The TVD Storefront

TVD Radar: Kellee Patterson, Maiden Voyage vinyl reissue
in stores 9/25

VIA PRESS RELEASE | As purportedly the first Black-owned jazz imprint since the ’20s, the Black Jazz label had its roots in the Black Power movement of the late ’60s and early ’70s. But not every album on the label had a social message. Kellee Patterson’s Maiden Voyage was simply an extremely tasteful, mellow jazz vocal album, recorded with the top-notch sidemen that characterized Black Jazz sessions.

Patterson first gained fame as the first Black woman (entered under her real name Pat Patterson) to win the Miss Indiana contest, culminating in a performance of “My Funny Valentine” at the Miss America pageant. Her success led to some acting gigs (the TV shows The Streets of San Francisco and The Dukes of Hazzard, and the movie Demolition Man), a brief brush with Hollywood fame (she was briefly linked romantically to talk show host Johnny Carson), and her signing with Gene Russell for her recording debut on Black Jazz (Russell went on to produce subsequent LPs for Patterson on the Shadybrook label).

1973’s Maiden Voyage is highlighted by a beautiful vocal performance by Patterson of Herbie Hancock’s title tune, backed with such premium players as long-time George Duke sideman John Heard on acoustic bass and Ray Charles touring band member George Harper on flute.

Our Real Gone reissue is remastered for CD and vinyl by Mike Milchner at Sonic Vision, with LP lacquer cutting by Clint Holley and Dave Polster at Well Made Music, and features new liner notes by Pat Thomas, author of Listen, Whitey! The Sights and Sounds of Black Power 1965-1975. An essential, though uncharacteristic, entry in the Black Jazz catalog.

Posted in The TVD Storefront | Leave a comment

The TVD Storefront

Westberg,
The TVD First Date

“From the height of a small child gazing up at the bureau, some of my earliest memories were born.”

“There in the dining room, my grandfather’s beloved record player would sit, and Sergei Prokofiev’s Peter and the Wolf would emanate from the room. The bustle of my grandmother cooking in the adjacent kitchen, the TV softly murmuring in the living room, and the Southern California suburbs of the early ’80s would dissipate as I was whisked into another world, a world that at times felt more tangible in my mind than that which existed in my reality. Music profoundly shaped my imagination and symbolized a kind of freedom for which I was relentless in my pursuits.

My grandfather was a lover of classical music and had an extensive collection of vinyl records, with the likes of Mahler, Beethoven, Choin, Stravinsky, and many more. At the age of four, I would improvise short cantatas which my grandmother would score in her well worn and tattered music book. Imagining myself the composer of an opera one day, I’d sit in a little nook I created in the dining room, eating string cheese, and one by one peel the layers as I dreamt. I absorbed the organic quality to the audio, the scratches and earthiness as the music’s timbres would rise and fall. I loved the physicality of placing the record on the turntable, carefully setting the needle, and letting the crackling sound of the speakers fill my ears.

My mom also shared a feverish love of music and vinyl records with my grandfather. She and her sisters all loved to sing together. One would take the melody and the other two each took a harmony line. Their voices would fill the room at holiday parties and family gatherings. My grandmother was a talented pianist who taught lessons for a time. Ours was a musical family and I always felt so grateful to have had the early experience of the record layer.

Read More »

Posted in The TVD Storefront | Leave a comment

The TVD Storefront

TVD Radar: The Podcast with Evan Toth,
Episode 2: Nicole Atkins

Nicole Atkins’ new album, Italian Ice is assured—it’s a portrait of an artist who is becoming an expert at finding her vision and rallying the troops around her to help bring it to fruition. But there is also a tenderness, a vulnerability, a maternal instinct to care for those around her and keep the keel even. This isn’t Nicole’s first visit to The Vinyl District, she has appeared on—not one—but two episodes of TVD’s In-Store with… record shopping segments.

Italian Ice was recorded at the famed Muscle Shoals Sound Studio and comes on with the thickest pop grooves you’d ever want to experience. On side two the signal fades and the dial mysteriously drifts into distant stations you may not normally tune in: oldies, retro radio, swing, seasick ballads, and psychedelic torch songs. Stop controlling everything, let Nicole be the captain on this voyage.

