The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve: Nathan Salsburg,
Third

Louisville, KY’s Nathan Salsburg has no shortage of achievements, but as a musician he’s primarily known for collaborating with Bonnie “Prince” Billy and fellow guitarist James Elkington, recording and touring in the band of singer-songwriter Joan Shelley, and for his own releases, the latest being the first to feature only acoustic guitar. Often, going truly solo details an artist with something to prove or at least intending to make a statement, but while Salsburg’s playing attains a high level early and then stays there, the emphasis is consistently on the beautiful while avoiding the florid or sedate. The contempo guitar renaissance carries on with Third, out July 20 on LP, CD, and digital from No Quarter.

If asked to categorize Nathan Salsburg’s new one, I’d call it an instrumental folk guitar album, which is no great feat of analysis on my part and might not seem like that big of a deal. Describing it as merely folk is perhaps limiting, but it gets to Salsburg’s knowledge and deft integration of tradition and geographical styles; since 2000 he’s worked as part of the Alan Lomax Archive and is currently its curator.

However, even as the animal paintings on Third’s cover suggest the rustic, the LP doesn’t register as a plunge into or expansion of well-established root forms, as throughout he’s closer to Bert Jansch in non-vocal mode than to the American Primitive or anything consciously old-timey. Opener “Timoney’s” does possess an Irish feel, in no small part due to the inspiration of “Timoney’s Ass,” a short story by the noted Irish writer Liam O’Flaherty.

As on his prior releases, “Timoney’s” makes abundantly clear that Salsburg is a master of his instrument, and yet there’s no flash for the sake of it, and likewise, the air of Ireland takes firm hold without getting laid on too thick, which is frankly a hinderance with a lot of neo-Irish stuff. Although the stated influence of UK folk-revival guitarists, amongst them Dick Gaughan and Paul Brady, is a recurring element in the disc’s scheme, foremost is the strength of the songs, with all but two of the ten Salsburg originals.

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A morning mix of news for the vinyl inclined

In rotation: 7/17/18

Vinyl records make a comeback in Chile: A Chilean company is busy bringing vinyl records back to life after they disappeared from this South American country more than 35 years ago. The vinyl record had been a mainstay in this country since 1951 when it made its debut as the great sound invention of modern times in the form of the “LP” or long play record. But vinyl factories ended up being dismantled in 1983, after succumbing to the arrival of the cassette. Since the late 1980s not a single label was interested or even dared to once again manufacture vinyl records in Chile. And like in many other places, vinyl became more of a collector’s item than a go-to choice for music. However, a small group of young people clung tight to this form of musical reproduction…

Vinyl Sales Have Grown 66.6% In Canada This Year Alone — Among Other Huge Gains: When it comes to the music consumption habits of Canada, some interesting trends have emerged during the first half of 2018. In particular, vinyl records enjoyed a surge of 66.6 percent, according to Nielsen’s mid-year report. In 2017, there were 300,000 vinyl LPs sold, but that number jumped to 400,000 vinyl LPs in 2018. Just last week, we reported that sales of vinyl records were up 19.2 percent for the first half of the year in the United States. It’s speculated that as customers look for a “tangible product” instead of CDs, that records are filling that void. And as that demand continues, upgraded vinyl solutions like HD Vinyl are likely to blossom.

‘It’s an antidote to streaming culture’ – meet the people reconnecting with vinyl in Ireland: On Monday, Mark Whelan woke to a lovely message on Facebook. “It was the most intimate experience I think I’ve ever had listening to an album – it truly blew me away.” The note was sent from someone who had been at a vinyl-listening party organised by Whelan and held in Dublin’s Liquor Rooms the night before. The album in question was Pink Floyd’s 1973 classic, The Dark Side of the Moon, and Whelan says a number of people there – the vast majority of them Floyd obsessives – told him afterwards they had heard sonic detail on the album that they hadn’t encountered before.

Hallmark Pacts With WMG To Offer Cards Packaged With Vinyl 45s: This summer, Hallmark is expanding its collection of Vinyl Record Cards with birthday cards featuring songs from Warner Music Group (WMG) artists such as Tina Turner and The Cars. Each card includes a 7-inch vinyl record with two songs from each artist built into a sleeve on the card’s cover. Available in card shops and online at Hallmark.com and Amazon.com, the first in the co-venture program started Valentine’s Day when three were issued featuring songs from Atlantic Records artists Bruno Mars, Aretha Franklin and INXS. The century-old Hallmark Cards company is headquartered in Kansas City, Missouri, employing more than 28,000 worldwide and with revenues of about $4 billion annually.

