TVD Los Angeles

TVD’s The Idelic Hour with Jon Sidel

Greetings from Laurel Canyon!

Fruit tree, fruit tree / No one knows you but the rain and the air. / Don’t you worry / They’ll stand and stare when you’re gone. / Fruit tree, fruit tree / Open your eyes to another year. / They’ll all know / That you were here when you’re gone.

This has likely been the coldest winter week in the thirty some odd years I’ve lived in LA. Twice this week I’ve found myself in a morning traffic jam on top of a crisp and scenic Mulholland Drive. It came clear as the morning—to be stuck on Mulholland is certainly nothing to complain about. In fact, the top of our canyon still carries the magic of plants and native Americans.

I found myself staring at trees and enjoying the simplicity of their company. Indeed, since moving to our pad in the canyon, I’ve always regarded the trees as neighborhood and friends. It’s as though this week’s cold has grown whiskers for us all.

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TVD UK

TVD Live Shots:
The Dead South and
The Hooten Hallers at the O2 Forum Kentish Town, 2/15

Canadian bluegrass punk rebels The Dead South have arrived and their moment is now. Having sold out their biggest UK tour to date, this quartet is primed to take the reins from the terribly overrated Mumford & Sons with a return to the style of the original rowdy acoustic punks, The Avett Brothers. It’s traditional, it’s edgy, the lyrics tell a great story, and you can’t help but stomp your foot and be pulled into the energy that these guys produce on stage.

Based in Regina, Saskatchewan, the band was formed in 2012 and has released two full-length albums and an EP to date. The songs “In Hell I’ll be in Good Company,” “Honey You,” “Boots,” and “Banjo Odessy” are instant classics for the genre and sound even better live than on the records.

Famed London venue the O2 Forum in Kentish Town was jam-packed with 2300 fans, the largest crowd to date for these guys, and it was a rip-roaring ride through the band’s short but celebrated catalog backed by one of the most impressive light shows I’ve seen at the venue. As these guys have just recently appeared on my radar, it became immediately apparent why the buzz and the hype around The Dead South is legit, and it will be interesting to see where the band goes next as they’ve clearly outgrown another London venue.

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The TVD Storefront

TVD Radar: Lee Moses, How Much Longer Must I Wait? Singles & Rarities 1965-1972 in stores 5/24

VIA PRESS RELEASE | Light In The Attic continues to illuminate the works of soul music “mystery man” Lee Moses on the heels of their recent reissue of his seminal (and only) LP, Time and Place.

With How Much Longer Must I Wait? Singles & Rarities 1965-1972, the label presents a collection of material pre-dating 1971’s Time and Place, reflecting Moses’ initial bid for stardom via a series of now-legendary 45s recorded with Atlanta producer Johnny Brantley. This definitive package collects all of Lee Moses’ non-album singles and B-sides, including the Southern soul smash “Bad Girl” (both versions), plus three previously unreleased tracks together in one package for the first time ever.

The release appears on Light In The Attic’s Future Days Recordings imprint, which is a nod to songs born ahead of their time. As for the unreleased Lee Moses recordings – much like the man himself, little is known about them. What remains is an oeuvre that has become synonymous with raw and emotionally charged Southern soul. While we may never know all we wish we knew about the man behind the music, but with How Much Longer Must I Wait? we can finally complete the picture of his work. Essential listening for anyone with a heart.

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The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve:
The Monkees,
The Best of the Monkees

Today we remember The Monkees’ Peter Tork who passed away yesterday, February 21, with a look back from our archives.Ed.

The kids in my 6th grade class didn’t give a shit about The Beatles; we were Monkees fans through and through. The Beatles, well… The Beatles were for fucking old people, and who gives a shit about old people? We had our own squabbles (Mickey’s No. 1!) and rumor mill (Davy’s dead!) and preferred Dr. Pepper to Sgt. Pepper anyway. My older brother never tired of playing the thing; it was fucking boring! And what did he know anyway? He was, like, 16 and practically dead!

And all these years later I’ll still take the Pre-Fab Four over the Fab Four any day. My heart doesn’t go pitter patter when I hear “Penny Lane,” but it skips a beat every time I hear “Daydream Believer” or “Valleri.” What do I care if The Monkees were the product of big Hollywood and that boring homunculus Don Kirshner? The truth is I kinda like Don Kirshner; his impossibly monotone and utterly banal introductions of bands on Don Kirshner’s Rock Concert bordered on Andy Kaufman-school performance art, and provided me with some of my biggest laffs during the seventies.

