A morning mix of news for the vinyl inclined

In rotation: 8/21/19

North Carolina has several great independent record stores: …North Carolina has a long tradition of folk and old-time music in Appalachia and the Piedmont, but the state also has a proud alternative music history. It played a huge part in the first rumblings of independent music in the South. Link Wray, who practically invented the power chord and guitar feedback with “Rumble,” was born in Dunn, N.C. Chapel Hill and Winston-Salem, which were breeding grounds for bands like Superchunk and the dBs, have been notable purveyors of the DIY sound since the ‘80s. The roots of alternative music can still be found in the state’s venues, labels, and independent record stores. These vinyl shops are still alive and well in the streaming era, and they remain cornerstones of North Carolina’s cultural landscape. A record store is a great place to shop for new music, get recommendations from knowledgeable staff, and engage with the local music scene. If you’re looking for something new or old to spin, point your feet in the direction of one of these stores.

Seattle, WA | And the Best Record Store in Seattle Is… …As someone who’s been frequenting record shops since the Carter administration, I obviously champion their cause. Sure, shopping for records online can be rewarding and streaming songs can be convenient and weightless/waitless, but the experience of rifling through bins in a brick-and-mortar emporium remains the gold standard of music consumption. Your chance encounters with other patrons, your interactions with clerks (who are not nearly as annoying as pop-culture depictions would lead you to believe; on the contrary, some are downright oracular—and full of kindness, to boot), your ability to check out the condition of the goods with your own damn eyes—all of these factors add up to a real-ass analog experience that’s more fun and vital than clicking an icon on a screen in your home. At their best, record shops are sources of aural pleasure that could last a lifetime and sanctuaries from the world’s bullshit.

New York, NY | The Pain of Losing a Local Record Store: Saying goodbye to a beloved brick and mortar business hurts. My friend Charles told me that June Records would be closing a few hours before the news was made public on the store’s website. June’s building was sold, and the new landlord was terminating the shop’s lease at the end of July. Ever since I spotted the sale sign in late April, I’d had a sinking feeling that this was where things were headed, but the shock of hearing that it was finally coming to pass was immediately replaced by a distinct feeling of sadness. “Damn it,” I told Charles. “That just sucks.” June Records wasn’t the oldest record store in Toronto, the largest or its best known. It was a small place, and opened only in 2012. But it meant the world to me for several reasons: it was a block from my house; the selection was eclectic and sweeping; the prices were fair; and its staff members were the kind of knowledgeable, highly opinionated music geeks that possessed a soulful recognition engine more powerful than any algorithm.

Lost Highway

Rome, NY | Vintage record store opens in village: This past July, Lost Hi-Way Records, a vintage vinyl record store opened in Clinton, featuring several genres of long-playing 33&1/2 vinyl albums to choose from, along with antique books, CDs and DVDs. Located at 32 College St., behind the Subway sandwich shop, store owner Mike Zombek of Deansboro said he hopes to provide entertainment choices not just to the older generation of the 70s and 80s, but to young listeners as well. He’s just trying to offer people something new and unique. “I grew up in Deansboro, spent a lot of time in Clinton,” Zombek said. “And I felt the retail area [of the village] could use a little variety beyond the average gift shop. This has turned into a very hot market right now, so this space became available, I knew the owners and decided to give it a go.” Zombek, who owns the store with his wife, Alicia, said she’s really the brains of the operation. “I’m more acquisitions and inventory and she’s design and administrative,” he said. “She’s also been wonderful with her moral support, I truly couldn’t have gotten to this point without her.”

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TVD Washington, DC

TVD Live Shots:
Bryan Ferry and
Femme Schmidt at
the Anthem, 8/13

Bryan Ferry’s North American Tour landed at DC’s premier waterfront venue, The Anthem last week for what turned out to be a stunning performance from the prolific songwriter behind Roxy Music. 

