TVD Chicago

TVD Live Shots: Black Star and Madame Gandhi at Taste of Chicago, 7/13

Twenty years ago, Yasiin Bey and Talib Kweli put out one of the greatest hip hop albums of all time, Mos Def And Talib Kweli are Black Star. On Friday, they brought it—along with some of their solo tracks—to the Taste of Chicago.

It made for a truly exceptional evening, especially considering the two rarely perform together under the Black Star moniker. Despite the heat, the crowd danced until they sweat and sang along with the two legendary emcees.

Up-and-comer Madame Gandhi’s opening set was worth the early arrival. She’s a bright and shining young voice in the feminist movement—and a great drummer to boot.

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The TVD Storefront

TVD Radar: “Little Steven” Van Zandt to keynote Making Vinyl Detroit, 10/1

“In those days, a record could change your life, so you lived off the energy coming from those singles. It was not something casual like it seems to be today. It was your life and your oxygen.”
Little Steven talking to TVD, October 2017

VIA PRESS RELEASE | Stevie Van Zandt is a musician, performer, label owner, songwriter, arranger, music producer, radio broadcaster, TV producer, actor, director, Broadway producer, activist, and education advocate.

And on Monday October 1, this member of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame known as “Little Steven,” will serve as keynote speaker of Making Vinyl 2018 at the Westin Book Cadillac Hotel in Detroit. The conference, which debuted in November 2017 attended by nearly 300 industry professionals from 16 countries, celebrates the global rebirth of the record manufacturing industry.

Known for his starring role as “Silvio Dante” in all seven seasons of HBO’s television drama The Sopranos, Van Zandt also helped create the “Jersey Shore” sound with the Asbury Jukes, and became a founding member of Bruce Springsteen & The E-Street Band (Co–Producing the band’s seminal albums The River and Born in the U.S.A., and with whom he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2014). Van Zandt’s own band, Little Steven and the Disciples of Soul, is currently on the road in Europe with their “Soulfire TeachRock Teacher Appreciation Tour,” his first solo tour in 20 years.

“Little Stevie Van Zandt might currently be the planet’s most charismatic, dedicated and visible crusader scrapping to preserve the dirty purity of rock ’ n’ roll.”
BruceSpringsteen.net

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TVD New Orleans

TVD Video Premiere: Future Cowboys, “Choose”

Jamie Bernstein wears many hats in the world of the arts. He is a singer-songwriter, an actor, and a record producer in New Orleans best known as an Americana artist who has recorded as J. the Savage and under his own name. With his new project, Future Cowboys, he veers off his well-trodden path. TVD is proud to present the world premiere of “Choose,” the first single from their debut record.

The track is a collaboration between Bernstein’s well-honed songwriting skills and the production work of Eren Cannata, an Emmy award-winning producer from Los Angeles. Miguel Oliveira, the owner of the production company Pantherburn Studios, is the mastermind behind the partnership between Bernstein and Cannata. They have created a fresh sound by adding modern production techniques to what is essentially singer-songwriter music.

The video was shot in the Maple Leaf Bar in New Orleans and in Metairie, Louisiana on June 18th, 2018. Bernstein enlisted local actor, director, and producer Armando Leduc to bring the song to life. Leduc recruited cameraman and lighting specialist Nick Pino and cast local burlesque dancer and actress Cherry Bombshell to play the female lead. Kyler Poche plays the male lead.

The full Future Cowboys’ recording will be released in October on vinyl, which is being pressed at the Crescent City’s new production facility, the New Orleans Record Press. The rest of the music can be previewed here.

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The TVD Storefront

RYVOLI,
The TVD First Date

“I think the reason I even started listening to music in the first place was because of the vinyl cover artwork for Chicago IX: Greatest Hits.

“This is actually one of my first memories as a kid, discovering their artistic masterpiece in my dad’s library of records. I was absolutely mesmerized by this big group of guys and a dog who were hanging from some sort of suspended rickety platform, painting bright, bold letters on a wall. Blank canvas, colors, and danger…what more could a kid want? Then you flip the cover over—the guys are gone, they’ve finished their iconic band name, and there’s paint dripping everywhere! I was hooked. The very first song I ever heard on vinyl was “25 Or 6 to 4.”