Sure, the Monkees were created in a test tube in a laboratory by the suspiciously named Raybert Productions, and sure they were hardly allowed to play their own instruments on their own albums (hell, for a long time they couldn’t play ‘em!), but when push comes to shove it’s all about the songs, man, which now that I think of it were outsourced to the likes of Boyce and Hart and Neil Diamond and Goffin and King, but who cares? The kids in my 6th grade class knew something our boring elders/Beatles’ fans didn’t know; namely, that The Monkees were communicating with us DIRECTLY through the televisions in our living rooms, and the televisions in our living rooms were omnipotent!

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The TVD Storefront

JD Simo,
The TVD First Date

“I’m JD Simo and I’m a vinyl junkie.”

“I mostly scour bins for old blues, R & B, and funk records, but I also have a fondness for mono garage rock and psychedelia from the 1960s. Because I travel constantly, one of my favorite pastimes is hitting my favorite spots while on tour to see what I can score. For several years I didn’t travel with a record player and that led to constant frustration. I’d score a mint Excello Records Slim Harpo King Bee and not be able to enjoy it till I was home. Needless to say, it didn’t take long for me to find a funky old unit. My cherished mid 60s GE is my constant companion.

There are several favorite spots I have around the world, most notably Grimey’s in my hometown of Nashville, Amoeba in San Francisco, Reckless Records in Chicago, and my favorite, Antone’s Record Shop in Austin, TX.

Antone’s was opened in the 1980’s by the grandaddy of the Austin music scene, Clifford Antone. His history as a blues fanatic and champion of the underdog is widely known and luckily a decade after his death, his legendary nightclub and cherished record store are still going strong thanks to a dedicated staff and supportive local community.

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The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve:
Deer Tick,
Divine Providence

Hey, how about we forget about this stupid review and go get trashed instead? Yeah, yeah, yeah, drinking to excess is bad for your moral fiber and could even land you in the rooms of Alcoholics Anonymous or in an El Camino wrapped around a utility pole (like me!), but sometimes you just gotta go off like a human roman candle or die a little inside, ya know?

And it’s this wild hair up yr ass, this impulse to just go off the rails and to hell with the consequences, this itch that you just GOTTA scratch that Deer Tick captures so wonderfully on 2011’s divinely raucous Divine Providence. The LP title’s a salute to the band’s Rhode Island hometown; the contents therein include some of the most barbaric yawps and calls to get shitfaced this side of Gang Green’s “Alcohol” or the Dictators’ damn near definitive “Weekend.”

Divine Providence is by no means a perfect album; the first four songs are drop dead great, near perfect actually, but after that it’s hit or miss if only because the party mostly peters out and Deer Tick is reduced to pure songcraft, the problem with that being that a couple of these songs sound suspiciously like songs by other bands.

Deer Tick’s owe a heavy debt to the Replacements, and on “Main Street” they don’t even try to hide it. And I can’t listen to “Chevy Express” (what a waste of a great title!) without hearing Spoon. Meanwhile, “Make Believe” is a bizarro homage (or should I make that wholesale swipe?) of Neil Young’s “Like a Hurricane,” right down to its human cannonball guitar riff and opening lines (compare “I saw you dancing through the window” to “Once I thought I saw you/In a crowded hazy bar/Dancing on the light/From star to star”), with a touch of Spoon tossed in for flavoring.

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A morning mix of news for the vinyl inclined

In rotation: 2/22/19

Washington, DC | Skip Groff, record store owner who presided over a D.C. punk paradise, dies at 70: “…Sometimes you go into a record store, and the person behind the counter makes you feel like you have trespassed,” said MacKaye, who co-founded Dischord Records and led bands including Minor Threat and Fugazi. “And sometimes the owner, or the person behind the counter, makes you feel like he was wondering what took you so long. I put Skip in the latter.” Mr. Groff maintained a wide selection of country and western rarities, rock and new-wave classics, obscure metal singles from Britain and Canada, and a smattering of Top 40 hits. He had initially planned to specialize in late-’60s rock and psychedelia, but his focus shifted with the rise of punk rock in England, which Mr. Groff visited several times each year to buy records. “When you start selling 15 to 20 Buzzcocks or X-Ray Spex records and one Beatles record, your ideas get changed around pretty quickly…”