After being inducted into the Rock n’ Roll Hall of Fame with his much adored band in December of 2018, it’s no wonder that Bryan Ferry is on tour. This run of shows is being billed as Ferry “performing songs from Avalon, his solo work, and Roxy Music” and the tour definitely leans heavily on Ferry’s Roxy days, except for his unique covers of Bob Dylan’s “Just Like Tom Thumb’s Blues” (from Ferry’s 2007 release Dylanesque) and “Let’s Stick Together,” from 1976’s release of the same name, as the final song of the evening.

Ferry’s setlist did include the mega-hits: “The Space Between,” “Don’t Stop the Dance,” “Love is the Drug,” “More Than This,” and of course, “Avalon.” His performance was stellar—as to be expected—but for this show his band sounded particularly good. In fact, the best I’ve ever heard them. The bass was crisp and the melodies shined the way they do on the recordings. The sound engineer deserves kudos for balancing volume and tone and The Anthem’s acoustics shined brightly as well.

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The TVD Storefront

TVD Radar: Big Star,
In Space translucent
blue vinyl reissue in stores 10/25

VIA PRESS RELEASE | Vinyl edition to be available on translucent blue with printed inner sleeve with liner notes from original album contributors and the surviving band members.

Big Star formed in 1971, and in its brief four years together, created three albums that consistently make “Best of All-Time” lists. Eighteen years after officially disbanding, original members Alex Chilton and Jody Stephens joined forces with the Posies’ Jon Auer and Ken Stringfellow for a live performance, which led to a tour (documented on Omnivore Recordings’ Live in Memphis), and years of concerts. While the live shows were a joy and surprise, a bigger surprise happened in 2005, after more than a decade playing together: a new studio album. As Ryko A&R’s Jeff Rougvie said, “It was the easiest approval for a project I ever got.”

In Space featured new 12 tracks (10 originals and a cover of The Olympics’ “Mine Exclusively” and French baroque composer Georg Muffat’s “Aria, Largo”) recorded where Big Star began, at the classic Ardent Studios. The new lineup was creating a new chapter for the band while honoring its past.

With original albums going for outrageous prices, In Space returns as an LP on translucent blue vinyl, and expanded CD with six bonus tracks including “Hot Thing” (previously available on the out-of-print Big Star Story) and five previously unissued demos and alternate mixes. Packaging contains liner notes from Rougvie, original album co-producer/engineer Jeff Powell (who also cut the new vinyl), assistant Ardent engineer Adam Hill, and surviving band members Jon Auer, Ken Stringfellow, and Jody Stephens.

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The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve:
The Animals,
The Animals

In addition to The Beatles and Stones, the British Invasion produced numerous other noteworthy groups, and one of the most successful was The Animals. A serious-minded bunch led by that brawny-throated student of American blues and early rock ‘n’ roll Eric Burdon, they persist in the modern memory mainly for their hit singles. But on the subject of albums, they also had a few very good ones, though differing US and UK editions have frustrated collectors on both sides of the Atlantic for years. Of the two versions of their 1964 debut The Animals, the Brit issue may not be the best, but it does give a deep glimpse into what this no-nonsense, solidly rocking band was initially all about.

Eric Burdon seems like the kind of cat who’d rather keel over dead than quit singing. Nearly fifty years after his first album came out he’s still out there doing it on stages, and like the R&B legends that provided him with his formative inspiration, his continued activity comes without a whole lot of pomp and circumstance. Because he played an enjoyably quirky role in the landslide of ‘60s psychedelic rock by fronting a later incarnation of The Animals and proceeded from that to get his fingers nice and funky on a pair of albums in collaboration with the California groove merchants War, Burdon’s profile has easily transcended the outfit that began in Newcastle upon Tyne in 1962, when he joined up with a group then called The Alan Price Rhythm and Blues Combo.

In addition to Burdon and organist/keyboardist Price, the other members were Hilton Valentine on guitar, John Steel on drums, and Bryan “Chas” Chandler on bass. Rechristened as The Animals and following the advice of Yardbirds’ manager Giorgio Gomelsky, who obviously saw something in the band’s early stage act that was comparable to the act under his supervision, they moved to London and quickly hit the big time.