My own personal collection started with an album that was passed down to me from my mother who had originally received it from her dad. During the 1960s and ’70s, Firestone would sell you a Christmas album for $1 along with your new set of tires or rotation. My reserved grandpa, I imagine on a whim, must have picked up Firestone Presents Your Christmas Favorites, Volume 3 while buying his snow tires. Let me say, since I was five or six, it does not feel like Christmas unless I’ve heard this record at least ten times.

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The TVD Record Store Club

Graded on a Curve:
New in Stores, July
2018, Part Three

Part three of the TVD Record Store Club’s look at the new and reissued releases presently in stores for July, 2018. Part one is here and part 2 is here.

NEW RELEASE PICKS: Emma Tricca, St. Peter (Dell’Orso) After three full-lengths and an EP, the latest from Rome-born and London-based singer-songwriter Emma Tricca features a handful of notable guests, including Dream Syndicate guitarist Jason Victor (who also produced) and Sonic Youth drummer Steve Shelley. Thus, her often Brit-folk-reminiscent sound (with occasional gusts from up the Canyon) has acquired a new flavor. Victor’s input means the sweet Paisley Underground vibe of “Fire Ghost” (wherein Arizona roots giant Howe Gelb lends a vocal hand) is no coincidence, but with her songwriting and personality shining throughout the record, it’s still clearly Tricca’s show. “Solomon Said” welcomes a terrific spoken-word cameo from folk cornerstone (and formative Tricca influence) Judy Collins. A-

Forma, Semblance (Kranky) Mark Dwinell, George Bennett, and John Also Bennett are Brooklyn’s Forma, now four albums deep with this one their second for Kranky. Their goal is to “broaden the idea of what an electronic music ensemble can sound like,” and they’ve succeeded, but with clear ties to precedent. One can detect Krautrock’s electronic models and certainly ’90s techno, but most rewarding to these ears are the elements derived from the classical minimalism of the ’70s, and not just Glass and Reich but significant gusts of Terry Riley. Plus, Forma aren’t just swiping from a distance and then serving up a pastiche, as George and John are recent vets of minimalist composer Jon Gibson’s group. Across seven tracks and a concise whole, the music spreads far beyond the cited stylistic points. A-

REISSUE/ARCHIVAL PICKS: Steve Reich, Drumming (Superior Viaduct) Intermingling African percussion and Balinese gamelan-derived polyrhythms with the still-budding impulse of classical Minimalism, this reissues a crucial entry in Reich’s oeuvre. In their promo text, Superior Viaduct touts it as one of the 20th century’s most important musical works, and upon time spent, it’s a statement devoid of hyperbole. But hey, I was already somewhat in agreement, though my conclusion was based on the 1974 recording of the piece as released by Deutsche Grammophon. This one, captured in performance at NYC’s Town Hall in late 1971 and released only in a private edition of 600 (this is its first-time vinyl and CD reissue), is even sharper and more entrancing as it extends to nearly 83 glorious minutes. A+

Masta Ace Incorporated, SlaughtaHouse & Sittin’ On Chrome (Craft Recordings) Offering five reissues of vintage titles from the vaults of Delicious Vinyl, Craft is doing wax-loving fans of old-school hip-hop a considerable service. All are included in this week’s column, but we’ll award the pick to Masta Ace, who was already well-seasoned and underrated at the point of ’93’s SlaughtaHouse (he got his start as a member of Marley Marl’s Juice Crew and had a prior, pre-Incorporated full-length under his belt). Listening today, it’s status as a classic is secure. Masta Ace hailed from Brooklyn, but the second and final Incorporated release is something of a bridge between East Coast and West; unsurprisingly, it was his biggest seller, but it’s not as strong as what came directly before. It still holds up, however. / A-

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A morning mix of news for the vinyl inclined

In rotation: 7/19/18

Plymouth, UK | Plymouth’s most colourful business which is bringing back vinyl: Welcome to the house of wax – the South West’s ONLY producer of vinyl records is based in Plymouth. Disc Manufacturing Services Ltd (DMS) is one of the most successful independent record labels in the industry, making a name for itself around the country and abroad and supporting city talent. The firm, operating from The Pressing House in Lipson, puts out CDs and DVDs – but it is its coloured vinyl discs that are really catching the eye. It can produce quality seven-inch, 10-inch and 12-inch platters in a range of weight and colours. And it offers a huge variety of packaging options in runs as little as 250 units. DMS has been pressing quality vinyl records for customers worldwide since 2004, having originated at Plymouth Musicians Co-operative in 1999.

