posters on the walls. In the renovated building of the Mazowiecki Institute of Culture at Elektoralna Street, a reading room for Elektra words and sounds was created. As the originators themselves say, Elektra is a “temple of analogue culture”, a place that “combines the functions of a literary salon with the atmosphere of an independent record store”. And they were inspired by the collection of records from the library that used to function here. – It turned out that the library also rented vinyl records. We inherited a diverse set of speeches by Lenin or songs in honor of the party, but also Polish jazz, entertainment music such as Skaldowie or Grechuta or Polish poets reciting their poems – said Aleksandar Ćirlić, one of the hosts of the new space, during the meeting with journalists.

Amsterdam, NL | Rush Hour hosting five-day used record sale: With thousands of records for less than a fiver. Amsterdam’s Rush Hour is hosting a five-day record sale, this September. While Rush Hour originally planned to host the sale over just one day, the five day event will see 1000s of records on sale, with new additions being added each day. Record prices are also a steal, with all records being sold for €3 each — equivalent to £2.50. “Too much stuff that needs to go out. We are cleaning the basement!” The sale will be held from the 8th September to the 12th, from 11am-6pm.

12 Soundtracks You Need to Hear on Vinyl: Despite the convenience of digital technology, an increasing number of music fans are turning to – or returning to, as the case may be – vinyl as their preferred method of listening to and purchasing albums. As Variety recently reported, vinyl sales soared nearly 30% in the U.S. last year, outpacing CDs for the first time since the mid-80s, and the movie soundtrack genre has benefitted greatly from that unlikely resurgence. Adding fuel to this comeback story are a number of specialty labels, like Waxwork Records and Mondo’s Death Waltz Recording Company, that cater specifically to film buffs and soundtrack collectors. And that’s understandable when you consider the many practical and aesthetic similarities between vinyl and traditional 35mm film. After all, both are analog formats, beloved for the warmth and richness of their sound and image, and both inspire nostalgic feelings based on our formative listening and viewing histories. So if you’re looking to build or expand your own soundtrack collection, here are 12 titles that deserve a spin on your turntable.

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  • SUPPORTING YOUR LOCAL INDIE SHOPS SINCE 2007


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