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TVD UK

TVD Live Shots: This Will Destroy You at the Electric Ballroom, 7/6

I’ve never been a big fan of solely instrumental songs or instrumental bands for that matter. Music without lyrics always made me think of movie soundtracks or classical music, two things I wasn’t into at all.

But there was a problem for me as a music lover. As a writer in my day job, I find it nearly impossible to write while listening to songs with lyrics. I needed to find something inspiring and not distracting. I needed to find a band that could create something that could be the soundtrack to my life, representing ups and downs, triumph and tragedy, anger and frustration, while tying it all together with the essence of cool and a touch of mystique. Enter San Marco, Texas band This Will Destroy You and their self-titled 2008 release.

Often compared to Explosions in the Sky, which was recommended by several of my friends over the years which still haven’t dove into yet, this quartet burst onto the scene in the early 2000s and quickly gained notoriety among the most prestigious critics. Their sound has been called “near perfect,” their overall tone referred to as, “it doesn’t get much better,” and one critic, in particular, claimed their debut to be “an astonishingly beautiful work that promises a bright future,” priming the record for many best-of lists that year.

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The TVD Storefront

TVD Radar: Ryuichi Sakamoto: Coda begins theatrical run; National screening dates announced for summer

VIA PRESS RELEASE | One of the most important artists of our era, Ryuichi Sakamoto has had a prolific career spanning over four decades, from techno-pop stardom to Oscar-winning film composer. The evolution of his music has coincided with his life journeys. Following Fukushima, Sakamoto became an iconic figure in Japan’s social movement against nuclear power. As Sakamoto returns to music following cancer, his haunting awareness of life crisis leads to the resounding new masterpiece that would ultimately become the acclaimed album async. Ryuichi Sakamoto: Coda is an intimate portrait of both the artist and the man.

“I wanted this film to explore how Ryuichi Sakamoto’s awareness of environmental, social and even his personal crises brought change to his musical expression,” explains director Stephen Nomura Schible. “I had the title Coda in mind since the very beginning, as I wanted the film to land with a musical ending—with the birth of a new song. My hope is that those who journey with this film may find it to be like an opening of perception, allowing for a chance to imagine how Ryuichi Sakamoto hears the world, and to witness how he ultimately triumphs to find new musical expression in the end.”

Ryuichi Sakamoto: Coda, named a “Critic’s Pick” by the New York Times, had its theatrical premiere in New York last weekend at the Film Society of Lincoln Center, grossing the highest opening weekend per-screen average for a foreign-language documentary in over a year. The film will open in Los Angeles and other markets, before expanding nationally throughout the summer. The film will premiere exclusively on MUBI this fall following the theatrical run.

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The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve:
David Sylvian,
Brilliant Trees

Sound reads from the archives, all summer long.Ed.

When UK new wavers Japan broke up in 1982, the members predictably splintered off into various directions, and the highest profiles belonged to Mick Karn and David Sylvian. Over the decades the latter has amassed a solo and collaborative discography of unlikely reach and impressiveness; however, giving a fresh listen to ‘84’s Brilliant Trees makes abundantly clear Sylvian’s career trajectory isn’t as surprising as it might initially seem.

Upon consideration, very few musicians who made their name in the pop sphere have aged as well as David Sylvian. Of course, this is mainly due to his choice after Japan’s dissolution (they briefly reunited for one self-titled ’91 album under the name Rain Tree Crow) to gradually leave the milieu that fostered his initial reputation. The subsequent journey led him into the outlying territories of experimentation and the avant-garde, though this shouldn’t give the false impression that Sylvian’s post-Japan oeuvre is devoid of pop elements.

As a youngster of the ‘80s, I knew little of Japan, my discovery of Sylvian supplied by his ’87 collaboration with Ryuichi Sakamoto, Secrets of the Beehive. The introduction was made through the frequent play and promotion of said disc by my hometown Mom & Pop record mart, an enterprise also involved in the sale of high end stereo equipment.