Sydney, AU | Vinyl lives! The Record Store, Darlinghurst: The Record Store in Goulburn Street, Darlinghurst is where you find Stephan Gyory (after 11am, “we keep civilised hours here”) surrounded by vinyl records of almost every genre (“but we don’t want your old Trance or Prog vinyl”) He’s been in the vinyl record trade since he started at BPM Records in Oxford St (above the old Army disposal store) in 1994. At one stage, in the late 90s, there were fourteen dance music record stores in Darlinghurst. Sometimes at night in Darlinghurst it’s now difficult to find fourteen people. But Stephan is optimistic about the future of the Oxford St precinct. “I run the local Chamber of Commerce. I’m currently on the City of Sydney late-night advisory panel, which is looking at how to diversify nightlife.”

Shreveport, LA | Funeral arrangements set for Stan “The Record Man” Lewis: Funeral arrangements have been made for Stan “The Record Man” Lewis. His service will be held at 11 a.m. Thursday at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church, 522 E. Flournoy Lucas Road in Shreveport…Lewis, 81, passed away over the weekend. People have since been sharing fond memories of the man who was a legend in the Shreveport area and an icon in the music industry. It all started with the opening of his record shop on Texas Street in Shreveport in 1948. The business grew into multiple stores and a nationwide mail order service. Elvis was known to stop in to buy records while the Louisiana Hayride was in town.

Cheshire, UK | Quirky new waffle and ice cream shop where you can sign your own record deal opens in Chester. wRaps & Records is the sister venue to Thai eatery Nine Elephants. A quirky new dessert shop where customers can build their perfect waffle whilst listening to their favourite music opens its doors in Chester this week. Classic vinyl cafe wRaps & Records, located on Chester’s historic City Walls above Northgate Street, is the brainchild of Nicholas Friar and Ice Rattaphaet who are the team behind neighbouring Thai restaurant Nine Elephants which opened earlier this year. Customers are invited to browse through crates of classic and modern vinyl music, select the one they want to listen to and then fill out their very own ‘record deal’ based on their own terms and conditions, where they choose from a mouth-watering array of desserts before signing on the dotted line.

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TVD Washington, DC

TVD Live Shots:
FITNESS and Wild Moccasins at the
Black Cat, 7/15

Los Angeles based FITNESS is an exciting new project featuring music masterminds Max Collins of Eve 6 and Kenny Carkeet, formerly of Awolnation. Veterans of the music industry, Collins and Carkeet have both experienced great commercial success and popularity with their former bands as well as from songwriting for other artists.

The duo have been close friends and writing songs as a team for several years. Two years ago they decided to launch FITNESS, a labor of pure love, and a creative outlet to really write the kind of songs they wanted to write. No rules, no expectations, no bullshit.

I was pleased to catch their set at the Black Cat in Washington, DC over the weekend, and the room was packed. The Black Cat is a legendary punk rock club in the District and a perfect venue to hear the band. It’s always a treat to see such an explosive show in an intimate setting.

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The TVD Storefront

TVD Radar: Nelson Mandela’s Favorite African Folktales
vinyl in stores 10/5

VIA PRESS RELEASE | Born July 18, 1918, Nelson Mandela remains a shining icon 100 years later; tributes to this great man and his contributions are planned by world leaders throughout 2018. This vinyl pressing includes stories read by Don Cheadle, Whoopi Goldberg, Samuel L Jackson, and Alan Rickman, with music by Vusi Mahlasela.

Winner of the 2010 Audie for Audiobook of the Year, Nelson Mandela’s Favorite African Folktales is an extraordinary audiobook featuring the voice talents of LeVar Burton, Gillian Anderson, Benjamin Bratt, Ricardo Chavira, Don Cheadle, Matt Damon, Whoopi Goldberg, Sean Hayes, Hugh Jackman, Samuel L. Jackson, LaTanya Richardson Jackson, Scarlett Johansson, Debra Messing, Helen Mirren, Parminder Nagra, Sophie Okonedo, CCH Pounder, Alan Rickman, Jurnee Smollett, Charlize Theron, Blair Underwood, Forest Whitaker, and Alfre Woodard with a special message from Archbishop Desmond Tutu and original music by South African legends by Johnny Clegg and Vusi Mahlasela, directed by Alfre Woodard.