Nicole isn’t wasting her time during pandemic days, she’s gathered much of her band in her parent’s NJ home so they can quarantine together and produce a weekly program for Amazon Music called Live From the Steel Porch. It’s a musical variety show with special guests that’s just right for these times.

Evan Toth is a songwriter, professional musician, educator, radio host, avid record collector and hi-fi aficionado. Toth hosts and produces The Sharp Notes each Saturday evening at 6pm and TVD Radar on Sundays at 5AM on WFDU, 89.1 FM. Follow him at the usual social media places and visit his website.

Posted in The TVD Storefront | Leave a comment

The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve:
The Stone Roses,
The Stone Roses

As a famous man (I think it was Geoffrey Chaucer) once said, time waits for no man. And in the case of Manchester’s The Stone Roses, the five long years that passed between this, their massively popular 1989 debut, and 1994’s Second Coming were fatal. Come Second Coming baggy pants and bucket hats were passe, and Britpop ruled England’s green and pleasant land.

Those five years may have been piddling compared to the 14 years that elapsed between Guns N’ Roses’ The Spaghetti Incident and Chinese Democracy, but those five years they were an eternity–during the same time span The Beatles went from Meet the Beatles to Abbey Road.

The Stone Roses’ half-decade of silence stemmed form a variety of issues, the most important of which was a protracted effort to sever ties with their record label, but it doesn’t much matter. In his poem “The Second Coming” (sound familiar?) William Butler Yeats foresaw a rough beast slouching towards Bethlehem, waiting to be born. The Stone Roses’ follow-up didn’t so much slouch towards the record stores as crawl, and by the time it arrived Engand’s notoriously fickle trend watchers had long since written them off.

None of which detracts from the fact that The Stone Roses is one killer LP. The album’s rave-friendly dance rhythms and hypnotic grooves would seem to put The Stone Roses in the same category as fellow Mancunians the Happy Mondays, but they took it the extra yard by fusing said dance rhythms with the Happy Daze psychedelic guitar sounds of the mid to late ‘60s. Like the Happy Mondays, The Stone Roses produced dance music, but they could rock the arenas as well.

Read More »

Posted in The TVD Storefront | Leave a comment

A morning mix of news for the vinyl inclined

In rotation: 8/10/20

London, UK | New record store to open in London this month: A new record store is opening in London in August. Next Door Records will open in Shepherd’s Bush on Wednesday 12th August as a store, bar and café. After smashing its crowdfunding target of £3000, the three-man team behind the store promise to provide a “mixture of new and vintage vinyl which will span a variety of sounds for both the living room and the dancefloor.” The record store also hopes to host live music and DJ events, book launches, exhibitions and workshops in future. In the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, record stores have been allowed to open in the UK since June. During lockdown, an interactive map was developed to show what independent record stores were still operating in a limited capacity, and how you can buy from them. In that time, Bristol record shop Idle Hands issued a stark warning on how the pandemic might affect small, independent businesses. Earlier this year, a new record store and dubplate cutting house, Disc World, opened in New Cross, south east London.

San Francisco, CA | Popular SF record store closes permanently: ‘There just isn’t a way forward in the city.’ Stacks of colorful indie comics have slowly begun to replace the massive collection of vinyl records sold at 1-2-3-4 Go! Records on Valencia Street. On Monday afternoon, owner Steve Stevenson announced the San Francisco location would shutter after five years in business, with comic book shop and former DIY record label Silver Sprocket taking over for the remainder of the lease. “Given the uncertain direction of the pandemic and the heavy revenue losses we’ve sustained over the last 5 months there just isn’t a way forward in the city,” Stevenson wrote in a Facebook post, encouraging his clientele to support the comic book publisher in the coming months. Silver Sprocket, previously located on Haight Street, moved into the record shop in late February after a seismic retrofit taking place at their former location prevented them from resuming operations. Since the comic book shop was operating out of the building as a pop-up business without a formal lease, they knew that once the renovations were over, their landlord would likely begin the search for a permanent tenant.