To my teen mind any system comprised of separate components was high end, and at the time Secrets of the Beehive basically eluded me, as did much “deep-listening” material attached to ambient, new age, minimalism, art-pop etc. Reengaging with Sylvian as a mature adult provided, if not an epiphany than another instance aiding the realization that artistic assessments work in tandem with personal growth, therefore flouting finality.

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The TVD Storefront

Ruby Rose Fox,
The TVD First Date

“I was an ’80s kid who was raised in a small insular Christian cult. My parents’ vinyl collection and the radio was one of my only portals into discovering what was really out there.”

“I spent a lot of time with about twelve records. Carol King’s Tapestry, the West Side Story soundtrack, Man of La Mancha, a Bill Cosby comedy album (I know), James Taylor, Debussy, Mozart, and Billy Joel. I loved them. I loved the way they felt and smelled and even more so that they were mine.

When I started making records it was really important that I always had vinyl available. I say that I don’t have a vinyl collection because I’m always pouring the money I have right back into the next record, but it’s probably because my mom threw away all my records when I went to summer camp and I just never got over it. I did just receive a killer Erykah Badu record from a very special person, so 2018 could be the year!

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The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve:
Don McLean,
American Pie

Where were you the day the music died? I was living in rustic Littlestown, Pennsylvania, and at the tender age of 4 months I didn’t know Buddy Holly from a jar of pureed peas.

But that’s the amazing thing about Don McLean’s 1971 masterpiece “American Pie.” I can’t listen to it without feeling a sense of immense loss. McLean brings the November 1959 plane crash near Clear Lake, Iowa that took the lives of Holly, Richie Valens, and The Big Bopper and lays it at my door.

The music didn’t really die that day; had that been the case, Don McLean wouldn’t have had the material to write the moralistic social and musical allegory that is “American Pie.” Anyway, without further ado, here are some random thoughts on some words and music that spoke to an entire generation.

1. “American Pie” succeeds as a piece of narrative poetry. It’s not great narrative poetry like Gordon Lightfoot’s “The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald,” mind you, but its’ encapsulates the years between 1959-1969 in order to anatomize two kinds of death; first, the death of first wave rock and roll in that frozen cornfield in Iowa, and second, the death of hippie innocence personified by the murder of Meredith Hunter at the hands of the Hell’s Angels at Altamont.

2. McLean kept mum about the meaning of his lyrics for decades. He told one interviewer, “They’re beyond analysis. They’re poetry.” When another interview asked what the song meant he replied, “It means I don’t ever have to work again if I don’t want to.”

3. Buddy Holly chartered that doomed Beechcraft 35 Bonanza because he wanted to catch up on his laundry. In short, he didn’t die in the name of rock’n’roll. He died in the name of clean underwear.

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A morning mix of news for the vinyl inclined

In rotation: 7/16/18

The Music Industry At 2018’s Midpoint: Jack White Snags The Bestselling Vinyl: Vinyl has been steadily growing in popularity for years now, and while it still isn’t a major media format in the U.S. (at least not when compared to streams and sales of CDs and digital albums), the rate at which more Americans are choosing to buy wax is still impressive. Since the same point in time last year, vinyl sales have grown by over 19%, and that trend may continue for the coming years, as it hasn’t slowed down yet. Pushing vinyl’s continued reemergence is a healthy mix of new titles and longstanding favorites which people in America can’t seem to get enough of.

Newcastle, UK | Newcastle record shop hopes to host music and comedy gigs in store. Beyond sells a range of vinyl records and CDs from at its shop on Westgate Road. A vinyl record shop in Newcastle is planning to host live music and comedy gigs to turn itself into a hub for the city’s music lovers. Beyond opened its doors on Westgate Road in March but is already planning to expand to give music fans somewhere they can meet up and discuss their favourite tracks. The shop is run by David McGovern, who has worked in record stores since 1996. After feeling that music shops no longer provided places for the local community to hang out, he decided to open his own store. Commenting on how he intends to make his business different from other shops, Mr McGovern said: “It’s about making it more about the customer and having a chat with them when they come in. We make it a bit more personal…”

Peoria, IL | Storm destroys thousands of albums at Peoria music store: When it comes to music in Peoria, particularly of the recorded variety, few can match devotion like Craig Moore. The septuagenarian rock-music performer might be best known around town as owner of Younger than Yesterday, a Central Peoria store jammed with tens of thousands of albums and ancillary artifacts. Looking for a copy of “Trout Mask Replica” by Captain Beefheart and his Magic Band? There’s a good chance Moore’s store has it. Unfortunately for Moore, more than 4,000 of his albums were destroyed recently. To quote a rock duo that fell from grace almost as quickly as it ascended, blame it on the rain. Or the monsoon, more accurately. “To end up in a situation where I have to Dumpsterize thousands of these records rubs me the wrong way…”