The audiobook was a truly international affair recorded in Los Angeles, New York, Miami, London, and Johannesburg. The stories were chosen by the Nobel Laureate himself, from every region of Africa. “We hope this audiobook will be enjoyed by people of all ages across the globe, increasing awareness of Africa’s rich cultures while creating a better future for South Africa’s most vulnerable children,” said ANSA Executive Director Sharon Gelman.

In his original foreword for the folktales, Nelson Mandela wrote, “It is my wish that the voice of the storyteller may never die in Africa, that all the children of the world may experience the wonder of books.” The audiobook brings his vision full circle, as these timeless tales return to the oral tradition to be heard around the world.

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The TVD Storefront

Poster Children,
The TVD First Date

“Vinyl to me is something that I look back at now as super personal to my childhood.”

“My dad had a bunch of old records and was also a musician. He had tons of Beatles albums and Billy Joel albums (don’t judge), or at least those are the ones I could remember. They all sat in a nice area below the raised hi-fi that was like a piece of furniture for the living room. Back then those towering speakers seemed so massive and the huge silver volume knob on the stereo was one of those small pieces of control for a youth.

As I started playing in bands, there were older people who referenced albums that changed their lives and “Did you ever check out this one?!” That included a lot of classic Zeppelin for some reason. Then the super ’70s-ish artwork caught my eye more than anything. Specifically Yes records that kept popping up in friends’ collection of music. I thought that was so weird and magical all at the same time as the artwork made me want to at least hear what was on that piece of plastic.

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The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve: Humble Pie, Eat It

Sound reads from the archives, all summer long.Ed.

When it comes to most 1970s double LPs, you can count me out. Especially the live ones. Bands almost inevitably saw them as an opportunity to stretch out, and engage in long, boring, and masturbatory free form shenanigans. Whole sides given over to one song! And in some cases, such as The Allman Brothers’ Eat a Peach and Canned Heat’s Living the Blues, TWO sides dedicated to one song! But look on the bright side. Should you ever decide you want out of this world, all you’ll have to do is put on Canned Heat’s 41-minute version of “Refried Boogie,” and presto! Suicide by ennui.

England’s Humble Pie was as guilty as the rest. On the band’s 1971 double live LP Performance: Rockin’ the Fillmore, Steve Marriott and company dedicated whole album sides to both Dr. John’s “I Walk on Gilded Splinters” and Muddy Waters’ “Rollin’ Stone.” Rockin’ the Fillmore is not so much an album as a tar pit, perfect for sinking slowly into on Seconal, Nembutals, and all the other great downers that made the seventies the Decade of Drool. I did my fair share and they were fun, especially when it came to basic motor skills, so much fun indeed that I once attempted to force a forkful of spaghetti into my forehead.

But Humble Pie redeemed itself with the 1973 double LP Eat It, because (1) I spent a lot of time listening to it as a kid, (2) there was simply no beating front man Steve Marriott—the legendary former guitarist and vocalist for The Small Faces—when he was at the top of his game, and most importantly (3) only one of its four sides is live. Amazing! Not a 40-minute track to be found! And what’s more its mix of hard rock originals, quieter numbers, jacked-up soul classics, and good old hippie blooz inexplicably works, thanks to the wonderfully grainy voice of Marriott—one of rock’s most unheralded lead singers—three of the greatest backup singers ever, and a band proficient enough to master songs from any genre under the sun.

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TVD Washington, DC

Play Something Good with John Foster

The Vinyl District’s Play Something Good is a weekly radio show broadcast from Washington, DC.

Featuring a mix of songs from today to the 00s/90s/80s/70s/60s and giving you liberal doses of indie, psych, dub, post punk, americana, shoegaze, and a few genres we haven’t even thought up clever names for just yet. The only rule is that the music has to be good. Pretty simple.

Hosted by John Foster, world-renowned designer and author (and occasional record label A+R man), don’t be surprised to hear quick excursions and interviews on album packaging, food, books, and general nonsense about the music industry, as he gets you from Jamie xx to Liquid Liquid and from Courtney Barnett to The Replacements. The only thing you can be sure of is that he will never ever play Mac DeMarco. Never. Ever.