Along with some minor rumblings in the US, their first single “Baby Let Me Take You Home” landed at #15 on the UK charts, and deservedly so, for it’s a good one. Though credited to writers Wes Ferrell and Bert Burns (the latter notable for penning such ‘60s warhorses as “Twist and Shout,” “Hang on Sloopy,” and “Here Comes the Night” by fellow Brit Invasion figures Them) it’s basically a rough retooling of the trad folk number “Baby Let Me Follow You Down,” then popular for its version on Bob Dylan’s debut LP (as borrowed by the unjustly obscure folk personality Eric Von Schmidt.)

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TVD UK

UK Artist of the Week: Glossii

Get ready to rock as emerging quartet Glossii take over as UK Artist of The Week, and they’re taking no prisoners in the process.

Their latest single “Watching Me” is a raucous slice of alternative rock that is snarling with attitude from the offset. Hard to pin down to one genre, Glossii combine post-punk, grunge, and feedback-laden indie-rock to create their unashamedly thunderous sound.

Frontwoman Sofia Zanghirella’s powerfully distinctive vocal is instantly reminiscent of Garbage’s Shirley Manson as she emits dark femme fatale verve by the bucket load. Talking about the single, the band elaborate, “‘Watching Me’ is about growing up and going against the rules that parents tell you and want you to abide by.”

Having recently performed as part of NME’s newly appointed Girls To the Front programme, it’s clear that Glossii are going from strength to strength. Also proud members of the LGBTQ+ scene, it seems Glossii are exactly what we need right now in a world of political turmoil.

“Watching Me” is in stores now.

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The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve:
Redd Kross,
Beyond the Door

Led by siblings Jeff and Steven McDonald, Redd Kross is a byproduct of the original Los Angeles punk scene. Having been through myriad changes and periods of inactivity across the decades since, that they are releasing quality music in 2019 is a circumstance worth celebrating. That is to say, the McDonald’s latest is a beacon of inspired punk-edged pop-rocking, a record brought to fruition with guitarist Jason Shapiro and Melvins drummer Dale Crover (this duo part of the recording process for the first time). A tidy and consistent slab of muscular catchiness, Beyond the Door is out digitally, on CD in a 4-panel digipak, and on black or opaque purple vinyl August 23 through Merge Records of Durham, NC.

Researching the Blues, which marked a return to activity for Redd Kross, was one of 2012’s most pleasant surprises. ‘twas such because the band didn’t exactly cease operations on a high note in the ’90s (though I do rate ’96’s Show World, their third and final album before the long break, as their best of the decade). And let us face it; by 2012 the brothers were frankly getting up there in years, and while this 48-year old doesn’t want to come off as ageist, older folks dishing out shit-hot rock ‘n’ roll is still very much the exception and not the norm.

Crover and Shapiro (who was in ’80s punk-glamsters Celebrity Skin and before that San Fran hardcore act Verbal Abuse) are no spring chickens either. As the McDonalds’ pop-rock elder status intensifies, their ability to deliver lively hard-pop hasn’t diminished, perhaps because they’ve resisted the formulaic, and not only by opening up the recording process to the current live band; it’s made plain in the promo text that Steven is more involved in the songwriting process than ever before.

Opener “The Party” underscores the collective engagement in the process as the track outlines the band’s “total commitment to having the best fucking time we can have while we’re all still here.” This might radiate vibes similar to Urge Overkill in smoking jackets with cigars and brandy snifters, but the band has resisted any impulse to direct the above mission statement into a retro-sophisto-livin’-the-high-life costume trip, and for that, I’m glad.

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A morning mix of news for the vinyl inclined

In rotation: 8/20/19

Glasgow, UK | Missing Records to launch new Glasgow city centre store this week: The iconic second-hand vinyl specialists are moving on to bigger and better things. Missing Records will swing open the doors to its brand new shop this week. As reported by Glasgow Live last month, the iconic independent record store is taking on a bigger premises. The new shop will have more stock for customers to check out, including hundreds of second hand CDs, DVDs, Vinyl and collectables, as well as new artwork in the building to continue the legacy of the popular designs seen in the Argyle Street shop. The second-hand vinyl specialists are heading back to where the music started in Oswald Street, which is the site of their original venture back in 1984. And the official opening of the new 51 Oswald Street store (next to Barrhead Travel) will be Wednesday, August 21.