Friday The 13th Part V: A New Beginning soundtrack released on deluxe 2xLP: Henry Manfredini’s complete soundtrack for 1985 horror film Friday The 13th Part V: A New Beginning has been released on deluxe double vinyl, via Waxworks. During the course of his career Manfredini has composed scores for over 100 films, including the entire Friday The 13th film series. Friday The 13th: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack has been remastered for this new reissue on “Imposter Jason” clear blue vinyl, with artwork by Matt Ryan Tobin.

Sufjan Stevens’ The Avalanche Gets First Vinyl Release. The Illinois companion album pressed on colored vinyl: Sufjan Stevens has announced the first vinyl release of The Avalanche, his 2006 companion album to the previous year’s Illinois. The 2xLP set is pressed on “Hatchback Orange” and “Avalanche White” colored vinyl, and it’s due out August 31 via Asthmatic Kitty…In June, Sufjan was invited to join the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences’ music branch. Earlier this year, he performed his Call Me by Your Name track “Mystery of Love” at the Oscars ceremony. He also recently shared a reworked version of Moses Sumney’s “Make Out in My Car.” Plus, he appeared on a cover of Leonard Cohen’s “Memories” with the National’s Matt Berninger and more.

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TVD Los Angeles

TVD’s The Idelic Hour with Jon Sidel

Greetings from Laurel Canyon!

I dosed and became invisible / A compilation of my dreams / Exploded in my sleep / Now there’s nothing left of me

I can’t seem to remember more than one or two Idelic Hours that landed on a Friday the 13th. I like number 13. After all, I was born on the 13th of December, so I can relate. I don’t find the number eerie or superstitious, just cool. This said, I grew up on the 12th floor of an apartment building in New York City and above us was the 14th floor—New York’s a city with no 13th floors. Strange thought but, does a 13th floor exist anywhere?

It got me thinking about a playlist of songs that are an album’s track number 13. To be honest, it’s too fucking hot in my garage to deal with digging for long player favorites in search of 13s. Instead this set pays tribute to track 13s of the future. Maybe the question is, will track 13s even exist in the future or simply become invisible? With streaming and millennial short attention spans, will  those “#13s” become as extinct as 13th floors themselves?

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TVD Washington, DC

TVD Live: Taylor Swift at FedExField, 7/10

PHOTOS: RICHIE DOWNSDespite the dizzying confluence of torches, fireworks, lights, immense video screens, dancing squads, light-up fan wristbands, and three-story snakes—so many snakes—in Taylor Swift’s big “Reputation” stadium tour, the best moment comes when she’s finally alone with the guitar.

It happens just over halfway in her two hour extravaganza when she’s on a B-stage, having been airlifted there by a light-up gondola while singing “Delicate.” It’s after the giddy heights of “Shake It Off” alongside tour openers Charli XCX and Camila Cabello (as well as another of those giant snakes) all while the fans’ wristband lights involuntarily blink Christmas colors.

Only then is she able to talk more to her fans as if they were old college buddies (“I’ve been thinking of you guys”). At the first of two sold out shows at Maryland’s FedEx Field for what she said was her 24th show in the area, she thanked fans for allowing her to go from teenage country sweetheart to high-volume pop music force. But she returned to her acoustic guitar roots all the same, with a spare version of “So It Goes…” from the new album and something from her Red album a half dozen years back that she hasn’t played for a while, “State of Grace.”

It was the rare moment of surprise and intimacy in a massive show whose every moment is plotted for maximum crowd convulsion. It’s audacious for a show this big to still largely be a vehicle to sell a new album, and playing 12 songs from Reputation (skipping only three of its tracks) meant squishing old favorites into medleys.

It was all fine with the audience of young girls, their indulgent parents, and a few guys, all excited for the big show and some decked out in a kind of Taylor cosplay, which ran from the troubling sight of grade schoolers in fishnets and lipstick to someone in full witch costume to one old guy in what looked to be an exploded newspaper.