Boynton, FL | Boynton record store had a side business as an illegal gambling operation, cops say: A Boynton Beach record store owner is accused of using her business to run an illegal gambling operation, taking in thousands of dollars in bets a day. Police arrested Alison Henry Abner, 49, of suburban Lake Worth on Thursday after serving a search warrant at the Caribbean Record Store on Gateway Boulevard, near U.S. Highway 1. Henry Abner is the owner and operator of the business, police said. During a search of the business, officers found more than $6,000 in cash, including a bundle of cash with separate gambling tickets and payouts attached. Investigators found more than $2,500 hidden in a bathroom wall. Abner was advised of her rights and taken to the police department for questioning. There, she reportedly admitted to running a gambling game out of the business. She told investigators she did not know the name of the game, but described it as a game of chance in which a person would pick between one and four numbers and put money on each number.

Athens, AL | Vinyl Revival: Record store keeping it old school in Athens: The music industry has undergone many changes over the years when it comes to keeping up with the modern digital age. Most people stream music from one of many apps on their smartphones these days, but not so long ago, music was found primarily on physical media. Even CDs have been largely phased out, but there’s still those who prefer something more than a digital file. That’s where record stores like Vinyl Revival in Athens comes in. Places like this small, local shop cater to clientele who like to keep things old school and still get their music on physical media like vinyl records. “I think records, above all other mediums, are pretty unique,” said owner Keith Montgomery. “It’s a hands-on experience. You have a jacket. It’s got its own artwork and lyrics. It’s an organic experience. There’s an argument to it, but generally speaking, I think that vinyl records sound ‘better’ than digital formats. I like it.” Montgomery is from Athens originally. He moved to Detroit in the late 1970s to be closer to some family members, but after he got married, he decided he didn’t want to raise his children in Detroit. So, the family moved back to Limestone County.

Read More »

Posted in A morning mix of news for the vinyl inclined | Leave a comment

TVD Los Angeles

TVD’s The Idelic Hour with Jon Sidel

Greetings from Laurel Canyon!

Circles, my head is going round in circles / My mind is caught up in a whirlpool, draggin’ me down

Time will tell if I’ll take the homeward track / The dizziness will make my feet walk back / Walk on back to you

Everything I do, I think of you / No matter how I try, I can’t get by

Circles, leading me back to you / Round and round and round / And round and round / And round and round / And round and round…

The week started on a special day—my son Jonah’s 12th birthday. Quarantine in LA has been tough at times, and watching an eleven year boy trapped in his room by himself all summer stirs a dad’s emotions.

Every now and then we’ve ventured to the beach where “the surf” has been synonymous with freedom. We did our best and organized a few friends for a socially distanced surf session Friday. Jonah had such a groovy time, but Saturday found the two of us depressed with birthday hangovers.

Like Pete Townshend with his mid-sixties angst, my mind was caught up in a whirlpool and dragging me down. I needed to flip the switch to positive. Monday morning I set the alarm for 6am and cruised back to the beach to watch the birthday boy surf a glassy three hour session.

Read More »

Posted in TVD Los Angeles | Leave a comment

The TVD Storefront

TVD Radar: The
Center of Nowhere
(The Spirit & Sounds of Springfield, Missouri)
streaming now

VIA PRESS RELEASE | The Center of Nowhere (The Spirit and Sounds of Springfield, Missouri), featuring musical legends Merle Haggard, Dan Penn, Brenda Lee and others, is a history and celebration of “America’s most overlooked music scene.”

Weaving the tale of how the rogue city on Route 66 shaped a compelling sound, influencing country, folk, gospel, rock, and roots music globally, the film has had its digital release on Tuesday August 4th, presented by KDMG and Social Construct. The Center of Nowhere premiered at the County Music Hall of Fame and was nominated for the Maverick Award for Best Documentary, Best Director and Special Achievement for animation sequences. The film was also an official selection at AmericanaFest and The St. Louis International Film Festival. Viewers can purchase or rent the film from various digital platforms including Amazon, Vimeo, and nationwide OnDemand on cable networks Comcast, Charter/Spectrum, and Cox.