Smart to make the LP disc climate friendly: Interest in the vinyl record is steadily increasing, but the material pvc is hardly environmentally friendly. Now the industry is looking for light and lantern for other materials. “We’re trying to pull our straw to the pile to save the world,” says Pedro Ferreira at Spinroad Vinyl Factory. After living a secluded existence in the 1990s and early 2000s, interest in the vinyl record is now increasing. For a period, the format was mainly kept alive by smaller indie companies and dance music producers, but today more and more new albums are released in at least a limited LP edition and even the music industry’s giants have started to take an interest in the vinyl record again. That’s good news for those who kept their vinyl collections – and for newly started vinyl factories like Spinroad in Lindome outside Gothenburg. However, the panels are made of the plastic Polyvinyl chloride (pvc), which is not very environmentally friendly. But no good alternative is currently available, according to Spinroads CEO Pedro Ferreira.

Dallas, TX | People from all over the world visit this Dallas record store: JFK aficionados get a look at a notorious phone: From London to Papua New Guinea, JFK aficionados have been traveling to Top Ten Records to get a look at a notorious phone. Top Ten Records can’t be more than 800 square feet, but somehow Dallas’ longest-running record shop has welcomed some of pop culture’s biggest names over the years. Most have to do with music, but one notable name does not. “The Jackson Five have come through and according to lore, Selena was here too. We also have a photo with the owner and Stevie Ray Vaughan,” said Lily Taylor, Top Ten Records’ operations manager…But there’s another group of people who come to Top Ten Records and many travel from across the world. They aren’t in Oak Cliff to buy a record. Instead, they’re looking for a phone. “We have the phone that Officer J.D. Tippit used before he was shot by Lee Harvey Oswald,” Mike Polk said, the former longtime owner of Top Ten Records.

These Vintage Vinyl Record Carrying Cases Will Take You Back in Time: In this day and age, all of our music is accessed online. For those who still have their vinyl records, I’m sure you remember what you kept your vinyl albums in. Some of you might currently use a storage cabinet, record shelf, display stand, record rack, or a magazine rack, but you should protect your music in a carrying case. Now, think back to the good ole days. If you had a carrying case, you were probably the DJ at all of your high school and college parties. It’s crazy now that someone just needs Bluetooth or an aux cord to be the person providing all the music at a party. If you need a place for your vinyl records, it’s time for a new LP record carrying case.

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TVD UK

TVD Live Shots: Dead Kennedys at the Electric Ballroom, 8/9

Dead Kennedys remain a force to be reckoned with, four decades on, with yet another triumphant return to London.

This time instead of two shows in a smaller venue the band opted for one night only at the legendary Electric Ballroom. The excitement around the recent release of the three-CD set, simply titled DK 40, and the jam-packed venue makes a clear statement about the sign of the times—impending doom for the climate and the political landscape—but also offers up a lesson in longevity. East Bay Ray, Klaus Flouride, D.H. Peligro, and Ron “Skip” Greer were once again in top form tearing through a blistering 75-minute set that celebrated one of punk rock’s most excellent catalogs.

It’s way, way, way past time to stop with the lazy comments, “It’s not DK without Jello,” because it is. Go see this fucking show and tell me you didn’t think it was spectacular. Skip does a brilliant job keeping the original angst of the songs while also adding a jolt of his own explosive style. I think it’s time to see the band record a new album with him as the chemistry is 100% there and the fans are ready. It’s clear that the band is open for a reunion and the ball’s in Jello’s court. While he says he’s just too busy to make it work, but we can all bet that it will happen in time, DK 40 certainly lays the groundwork while provoking the question of a new record.