Washington, DC | ‘Skip, we love you’: Remembering a pillar of D.C.’s punk scene: My father took me there first. I was 11 years old when we visited Yesterday & Today Records, an inauspicious storefront tucked on the side of the Sunshine Square shopping center in Rockville, Md. A music-loving kid, I’d haunted plenty of record stores at the mall, but when my Dad and I walked into Yesterday & Today, I could tell that it was a different creature. The store was bursting with thousands of LPs and singles, its walls adorned with faded posters and other ephemera. Crate-diggers sifted through bins of rare records — a bounty of rock-and-roll, but also loads of jazz, R&B, and more — with prices handwritten on big orange stickers. The store’s owner, Skip, effortlessly dispensed knowledge about his inventory to customers as if he were feeding koi. They looked to him expectantly, waiting for advice on what obscure, limited-edition vinyl gem they should try next. It was my first proper record-store experience. And Skip Groff was at the center of it.

Vinyl Sales Grow 500% In 5 Years: It’s been said over the last few years that vinyl is making a come back. As music becomes more digitized and accessible, there are some who argue it loses its individuality. And apparently there is some truth to their opinion- at least on the market side of the music industry. According to DJ Mag, “research conducted alongside online record shop Norman Records” confirms a 500% jump in vinyl record sales since 2013. Whether this resurgence in vinyl is due to many individuals’ discerning taste in music or just the hype over vinyl is uncertain. But one thing is. There’s never been a better time for vinyl salesmen or die-hard old school vinyl heads. The ability to have practically any track pressed at the drop of a dime is undoubtedly helping as well!

Tampa Bay, FL | Rock Out: Record time. Surely you’ve heard the news that Daddy Kool Records is moving off downtown St. Pete’s 600 block, so why not help lighten their load at their sidewalk sale on Saturday? You’ll find tons of used LPs, CDs, old concert posters, books, magazines and other music-related stuff. They’ll have another sale on March 23, just ahead of their closing on March 31. The store reopens in the new location in the Warehouse Arts District (2430 Terminal Drive S) on April 13, which is Record Store Day. Noon to 5 p.m. Saturday at 666 Central Ave. daddykool.com. Make a day of it and head over to Planet Retro Records’ St. Pete Punk Rock Flea Market. The curated indie flea will feature instruments, posters, books, ‘zines, collectibles, vintage clothing, decor and toys and art. It’s a family- and pet-friendly party with live music and DJs, food (vegan, too!) and drinks. Noon to 5 p.m. at 226 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. St. N. planetretrorecords.com.

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TVD Washington, DC

TVD Live Shots: Interpol and Sunflower Bean at The Anthem, 2/15

Touring in support of their current album Marauder, Interpol made The Anthem their DC stop on this leg of their US tour and brought along with them the exuberant trio Sunflower Bean.

Sunflower Bean kicked things off both steady and sharp with punctuated guitar riffs in an ode to all things rock while fitting the evening’s bill perfectly. Front woman Julia Cumming’s bright and silky vocals paired nicely with the crisp tones emanating from Nick Kivlen’s guitar. The band’s newest release, Twentytwo in Blue on NYC’s Mom+Pop label is an addictively good listen as well.

When Interpol took the stage the venue was given a whole new persona. The disco ball that hung center stage become alive with white beams of light against a blue room. Singer Paul Banks seemed to subtlety hang over the crowd in the front row as well as the band opened with older selections “Pioneer to the Falls,” and “C’mere,” before they moved to the newer track, “If You Really Love Nothing.”

Interpol sounded wonderful from top to bottom. The band seemed revitalized delivering their new material, but ironically their set list consisted of mostly earlier songs with only a few tracks from Marauder. However, I was happy to hear their new single “The Rover” live, and also “All the Rage Back Home” from 2014’s El Pintor.

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The TVD Storefront

TVD Radar: Mr. Good
Boy Record Cart and Japan’s Rare Groove partner for vinyl pop-
up in LA, 3/2–3/17

VIA PRESS RELEASE | The first-of-its-kind traveling vinyl pop-up store and music discovery hub, the Mr. Good Boy Record Cart, has teamed up with Record Shop Rare Groove (Osaka, Japan) and owner/DJ Norio Sato for an unprecedented celebration of Japan’s vinyl culture hosted by high-end Japanese-inspired home goods and lifestyle store, The Good Liver (Arts District, Downtown Los Angeles).