The film explores how the culture of Springfield created a fiercely independent sound that has influenced artists all over the world, and includes additional interviews with Billboard chart-topping and Grammy-winning musicians such as Dave Alvin, punk rockers The Del Lords, members of the Ozark Mountain Daredevils, the pop rock band Somebody Still Loves You Boris Yeltsin, Jonathan Richman, Robbie Fulks, Syd Straw, and the final on camera interviews with Merle Haggard and Springfield music avatars Bobby “Lloyd” Hicks and Lou Whitney.

Read More »

Posted in The TVD Storefront | Leave a comment

The TVD Storefront

TVD Radar: The Podcast with Evan Toth,
Episode 1: Val Emmich

Welcome to the first episode of TVD Radar!

If you haven’t already, meet Val Emmich, he’s a New Jersey renaissance man: author, actor, and musician. He’s a real Jersey boy and a fellow alum of Rutgers University. You’ve probably seen him and not realized it. He’s been on 30 Rock—as Liz Lemon’s younger love interest—and had a major role in HBO’s Vinyl.

If you’re into curling up with a good book, you’ll want to check out his delightful novel, The Reminders which was published by Little, Brown and Company in 2017. In fact, his writing abilities are so admired that when the creators of the Broadway smash Dear Evan Hansen were looking for an author to write the young-adult version of their show, they chose Val. Of course, it debuted at #2 on the New York Times Bestseller List.

But, wait. What we’re here to discuss is Val’s excellent musical career. After building a loyal fanbase in the early 2000s, Emmich was signed to Epic Records’ Red Ink imprint who released his Slow Down Kid album. Val hasn’t slowed down and has independently released an impressive catalog of music during the last two decades. His latest release, Acting the Optimist is a tightly knit, efficient 10 track album; it’s loud, clever, focused, and continues to unfurl itself after several spins.

Originally recorded as a Zoom chat, join Evan and Val as they discuss the album’s emotional creation, life during pandemic times, songwriting, and more. You’ll hear that discussion and the entire record in this episode.

Evan Toth is a songwriter, professional musician, educator, radio host, avid record collector and hi-fi aficionado. Toth hosts and produces The Sharp Notes each Saturday evening at 6pm and TVD Radar on Sundays at 5AM on WFDU, 89.1 FM. Follow him at the usual social media places and visit his website.

Posted in The TVD Storefront | Leave a comment

The TVD Storefront

TVD Radar: Other Music doc announces wide digital release for 8/25

VIA PRESS RELEASE | Factory 25 is pleased to announce the wide digital release on Aug. 25 of Other Music, a documentary about the legendary NYC record store that closed in 2016. The store helped launch the careers of countless indie stars. The film will be available on Amazon Prime, iTunes, Google Play, etc.

The film was slated to have a theatrical run in April which was cancelled just as Covid hit. The filmmakers made lemonade out of lemons by partnering with over 200 temporarily-shuttered record stores and theaters on a Virtual Cinema release, which raised over 25k dollars for those places in a time when it was desperately needed. Tickets to stream the film were sold via the partners with 50% of the proceeds going to the store or theater in need. The cancelled April theatrical release was planned for the week of Record Store Day, and this wide digital release will coincide with the week of Record Store Day’s rescheduled ‘RSD Drops’ event.

The film delves into the iconic New York City record store’s influence with appearances by Tunde Adebimpe (TV On the Radio), Jason Schwartzman, Martin Gore (Depeche Mode), Matt Berninger (The National), Janeane Garofalo, Ezra Koenig (Vampire Weekend) and more.

“It’s a story about record stores, sure, but moreover it’s about the power of community, and the changing face of our cities and towns and culture. The film is a joyous celebration of creativity and the people and places that matter in this life. And it feels all the more relevant today.”
Josh Madell, Former Owner of Other Music

Read More »

Posted in The TVD Storefront | Leave a comment

The TVD Storefront

Chuck Eddy,
The TVD Interview

Chuck Eddy is America’s foremost music critic. Hell, he’s probably the world’s foremost music critic, unless you count the woman in North Korea who’s said to write one hell of a Laibach review. Over the past several decades Eddy’s smart-ass wit, super-charged prose, lightning flash (and often controversial) pronouncements) and mind-boggling knowledge of musical esoterica have made him a must read for anyone who gives a hoot about popular music.