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The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve:
Wire,
Document and Eyewitness

Sound reads from the archives, all summer long.Ed.

When informed of Wire’s plans to reissue Document and Eyewitness Geoff Travis, known the world over as the man who started Rough Trade (the label and the shops) retorted that the group was “completely mad.” This wouldn’t be especially significant except it was Travis who put up pounds to release the damned thing in the first place. This small anecdote is a big tipoff that Wire’s 1981 live LP, notorious to many and beloved by a few, is really quite special. On August 18th Pink Flag’s expanded multi-format edition will again illuminate the range and polarization of opinion.

I retain a fluctuating level of esteem for the live record, but as worthy captured performances continue to occasionally hit the racks it’s hard to deny that the form’s best days are basically behind it. To my ear the neck-and-neck contenders for the finest non-jazz live set ever waxed came relatively soon after the format’s invention, taped in ’62 and ’64 respectively; James Brown’s Live at the Apollo and Jerry Lee Lewis’ Live at the Star Club, Hamburg. These aren’t controversial choices of course, but they do amplify what’s missing from the vast majority of live records and why most are little more than artistic victory laps/obligatory pop and rock star rites of passage/bones tossed into the salivating yawp of easily satisfied fans.

Surely many early live discs were to varying levels studio-massaged sleight of hand, but in the cases of Brown and Lewis it was their abilities as performers that ultimately made those albums so massive. Plus, each slab possesses further crucial qualities in abundance; danger, uncertainty, surprise, and a legit sense of vérité. Document and Eyewitness is one of the only records I can recall a paid store employee vociferously steering me away from buying, said occasion circa-’88, with the extent of my Wire knowledge then consisting of “12XU” and a Peel Session. Based on that slim exposure I was eager for more, doubly so since Wire’s Harvest-EMI stuff was pretty scarce in my neck of the woods.

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The TVD Storefront

TVD Radar: 40 Years
in the Making: The Magic Music Movie
in theaters 8/3 (NY) and 8/10 (LA)

VIA PRESS RELEASE | Magic Music is one of the most fondly remembered bands of the Boulder Revolution of the late ’60s and early ’70s. Living in a makeshift camp up in the mountains, they would delight local residents and university students with their original songs, acoustic instruments, and light harmonies; their growing popularity brought them to the brink of success more than once. Unfortunately, they never signed a record deal and eventually broke up in 1975.

40 Years in the Making: The Magic Music Movie chronicles how one of their greatest fans, acclaimed director (and UC Boulder alumnus) Lee Aronsohn, tracked down the original band members four decades later to tell their story. More importantly, he makes a dream come true for himself, fellow fans, and the band, by bringing them all back to Boulder for a sold-out reunion concert that preserves their legacy for posterity.

40 Years in the Making: The Magic Music Movie opens in theaters on August 3 with additional markets to follow. The Orchard will release the film digitally on September 4. The film is written and directed by Emmy-nominated writer-producer Lee Aronsohn (Two and a Half Men, Big Bang Theory) and produced by Fleur Saville. Executive Producers are Aronsohn and Lisa Haisha and Producer is Jeff Jampol. Cinematography is by Dean Cornish with editing by Kyle Vorbach.

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The TVD Storefront

My Brothers and I,
The TVD First Date

“I had a vinyl collection before I had an actual record player. I’d go to a record store and see a cool LP from an artist I really enjoy or an old school best seller on discount and figured I should buy it, because I’d eventually get something to play this thing on.”

“After some time, and as my personal collection of unlistenable vinyl got a little bigger, my parents took out their collection from the attic to basically quadruple what I had accumulated. I’d spend hours just looking at the covers, opening up the albums and reading the descriptions. (Still no listening).

Around the same time, my grandparents had begun the process of moving homes. As it just so worked out, they discovered a record player that they had in storage that they weren’t using. They asked if I had a record player, to which we all know by now was a no, and gifted me their old one. It was in need of a new needle, but otherwise was in great condition.

I researched record player needles on the internet and found one that I thought would work. Well, as it turns out they don’t make some types of needles anymore, because they don’t make some types of record players anymore either—so why would they? Anywho, I ordered it online and checked the mailbox everyday for nearly a week.

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The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve:
Dixie Dregs,
Free Fall

Talk about your supposedly fun things I’ll never do again; it would take a million chimpanzees playing electrical instruments 100,000 years to make the ungodly synthesis of southern rock and progressive rock work, and I am here to tell you that Augusta, Georgia’s Dixie Dregs are not those chimpanzees.