The Record Cart will anchor the two-week long event and will offer for sale a hand-curated selection of original Japanese Funk, Ambient, and City-Pop albums from the collection of Norio Sato and Rare Groove Osaka. These albums are highly prized by collectors, DJs, and music aficionados and are rarely ever seen in the United States. Some of the artists whose album will be available for purchase during the event will be Y.M.O., Tatsuro Yamashita, Toshiki Kadomatsu, Akira Ito, Yumi Arai, and more.

The program will run from March 2-17, with a full slate of events set to compliment the album offerings, including: Saturday, March 2: In-store DJ set by Norio Sato (Rare Groove, Osaka) and special guests, Sunday, March 10: Album pairing and tea tasting program, and Sunday, March 17: Closing party.

About Mr. Good Boy Record Cart | Created by co-founders Carson Lere and Ryan Wilson, the Record Cart is a hand-crafted product of Los Angeles creative marketing house, American Dekotora, Inc. With its onboard turntable and four individual headphone listening stations, it serves as a real-world music discovery hub and allows consumers to browse its four onboard vinyl bins for fresh finds to purchase or audition on site. The Record Cart was recently featured as the centerpiece of a two-month Pop-Up at Best Made Co. Los Angeles in collaboration with storied reissue label and distribution company, Light In The Attic.

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The TVD Storefront

TVD Vinyl Giveaway: Green Book OST

If you’re keeping a scorecard for Oscars 2019, you no doubt know that Green Book is a heavy hitter this year with nominations for Best Picture, Best Lead Actor for Viggo Mortensen, Best Supporting Actor for Mahershala Ali, Best Original Screenplay, Best in Film Editing—and its official soundtrack just surpassed 1 million streams globally. And for those of you thinking, “Hey, that’s a great achievement, but what about the vinyl soundtrack?” …we’ve got you covered.

The official soundtrack from the award-winning motion picture Green Book has surpassed 1 million streams globally, marking it the highest streamed jazz soundtrack released by Milan Records. The soundtrack, featuring an original score by composer Kris Bowers, has seen a steady increase in daily streams, from roughly 10,000 streams per day in January 2019 to now closer to 20,000 streams per day.

Milan Records says of the achievement, “It’s been a hugely rewarding process to work on the soundtrack album with Kris Bowers and his team, Manish Raval, Tom Wolfe, and Paul Katz. Kris’ score is remarkable and stands proudly as the work of a born virtuoso. It also has had no trouble connecting with music streaming audiences, contrary to conventional wisdom surrounding the marriage of jazz and music streaming. With more than 650,000 streams to date, Kris’s music is getting the attention it so rightfully deserves and is receiving by far the highest number of streams of any of our jazz-infused soundtrack albums. We look forward to seeing what Kris does next!”

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The TVD Storefront

Emmeline,
The TVD First Date

“Puff the Magic Dragon may live by the sea, but he also lived in my family’s record player.”

“With the mere press of a button and the whoosh of spinning vinyl, “Puff the Magic Dragon” would spring from the speakers, inviting me to frolic in the autumn mist of a land called Honahlee. My name wasn’t Jackie Paper, but I was eager to share with Puff whatever strings and sealing wax I could find. (Fun fact: As a young music fan, I thought the lyric was “sealy wax.” I was convinced that “sealy wax” took the form of a special candle made only by seals, and I searched in every Eckerd for one worthy of Puff.)

I understood that the family record player was the secret to bringing Puff the Magic Dragon out to play. I knew that one of the knobs on the record player’s face summoned my favorite seaside rascal. I just didn’t know which one.

One day, fifteen-month-old me pushed myself up onto my stubby little legs, marched awkwardly over to the silent record player, and hit ‘play.’ When the sweet melody of my musical friend began to echo throughout the living room, I was so pleased that I began fiddling with more buttons. Suddenly, the volume increased to terrifying levels, and I clapped my hands over my ears and started to cry. “Too loud!” I wailed, feeling betrayed by my favorite dragon friend. Didn’t he understand the idea of “inside voices?”

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The TVD Record Store Club

Graded on a Curve: New in Stores for February 2019, Part Three

Part three of the TVD Record Store Club’s look at the new and reissued releases—and more—presently in stores for February, 2019. Part one is here and part two is here.