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The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve: Wimps,
Garbage People

Seattle trio Wimps have been dishing catchy garage-punk since 2013 or thereabouts, but on their new album and second for Kill Rock Stars, they connect as one of the sweetest of all things; a shit-hot party band that doesn’t fall short in the studio. Not just sweet but rare, and that the party resembles a wild, inclusive weekend art-college throwdown (just after exams) is all the better. As Garbage People speeds along, numerous predecessors do spring to mind, but the whole is never burdened with similarity as they possess a fair amount of range. It’s out now on vinyl, compact disc, cassette, and digital.

To give you some sense of what Wimps are about, the cover to their 2014 “Party At the Wrong Time” 7-inch is a drawing of a hot dog in bun wearing sunglasses while riding a skateboard and doing the Egyptian. It reinforces the music guitarist-vocalist Rachel Ratner, bassist-vocalist Matt Nyce, and drummer David Ramm make; if not exactly lighthearted, it’s never ponderous. Instead, there’s a fair amount of humor at play, though sidewalk-surfing frankfurter aside, Wimps are never offputtingly zany.

The title of the above 7-inch might lead some to assume that’s from whence my party band association derives, but the conclusion was drawn prior to dipping back into the band’s catalog. Wimps’ earlier output, which commenced with the Repeat LP on the End of Time label (currently in its third pressing), isn’t radically different from what they’re up to now, though their initial sound, loaded with riffs and energy and consistently non-generic, is the basis for some drawn comparisons to the early Rough Trade shebang.

It’s a solid precursor to what Wimps are up to now; amongst other habits, they like songs about noshing (Repeat mentions cheeseburgers and the refusal to eat “Old Food”), which sheds some additional light on that hot dog and brings us to one of Garbage People’s highlights. But don’t let’s get ahead of ourselves. “Giant Brain” opens their new one, based around a clean art-punkish guitar line reminiscent of those found on Repeat but continuing the songwriting progression that informed Suitcase, 2015’s debut for Kill Rock Stars.

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A morning mix of news for the vinyl inclined

In rotation: 7/18/18

Shreveport, LA | Remembering Stan “The Record Man” Lewis: A Shreveport music pioneer dies over the weekend. Now he’s being remembered by those who knew him best as helping discover the sound of an entire generation. “A man that loved what he did and that’s why he was Stan the Man…the Record Man. Seriously.” Lenny Lewis is remembering his father, Stan “The Record Man” Lewis, a musical pioneer and international music industry exec. “A man that loved something, that never got out of his system. Loved the music industry. He loved it.” Stan and his wife Pauline opened his music store in Shreveport, but it eventually grew into so much more. Garland Jones say, “Most people for the most part only knew about the store, the retail store. They didn’t know behind that store, there was probably 200 people working behind the scenes as one of the largest record distributors in the country.” Stan’s business eventually expanded to six stores.

Shreveport, LA | Shreveport music legend Stan ‘The Record Man’ Lewis dies, age 91: Stan Lewis — known in Shreveport as “The Record Man” — has died. He was 91. Lewis died Saturday morning in Ruston where he lived for the past several months, according to his son, Lenny Lewis. Visitation will be 5-7 p.m. Wednesday, July 18 at Roseneath Funeral home, 1815 Marshall St. in Shreveport. The public visitation will be followed by readings from a priest and speakers from 7-8 p.m. In the 1940’s, Lewis, a Shreveport native, was a music distributor and retailer as the owner of Stan’s Record Shops. He eventually operated a nationwide mail-order and distributor service and record label. “He was definitely ‘Stan The Record Man,'” Lenny Lewis said of his father. “He ate and breathed music.”

Nashville, TN | Third Man Records announces Nashville photo studio: Third Man Records is pleased to announce the addition of a photo studio to their Nashville location. The newly opened Third Man Photo Studio specializes in high-quality photographic film development and analog print processing using the darkroom hidden in the walls of the famed Blue Room. Third Man’s photo chemists hand process C-41 (Color Negative), Black & White, and E-6 (Color Positive/Slide) films, and they use traditional photographic enlargement techniques to create one-of-a-kind archival quality prints from film negatives. This is a hands-on, all analog process, which yields the highest quality photographic prints possible: completely free of pixels and ink.