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The TVD Storefront

TVD Radar: Western Stars, Springsteen’s directorial debut in theaters this Autumn

VIA PRESS RELEASE | Warner Bros. Pictures will release a cinematic film version of Bruce Springsteen’s latest album, ‘Western Stars’, worldwide, on the big screen. Longtime collaborator Thom Zimny directs together with Springsteen in his directorial debut. The announcement was made today by Toby Emmerich, Chairman Warner Bros. Pictures Group. ‘Western Stars’, which will make its world premiere at the 2019 Toronto International Film Festival, is slated for release this Autumn.

Springsteen’s first studio album in five years, ‘Western Stars’ marks a departure for the legendary singer/songwriter while still drawing on his roots. Touching on themes of love and loss, loneliness and family and the inexorable passage of time, the documentary film evokes the American West—both the mythic and the hardscrabble—weaving archival footage and Springsteen’s personal narration with song to tell the story of Western Stars. ‘Western Stars’ offers fans the world over their only opportunity to see Springsteen perform all 13 songs on the album, backed up by a band and a full orchestra, under the cathedral ceiling of his historic nearly 100-year-old barn.

Emmerich stated, “Bruce lives in the super rarified air of artists who have blazed new and important trails deep into their careers. With ‘Western Stars,’ Bruce is pivoting yet again, taking us with him on an emotional and introspective cinematic journey, looking back and looking ahead. As one of his many fans for over 40 years, I couldn’t be happier to be a rider on this train with Bruce and Thom.”

‘Western Stars’, Springsteen’s 19th studio album, has achieved global success. It has been #1 on the iTunes charts on every continent, including such countries as the U.S., the UK, Belgium, Germany, Spain, Italy, the Netherlands, Australia, India, South Africa, and all of Scandinavia, among other countries. It has also received rave reviews, with critics using words like “hauntingly brilliant,” “beguiling,” “gorgeous” and a “masterpiece.”

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The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve:
Easy Rider, OST

Today we remember actor Peter Fonda who passed away on Friday, August 16 with a look back at the soundtrack from one of his most iconic roles, Easy Rider.

After seeing Easy Rider for the first time, I wanted nothing more than to take off across America on a chopper with a tear drop gas tank emblazoned with the red, white, and blue, smoke tons of grass and gobble lots of acid, and meet a lunatic ACLU lawyer in a gold football helmet looking to turn on, tune in, and drop out. Alas, it wasn’t meant to be, as my first motorcycle ride also turned out to be my last, after losing control of the thing and crashing head-on into our next door neighbor’s barn. And nothing’s changed over the years; the last time I tried to ride a bicycle I decided to smoke a cigarette at the same time, and ended up toppling into some rat-infested shrubbery.

So Captain America I’m not. But I love the movie, which was all about freedom, man, freedom to wear your hair long and get stoned and do whatever the hell you wanted to do without kowtowing to the Man, man. Billy (Dennis Hopper) and Captain America (Peter Fonda) represented the outlaw biker life, which came without the shackles of job, home, and hearth, but carried its own risks; as the ACLU lawyer Hanson (Jack Nicholson) tells Billy and Captain America, their freedom makes the squares “dangerous. Buh, neh! Neh! Neh! Neh! Swamp!”

But the thing I love most about the world’s greatest hippie exploitation film is its soundtrack, the rights to which cost more than the film itself. It includes two great Steppenwolf tunes and one and a half Dylan tunes, both of which were performed by Roger McGuinn, and intersperses dope anthems with dismal songs of doom, in keeping with the movie’s groovier moments and lingering sense—what with homicidal rednecks and pigs everywhere—that things won’t end well for Billy, Captain America, and Hanson. (Spoiler alert! Shit, too late.) And when I talk about the soundtrack I’m not talking about the 2004 Deluxe Edition, but the one you could listen to in your groovy pad with its beaded doorways, day glo ceilings, and black light poster of Three Dog Night (okay, so you were one very unhip hippie; don’t beat yourself up about it).

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The TVD Storefront

The Lilacs,
The TVD First Date

“It’s remarkable how the music that resonates with you through the years depends at least as much on who you were when you first heard it as it does on some”objective” criteria of its quality.”