REISSUE/ARCHIVAL PICKS: X, Los Angeles (Fat Possum) The first full-length and one of the cornerstone LPs in LA punk, its music hasn’t aged a bit as it provides a glorious barrage of lessons on how to seamlessly integrate aspects of earlier root forms into the punk equation without weakening or betraying a thing. There are sharp but exquisite harmonies, elements from C&W, even more from rockabilly and early R&R, an expansion of the instrumental landscape to include keyboards, and even a brief plunge into the indigenous LA sound from a generation prior through a wonderful transformation of The Doors’ “Soul Kitchen.” Billy Zoom’s guitar is suitably crunchy, the rhythmic foundation is hefty but lithe, and I can’t think of a better male-female rock vocal duo than John Doe and Exene. This is it. A+

Algebra Mothers, “Strawberry Cheesecake” b/w “Modern Noise” 7” (Third Man) Back in September, I gave a pick of the week and a grade of B+ to A-Moms = Algebra Mothers, Third Man’s archival collection of previously unissued material by these Detroit punks, noting that a repress of this 45, their sole prior released output, was forthcoming. Well, here it is. In September I called this baby superb, but that was based on memory. After getting reacquainted, I stand by that statement, but will confess that it’s not quite the double-sided monster that I recalled. I also said it was arty-wavy, and I really stand by that, and will elaborate that it’s a bit like Devo meets the Voidoids, though don’t go thinking it maximizes that description. Bottom line, this is an affordable way to own a worthwhile punk-era obscurity. A-

Brownie McGhee & Sonny Terry, Sing (Smithsonian-Folkways) Guitarist McGhee and harmonica ace Terry (usually credited the other way around) recorded a ton, predominantly because their folk-blues recipe had just the right measurements of authenticity and accessibility. I haven’t heard all their LPs (not even close), but I haven’t heard a flat-out bad one, though obviously some are better than others (a few have struck me as uninspired, understandable given the prolificacy). This, their first for Folkways from ’58 with drummer Gene Moore on board, is one of the best. Cut not long after the duo were co-leading an R&B band that knocked out sides for a variety of labels, traces of this activity can still be heard, with a few tunes bringing Jimmy Reed to mind and “Old Jabo” nearer to Bo Diddley than John Hurt. A-

Dave Van Ronk, Ballads, Blues and a Spiritual (Smithsonian-Folkways) Van Ronk is one of the indispensable figures in the ’60s NYC folk scene, and on his first album from ’59 he bursts forth with a booming, raw voice, fleet fingers and nary a trace of the tentative. Although the man’s rep has endured, his popularity was always limited, partly because he was more of a blues singer and songster than a protest folkie (though a solid lefty all the way). His singing style, gravelly and clearly derived from (some have said downright imitative of) African-American blues singers, was once considered controversial, but it steers far clear of minstrelsy and has held up well, mainly because of conviction; he felt it was the natural (and proper) way to tackle the material (and so, I disagree that he’s mimicking). A-

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A morning mix of news for the vinyl inclined

In rotation: 2/21/19

Washington, DC | Remembering DC Music Legend Skip Groff: A local musician looks back on his time as an employee—and customer—of Groff’s record store Yesterday and Today. A trip to Yesterday and Today Records was nothing short of a pilgrimage for a teenage suburban music fan like me in 1983. Two Ride On buses and a short hike up Rockville Pike got me from my family’s house in Kensington to a cramped storefront in a strip mall behind the Entenmann’s outlet, across from Heavenly Ham. In this unlikely location, amid the sprawl, sat an oasis filled with tens of thousands of records: LPs and a massive selection of 7” 45s—punk records, pop records, hit records, obscure records. At the center of the chaos, surrounded by these records he loved so much, was owner Skip Groff, who died Monday at age 70. He is survived by his wife Kelly and daughter Kirsty, named for British pop singer Kirsty MacColl. As my band Velocity Girl was getting started in the early 1990s I worked at the store on and off for a couple years. Skip had a profound impact on me as a musician, and I am glad to have been his friend.

Orlando, FL | Brothers, Jazz Cats, and Smokers: Music and Cannabis at Florida’s Foundation Records: Cool is a loose ideology, set by those who stand at its forefront. But its core can be seen inside Foundation—a small, unassuming record store that specializes in vintage clothing, vinyl, and insightful conversation with two unpretentious brothers. Located in the College Park neighborhood in Orlando, Florida, Alex and Peter Cohen have curated a spot with “cool” as its main descriptor. A lone clothing rack stands outside the storefront to entice curious passersby. Their window is slightly blocked by cassette tapes, stereos, and old toys (like a Steve Urkel doll). And if their door is open, best believe a slight fragrance of warm tobacco is wafting outside, along with the sounds of whatever psych rock or funk record Alex or Peter are gawking over for the week.