Eddy’s abiding interest in (and love for) what he calls “inessential music,” championing of genre-blending (think country disco), and defense of such derided-by-the critics genres as New Country offer readers an ear-opening new perspective on popular music—read Chuck Eddy, and I guarantee you’ll never listen to music the same way again.

Eddy’s resume is too extensive to go into here. Suffice it to say he’s written thousands of articles for The Village Voice—where he served as musical editor for seven years–Creem, Rolling Stone, Spin, Entertainment Weekly and other forums.

Eddy’s books include Stairway to Hell: The 500 Best Heavy Metal Albums in the Universe (Harmony Books, 1991); The Accidental Evolution of Rock ‘N Roll: A Misguided Tour Through Popular Music (De Capo Press, 1997); Rock and Roll Always Forgets: A Quarter Century of Music Criticism (Duke University Press, 2011).and Terminated for Reasons of Taste (Duke University Press, 2016). Eddy currently dedicates his energies to programing music for Napster.

In the following interview Eddy talks about Stairway to Hell, which has been enraging metalheads for decades, declares his love for B-sides and dollar bins, says he doesn’t think of musicians as people and doesn’t give a flying fuck about their personal lives, and makes the astonishing admission that given the choice between having Guns ‘n’’ Roses or Suzanne Vega over for dinner, he’d go with Vega because “she eats less.”

And finally, he talks candidly about the “Infamous Beastie Boys Incident.”

Without further ado, a conversation with Chuck Eddy.

Read More »

Posted in The TVD Storefront | Leave a comment

The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve:
John Cale,
Paris 1919

I like to play hard to get. You know, listen to an album for a while before I ask it out on a date. Sure, there are exceedingly rare exceptions—thunderbolts of instantaneous amour that make me lose my composure and babble on about how wonderful an album is, and how I want to take it home to meet my family, and go out and surreptitiously shop around for a ring. This was what happened the first time I heard John Cale’s 1973 LP Paris 1919.

The Welsh Cale will forever be chiefly remembered for his work with The Velvet Underground, but he was playing experimental music—you know, the usual, like an 18-hour piano marathon of a piece by Erik Satie—with the likes of John Cage and La Monte Young before he joined the Velvets, and has recorded in a mad variety of styles since then. I’m loath to call any one a genius, because I prefer to reserve the title for myself, but for John Cale I’ll make an exception. He’s put out many an amazing and influential record—and produced just as many for other artists—and you never know what he’ll do next.

Take Paris 1919. The LPs that bookend it—namely 1974’s harder rocking Fear and 1971’s more experimental and classically-oriented The Academy in Peril—don’t bear the slightest resemblance to Paris 1919, or to one another for that matter. I love both albums for their unpredictability, but most people, myself included, consider Paris 1919 Cale’s masterpiece. The reason why is simple—it’s chockablock with sublime and lovely songs that you’re guaranteed to fall in love with, just as I did.

Cale may have quit The Velvet Underground because he didn’t share Lou Reed’s ambition to become a pop star at any price, but that doesn’t mean Cale was uninterested in exploring pop’s outer suburbs. Paris 1919 is proof positive that Cale had a pop side as well—he simply dressed it up and presto, instant baroque pop. Or art rock, although I’m hesitant to describe Paris 1919 as such because the LP includes only one tune that even vaguely resembles rock, namely “Macbeth.”

Read More »

Posted in The TVD Storefront | Leave a comment

A morning mix of news for the vinyl inclined

In rotation: 8/7/20

Colorado Springs, CO | Remember Record Store Day? It’s back! Bryan Ostrow has mixed feelings about Record Store Day. As the co-founder of What’s Left — a political music zine, indie label, and newly opened record shop at 829 N. Circle Drive — he feels the annual “celebration of the culture of the independently owned record store” is becoming less about small stores and more about big record companies. …But Ostrow is also an enthusiastic vinyl collector with an undying devotion to punk, metal and hip-hop. So it’s inevitable that several Record Store Day exclusives find their way into his collection each year. “Collecting physical music is so important,” says the longtime Colorado Springs resident, who also plays guitar in Night of the Living Shred and books shows for various venues around town. “Listening to a full album the way it was meant to be played; pulling out the liner notes and reading along as you listen; it’s an important art that has been going away for a while now.”