“The first record I ever owned was Barry Manilow’s Greatest Hits which I got when I was 10 in 1978. His big hit at the time was “Ready to Take a Chance Again,” which was used to great effect in the Goldie Hawn, Chevy Chase thriller Foul Play (which I also loved, by the way). So everything from “Daybreak” to “Can’t Smile Without You” to his “rocking” numbers like “Copacabana”—I loved all of it. I loved the singing. I loved the instrumentation. I loved the over-the-top sentimentality.

All of those qualities found themselves into my own work. Not that I would ever put myself in the same category either talent-wise or obviously success-wise as Barry Manilow. But man I loved that record and I wore it out, and I remember even being assigned to be the lead male dancer at my camp and the tune was the theme to American Bandstand that our choreographer had chosen and discovering that song also had been written by Barry Manilow just felt quite perfect to me.

Predictably, as I got to high school and wanted to seem cooler and probably also not get pummeled, I wasn’t as willing to publicly acknowledge how much I loved that particular genre of sappy love ballads. But secretly I still did. And then something funny happened as I entered the punk and indie-rock phases of my musical career.

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The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve: Fleetwood Mac,
Kiln House

Between their start as a standard English blues band and their apotheosis as perhaps the seventies best pop group, Fleetwood Mac wandered from style to style and sideman to sideman, and in so doing put out some very intriguing albums. 1970’s Kiln House is a fine example.

Guitarist Peter Green was out. Guitarist Jeremy Spencer was in, as was (kind of) Christine McVie, who provided backing vocals and wouldn’t be considered a full member until 1971’s Future Games. Bob Welch, Lindsey Buckingham, Stevie Nicks were all in the future.

Like the other LPs Fleetwood Mac would release during their middle period, Kiln House is a dizzyingly eclectic affair. You get a couple of rockabilly rave-ups, a country music parody, a very, very English folk rock instrumental, an engaging hard rocker in the vein of The Hollies’ “Long Cool Woman” (only gnarlier!), a couple of very likable folk rock ditties, and an inspired cover of “Buddy’s Song,” which is credited to Buddy Holly’s mom Ella but is basically “Peggy Sue Got Married” with new words.

Kiln House constitutes a loving backwards look at rock ’n’ roll’s past, and as such anticipated the “rock ’n’ roll revival” that would inspire albums by the likes of John Lennon, The Band, David Bowie and a whole slew of backwards-looking English glam bands.

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A morning mix of news for the vinyl inclined

In rotation: 8/19/19

Hong Kong, CH | HMV liquidation sale: massive discounts see hundreds queuing up to buy vinyl records, CDs, toys and more: Hundreds of people showed up much before the start of HMV’s liquidation sale on Thursday morning, eager to get their hands on heavily discounted items. HMV’s two-week long liquidation sale, the largest for a collapsed retailer in Hong Kong for a decade, started at 11am at W Square in Wan Chai. More than 100,000 CDs, DVDs, vinyl records, toys, iPhones and headphones are available at discounts ranging from 50 to 90 per cent. Alex Fasso, a music lover, was among the first customers who patiently waited for nearly an hour in the queue to enter the venue. “It is the last chance to look for a good bargain for vinyl and CDs at HMV,” Fasso said as he browsed some 9,000 vinyl records featuring Michael Jackson, The Beatles, Led Zeppelin, Rolling Stones and David Bowie and local stars like Denny Chan Pak-keung, Leslie Cheung Kwok-wing and Anita Mui.

London, GB | East London Is Transforming Itself Into A New Vinyl Mile: London’s Vinyl Mile is the stuff of legend. Berwick Street in Soho has long been the city’s main hub for music fans, boasting a huge number of record shops. The downturn in vinyl sales around the Millennium sadly trimmed this number, but some key outlets – Sister Ray, Sounds Of The Universe, Phonica – are still going strong across the Soho area. Over in East London, though, a new generation of retailers are fast transforming the area into a new vinyl mile. From Vinyl Pimp in Hackney Wick through to Love Vinyl on the cusp of Haggerston, Hackney can boast some of the finest vinyl outlets in the city. Thankfully, the team at Vinyl Pimp have crafted a handy map, a kind of ‘vinyl walk’ for those who want to spend a solid afternoon digging through those crates. It’s a great list, which moves from left field electronics to metal, soul, house, funk, and more.