Boston, MA | The world’s best record shops #115: In Your Ear, Boston: Found a stones throw from the snaking Charles River that flows through the city of Boston, one of America’s oldest, and arguably its most boisterous, cities, In Your Ear boasts a musical heritage that stretches back for decades. 36 years to be exact, first opening its doors in 1982 and now owned by Reed Lappin, Mark Henderson and Chris Zingg. “We are all music lovers, we have no other skills,” laughs Lappin, but what skills they do have they channel into their 100,000+ strong record collection that climb the walls and takes over every conceivable space in this humble store. Their racks span everything from classic rock and weirdo jazz to euphoric disco, rare boogie from a bygone era and Detroit techno, making In Your Ear a quintessential slice of Americana.

Mapping Record Stores: New York City in the 1970s and 1980s: Between the early 1960s and the mid 1990s, the independent record store was a mainstay in New York culture, providing a space for music fans, critics, and creators to congregate and share the burgeoning rock and roll, disco, dance, and new wave scenes. A basic understanding of economics and technological change, however, can explain the sharp decline in the world’s record stores since the 1990s. Besides the shift to digital consumption of music, New York has become one of the most expensive cities for commercial renters, leading to the loss not only of its shops, but the sense of community they once provided.

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TVD New Orleans

Theryl “Houseman” DeClouet, 1951–2018

Theryl “Houseman” DeClouet, the soulful New Orleans singer and occasional actor who was best known for his role as featured vocalist in the early days of the funk band Galactic, passed away on Sunday, July 15 at 66. He had been ill for some time and was in hospice care.

DeClouet was a singer with an emotion-laden, wide-ranging voice that could swoop to the heights like his mentor Johnny Adams, but was often likely to dig to the depths bringing out the socially conscious pathos in his original songs like “Ain’t No Yachts in the Ghetto” and “Pocket Change,” and covers like Marvin Gaye’s “What’s Goin’ On” or Edwin Starr’s soul classic “War (What is it Good For?).”

In the 1980s he was a perennial performer at the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival and appeared around town with bands like the Lyrics, the a capella band Hollygrove, and his R&B outfit, Theryl and Reel Life. By the early 1990s, he was also gigging with the percussionist Mike Ward and his band, Reward.

His association with Galactic began when the band was in its infancy and had yet to solidify into its longtime lineup of bassist Robert Mercurio, guitarist Jeff Raines, drummer Stanton Moore, keyboardist Rich Vogel, and saxophonist Ben Ellman. Members of the band have issued statements via Facebook attesting to DeClouet’s critical role as mentor and early vocalist for the group.

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The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve: Killdozer and Alice Donut, Michael Gerald’s Party Machine Presents!

Sound reads from the archives, all summer long.Ed.

Killdozer and Alice Donut: two bands for people with great taste that taste great together! Uniting to produce some of the greatest music ever! Talk about your coups! Why didn’t this baby win a Grammy? Because as Elvis Costello said, “Radio is in the hands of such a lot of fools/Trying to anesthetize the way that you feel.” That and both bands have about a 1,000 fans, each.

Madison, Wisconsin’s Killdozer (1983-96) was renowned for its macabre sense of humor—as expressed in the hilariously morbid lyrics of vocalist/bassist Michael Gerald—and gave us such immortal songs as “Hamburger Martyr” (man murders fry cook for making bad burger after saying, “I could make a better hamburger with my asshole!”) and castration ode “The Puppy” (“My old lady’s name is Lois/I love it when sucks my dink/When we set Sonny’s balls on fire/She didn’t even blink”). And then there’s their EP “Burl,” which they dedicated “to the loving memory” of Burl Ives when he was still among the living. As for their music, it was a monstrously loud and grating blues-based noise punk with savage guitars, a big distorted bass, and the unbelievably low-pitched vocal sneer of Gerald.

As for NYC’s Alice Donut (1987-95, 2001 to NOW), they are a freaky outfit that shares Killdozer’s humorously bleak view of existence but expresses it in a less, er, Wisconsin Death Trip kinda way. They focus on the perversities of existence, as is evident from the title of their 1989 LP, Bucketfulls of Sickness and Horror in an Otherwise Meaningless Life (whose two sides are called “Side Sickness” and “Side Horror”) and such great songs as (the quite pretty) “Tiny Ugly Life” and “The Son of a Disgruntled X-Postal Worker Reflects on His Life While Getting Stoned in the Parking Lot of a Winn-Dixie While Listening to Metallica.”

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  • SUPPORTING YOUR LOCAL INDIE SHOPS SINCE 2007


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