Austin, IL | ‘Austin is where we want to be.’ Despite pandemic, looting West Side small businesses still loyal to community. On June 6, less than a week after the wave of looting swept through West Garfield Park’s Madison Street corridor, Out of the Past Records store, which has been operating at 4407 W. Madison St. since 1986, was open for business. Marie Henderson, who founded the store with her husband, Charlie Henderson, said that the store has been struggling throughout the pandemic. And while it wasn’t looted, in the month after the reopening, the business hasn’t fully rebounded to where it was pre-COVID-19. The Hendersons are among a handful of small business owners on the West Side who were interviewed about how they’ve fared since the pandemic and the death of George Floyd. Some of the entrepreneurs reported an increase in profits while others found their business model completely disrupted. The Hendersons said that at one point they owned 12 record stores throughout Chicago, but as tapes and later CDs became popular, the demand for records plummeted and they wound up consolidating their inventory into their current location.

Macon, GA | Old School Music Headquarters celebrates 50 years of music in Macon: Since 1967, owner ‘Laughing’ Lafayette Haynes has watched the world of music change from his downtown record shop. For 53 years, former radio personality “Laughing” Lafayette Haynes has watched the world of music grow from his record shop in downtown Macon. Whether through owning his shop or working as a radio disk jockey, Haynes’ life has been a large part of Macon’s evolving music scene. “It’s been amazing to see the difference that has taken place in Macon since I was a little kid,” says Haynes. The same month that he opened Old School Music, Haynes started at WIBB with “The Laughing Lafayette Show.” While hosting, Haynes became a household name interviewing stars like James Brown, The Temptations, and Fletch Stone. During his 13 years at WIBB, Haynes also helped shift the station from country music to gospel and rhythm and blues alongside ‘King Bee’ disk jockey, Hamp Swain. “People used to tell me, ‘We’d get off work just to listen to you,'” says Haynes. “When WIBB went to R&B, Black people had something to listen to, it was brand new.”

Everett, WA | Pop into this Everett pop-up store for new vinyl records: Upper Left Records will offer albums from local bands and new pressings of classic recordings. Success for Ryan Taylor and Brooks Smothers would mean a six-foot folding table and, if sales really take off, an eight-footer. The two partners recently launched Upper Left Records, a pop-up store that sells new vinyl records. “Our store is a four-foot table. We’re just going to be a little pop-up table,” Smothers said. “We’re starting small, but our goal is to grow to a six-foot and then an eight-foot table,” Smothers said. The two friends, who share a love of music, were camping with their families in June. Over a campfire, they began musing about how rare it is to find places in Everett that sell new records. “I said, ‘Let’s do a little research and see if this is viable,’” Smothers said. What they found is that recent music industry studies suggest that vinyl records are having a resurgence.

Read More »

Posted in A morning mix of news for the vinyl inclined | Leave a comment

The TVD Storefront

TVD Radar: Mort
Garson reissue series
via Sacred Bones
Records in stores 11/6

VIA PRESS RELEASE | Sacred Bones Records announce a new series of reissues from electronic music pioneer, Mort Garson featuring albums Didn’t You Hear OST (1970), Lucifer’s Black Mass (1971), Ataraxia’s The Unexplained (1975) and Music From Patch Cord Productions, a collection of rare and unreleased recordings from Garson’s archives. In addition to the four records, Sacred Bones is releasing a 2LP 45rpm audiophile edition of Garson’s legendary 1976 album Mother Earth’s Plantasia, which was re-released last year to much acclaim. All albums are out November 6.

Morton S. “Mort” Garson was a Canadian-born composer, arranger, songwriter, and pioneer of electronic music, known for his albums in the 1960s and 1970s that were among the first to feature Moog synthesizers. His best-known album is Mother Earth’s Plantasia, a 1976 Moog album designed to be played “for plants and the people who love them.” Sacred Bones has undertaken the project of giving official, licensed reissues to key releases from Mort Garson’s catalog, with the intention of bringing these bold masterpieces to a 21st century audience.