A “priceless” 7,000-strong record collection is up for sale: The private collection is valued at close to $1 million. A self-described “1-of-a-kind” record collection has been put up for sale by an anonymous private seller. According to the press release which accompanies the sale, the owner is a music industry insider based in California. Dubbed the ‘VIP RPM’ collection, the 7,000 records include a combination of LPs, 45s and 78s, many of which remain factory sealed. The collection is also said to contain mint condition test pressings (such as The Ramones’ ‘Leaving Home’), 12” DJ-only releases, limited and unreleased material, autographed LPs, coloured vinyl and a range of music merch and memorabilia. While it is said to focus on rock from the ’60s and ’70s, it also includes are jazz, country, classical and comedy records. One particular highlight is the complete 191-record Motown Yesteryear series, the 25th anniversary catalogue of every 45 the soul label ever released.

10 Most Expensive Vinyl Records Ever Sold: The music industry might rely on streaming apps to sell, but until some decades ago, vinyl record sales were essential to defining the success of a single or a musician. Not quite obsolete, many people are still passionate about vinyl records, leading to some seriously expensive records. It is hard to believe, but some records are more expensive than a house. But what makes a vinyl copy expensive? It is not only about the quality of the music, but how rare it is. Usually, records that have a limited number can be worth some thousands and the value can increase depending on how unique it is. Details like a rare cover, a handwritten note, or even a serial number, have a strong influence on the final price. Here is a list of the most expensive vinyl records ever sold.

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TVD Los Angeles

TVD’s The Idelic Hour with Jon Sidel

Greetings from Laurel Canyon!

Said I know what it means to get left for dead, / when the saints rise up at the sound. / When the spirits don’t move in / their chains and the shoes / and the crack of the guns all around. / I know how it is to get all dressed up, / where nobody would know where to go. / With a fifth in your vest, / and some pills on your tongue / and a gun looking out across / the Valley of the Shadow below, oh…

“Another pleasant valley Sunday…” I guess so? Not every day in the San Fernando Valley is pleasant, but I like to think they are. After all, the climate is changing these days.

Back when I first moved to LA, no cool soul went to—let alone lived in— the Valley. Hey, no one cool from New York lived or went to Brooklyn either. Now I’m not the only one avoiding “going into town” for the convenience of those wide valley boulevards. When we recently had the option of enrolling Jonah into middle school in either the Valley or Silverlake we choose…

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TVD Washington, DC

TVD Live Shots: Aerosmith at MGM National Harbor, 8/10

TOP TWO IMAGES: ZACK WHITFORDAerosmith, the bad boys from Boston, brought their “Deuces are Wild” Las Vegas residency show to the MGM National Harbor in Oxon Hill, Maryland for three dates which concluded this past Tuesday.

Named after the track originally recorded for their 1989 album Pump, and not released until 1994 for The Beavis and Butt-Head Experience, the “Deuces” run includes 35 shows spread out among the MGM National Harbor in Maryland, the Borgata in Atlantic City, the MGM Springfield in Massachusetts, and finally the Park Theater in Las Vegas beginning in late September.

It’s hard to pigeonhole a band like Aerosmith. Not only has the band been a major player in the rock music scene from their inception in 1970, they practically define the genre for those of us who grew up in the ’80s and ’90s. The band up and ran with the baton passed from mega-rock predecessors like Led Zeppelin, the New York Dolls, and the Rolling Stones, and they’ve done a hell of a job reaching new audiences and a new crop of fans. Their music has definitely inspired generations, and icon status fits the band quite well.

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  • SUPPORTING YOUR LOCAL INDIE SHOPS SINCE 2007


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