The amazing thing? I used to OWN this band of daring genre blenders’ sophomore LP, 1977’s Free Fall. What’s more, I actually listened to the damn thing. I simply cannot come up with a more glaring example of the dangers of rampant marijuana abuse.

Oh, and have I mentioned that the Dixie Dregs play nothing but instrumentals? They don’t want the warming sound of an actual human voice to distract you from paying close attention to all of the whizz-bang playing. Or the best education in musical theory and composition a couple of degrees from Georgia State University can buy. Who needs Ronnie Van Zant when you’ve studied with Alice Shields? She’s a bona fide protege of Wendy Carlos!

But about the whole southern rock/prog fusion thing: It’s more or less a red herring. The Dixie Dregs attempt the impossible on only two tracks, and both tracks are less Dixie than dregs.

“Moe Down” works if your taste in hoedowns runs towards Aaron Copland. This isn’t the kind of thing you’ll want to square dance to. This is the kind of thing you’ll want to take notes on for your advanced course in The Cooption and Trivialization of Appalachian Culture. Talk about your aesthetic distance; the Dixie Dregs might as well be looking at southern culture from Mars.

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A morning mix of news for the vinyl inclined

In rotation: 7/13/18

The album at 70: A format in decline? …With lower revenue from recordings, album royalties aren’t the pension plan they once were, but the broader consecration of popular music as a heartbeat of 20th and 21st century culture extends far beyond the artists themselves. Anniversary coverage has proliferated — 20 years of OK Computer; 30 years of Bad; 70 years of ‘the album’. And there’s ever renewed interest in concertising albums whose creators have died or split up — reproducing a classic album live in the same way an orchestra might do with a classical score.

Los Angeles, CA | Capitol Studios’ Mastering King Goes Out on a Vinyl High. Says Ron McMaster, who retires on July 12, of making records: “The fact that it’s still strong blows my mind.” There’s a theory dubbed “nominative determinism,” a fancy name to describe people who gravitate to jobs that fit their names. You could hardly find a better example than the man who has sat alongside a mixing console and vinyl lathe in one of the basement studios in the Capitol Records tower for more than three decades. “What better name for a mastering engineer than… Ron McMaster!” says Ben Blackwell, the co-founder of Third Man Records, who has worked with the veteran on several projects. “Look up his credit on the Demolition Doll Rods’ first album — it’s my favorite listing on a record ever.” A quick scan of the credits reveals the listing burned into Blackwell’s memory: “Masterfully Mastered by the Master at Tower Mastering — Ron McMaster.”

Te Awamutu, NZ | Vinyl junkie in Te Awamutu for weekend fair: A self-described “record junkie” is bringing his travelling fair back to Te Awamutu for the third time in 10 years. Brian Wafer runs record fairs around the North Island and is hosting one at the Scout Hall on Saturday. The New Plymouth man has been collecting records for more than 50 years. The first song he ever listened to on vinyl was All My Loving by The Beatles at the age of 10. “It was one of the only ways to listen to music back then,” Brian says. “It’s still the best way to listen to music now.”

London, ENG | Twickenham Record Fair to raise money for charity: St Mary’s Church Hall will host the second Twickenham Record Fair later this month. The fair is organised by Eel Pie Records shop and vinyl lover Steve Sutton. It will feature 24 tables loaded with collectible vinyl from specialist traders presenting a massive selection of records. The event is free to the public, but there is a voluntary £1 contribution to go towards Shooting Star Chase. June’s fair raised almost £600 for the charity. Doors open at 9am and the Fair will run until 4:30pm.

Fourteen Genesis albums set for vinyl reissue: A total of 14 Genesis studio albums will be reissued on heavyweight vinyl next month via UMC / Virgin EMI. Trespass (1970), Nursery Cryme (1971), Foxtrot (1972), Selling England By The Pound (1973), The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway (1974), A Trick Of The Tail (1976), Wind & Wuthering (1976), …And Then There Were Three (1978), Duke (1980), Abacab (1981), Genesis (1983), Invisible Touch (1986), We Can’t Dance (1991) and Calling All Stations (1997) will all feature the original artwork and come with a download card. The only record not included in the series is the band’s 1968 debut From Genesis To Revelation.

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