Music From Patch Cord Productions | A collection of rare and unreleased recordings from the archives of electronic music pioneer Mort Garson. The compilation plays like an ultimate Mort Garson playlist, and includes alternate takes of Plantasia tracks, music for never-aired radio advertisements, themes for science fiction films, erotic oddities, and much more from the prolific composer’s ’60s and ’70s synthesizer oeuvre. This deluxe edition includes new liner notes by Andy Beta (Pitchfork).

Read More »

Posted in The TVD Storefront | Leave a comment

The TVD Storefront

TVD Radar: L7, Smell the Magic: 30th Anniversary Edition in stores 9/18

VIA PRESS RELEASE | On Friday, September 18th, 2020, Sub Pop will release L7’s Smell the Magic: 30th Anniversary Edition, the fiery, American grunge pioneers second album.

This 30th-anniversary edition of the ‘90s underground rock classic includes all 9 songs from the album, remastered and available together on vinyl for the first time ever! A multitude of rock music scenes populated the expanse of Los Angeles in 1989: hardcore punk, industrial goth, roots rock, and Sunset Strip hair metal, to name a few. L7 fit into none of them, creating their own unique blend of punk and hard, hooky rock loaded with humor and cultural commentary. Originally released in 1990, Smell the Magic is a landmark of ’90s feminist rock.

Smell the Magic: 30th Anniversary Edition is now available for preorder from Sub Pop. LP preorders through megamart.subpop.com and select retailers in North America will receive the limited Loser edition on clear with high melt orange, blue, and gray vinyl. Meanwhile preorders through select retailers in the UK and Europe will receive the Loser edition on neon orange vinyl.

A multitude of rock music scenes populated the expanse of Los Angeles in 1989: hardcore punk, industrial goth, roots rock, and Sunset Strip hair metal to name a few. L7 fit into none of them. Guitarist-vocalists Donita Sparks and Suzi Gardner, bassist-vocalist Jennifer Finch, and newly added drummer Dee Plakas were creating their own unique blend of punk and hard hooky rock, with humor and cultural commentary along for the ride.

But making a mark on the LA underground rock scene was more challenging than it seemed. Originating out of art punk circles in 1985, L7 played countless poetry readings, drag shows, art happenings and punk rock dive bars. They were nothing short of perseverant.

Read More »

Posted in The TVD Storefront | Leave a comment

The TVD Storefront

Madison Olds,
The TVD First Date

“Music was so much more fragile and coveted when it was just in a tangible form. There was fear of scratching a CD you worked hard to pay for, or unraveling a cassette, or even breaking a vinyl. You would display your rack of CDs or frame your vinyl, like there was a certain pride in the music you listened to. I think that’s why to this day there is so much support of tangible records and why it will never fully die. There is a certain nostalgia to holding a record somebody worked so hard for, not just a link. It’s where music and sound meet body and soul.”

“Growing up, my Aunt had this beautiful farm about 45 minutes out of my hometown, and in one of her rooms, she had this red record player and stacks of records she had collected over the years. I used to love to just pick a random one, put it on, and dance until it stopped, beg my mom to flip it for me, and then dance again. It was great, and at that age I didn’t really realise how special records and vinyl were and still are, obviously.

As I grew up, I listened to lots of cassettes and CDs as my dad had this incredible collection of them in our basement. Great bands like Deee-Lite, Pat Metheny, Salt-N-Pepa, Enya, and Art of Noise. I got cultured by lots of bangin’ ’90s records and artists. By the time I became a young adult around 15, my dad opened the door into the ’80s for me and that was a game changer. I was the only kid requesting Tears for Fears and Bowie at parties. When Spotify kind of started to take over, I got into a lot of ’80s groups as Spotify basically did all of the work for me. I’d listen to Howard Jones, and there it was “Fans also like… Thompson Twins, Wang Chung, Berlin, and Flock of Seagulls.”

Read More »

Posted in The TVD Storefront | Leave a comment
  • SUPPORTING YOUR LOCAL INDIE SHOPS SINCE 2007


  • Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text
  • Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text Alternative Text