Wokingham, UK | Wokingham Town Centre’s Peach Place announces more independent businesses to open: Independent shops will be appearing at a new town centre development, promising to be a ‘home to niche businesses that will set it apart from the norm’. A bakery and tea room, vinyl record shop and a craft beer bar will be opening their doors to Peach Place, Wokingham Town Centre. Shoppers will get to enjoy a range of pastries and cakes at The Blue Orchid Bakery and Tea Room, or try a craft beer at Sit and Sip. As well as the Leafy Elephant already being announced at the towns first indepedent gin bar, residents will also get to discover their favourite vinyl at Beyond the Download record shop. Councillor Philip Mirfin, executive member for regeneration, said: “I am very pleased to welcome another three great new independents to the town.

Nottingham, UK | Historic CD and vinyl shop The Music Inn celebrates its 100th anniversary. The shop, formerly known as Papworth’s, used to be based in Alfreton Road: Whether it was on vinyl, CD or cassette, everybody remembers the first album they bought. For many people in Nottingham that piece of music would have been purchased from The Music Inn, or as it was previously known, Papworth’s, in Alfreton Road. The company has witnessed for itself the decline in physical music sales over the last few years but unlike many of its competitors has weathered the storm. Today, owner David Rose is able to take stock of his family-run firm, now based in the West End Arcade, as the company celebrates its 100th anniversary. He said: “Its marvellous to have that continuation of history. “I get people coming in every week saying ‘I remember buying this off your dad’ and that sort of thing. It is a wonderful thing to have and there can’t be too many businesses that can say that. It’s lovely to have this shared history.”

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The TVD Storefront

TVD Radar: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, The Best Of Everything
in stores 3/1

VIA PRESS RELEASE | Throughout his storied career, Tom Petty did everything with authenticity—putting the music and his fans first. It is this sentiment that Petty sings about in the poignant and autobiographical song “For Real.”

“For Real” is featured on Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers: The Best Of Everything, due March 1 via Geffen Records/UMe as a supplement to last year’s critically lauded, career-spanning box set An American Treasure. The Best Of Everything was born from Petty’s long-term desire to release what he believed to be his greatest hits and strongest material across his four decades of songwriting.

Petty’s family and band-mates rallied together once again to fulfill his dream. Rather than chronological order, the special cross-label collection was sequenced as a hard-hitting playlist giving the entire catalog equal prominence, including songs from his solo projects, songs with world-class musicians The Heartbreakers, as well as essentials from the reformed Mudcrutch.

The Best of Everything will be released simultaneously as a 2-disc CD featuring deluxe packaging, LP editions in both black and clear vinyl, and in all digital formats. The 38-track set also includes an additional previously unreleased song: an alternate version of the title track, which restores a never-before heard second verse to the song that was originally recorded for the Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers’ 1985 album, Southern Accents. 

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The TVD Storefront

TVD Radar: Little Steven and the Disciples of Soul, Soulfire Live! 7LP box set in stores now

VIA PRESS RELEASE | A rousing document of the legendary rock n’ roller’s first world tour in nearly two decades, Little Steven and the Disciples of Soul have released two new exciting collections today, allowing fans to relive the sensational live shows or to experience them for the first time. Titled SOULFIRE LIVE! after the vaunted 2017 tour of the same name, the live album is available as both a 7LP vinyl box set and as a two-disc Blu-ray video via Wicked Cool Records/UMe. 

Comprised of the best performances from the North American and European concerts, the collections feature Little Steven aka Steven Van Zandt and his 15-strong band taking listeners through a musical history lesson as they blast through an arsenal of songs spanning rock, pop, soul, blues, funk, doo-wop, reggae and everything in between. Nearly every song from his 2016 album SOULFIRE is represented along with inspired covers and classic tracks from his early catalog. The sets each culminate with “Macca To Mecca!,” a 12-song tribute to The Beatles that kicks off with a riveting performance of “I Saw Her Standing There” recorded at The Roundhouse in London with a special appearance by Paul McCartney.

It is followed by an extraordinary surprise set at Liverpool’s legendary Cavern Club recorded November 2017 during the band’s sold out European tour. The intimate lunchtime gig is filled with rocking renditions of “Magical Mystery Tour,” “Good Morning, Good Morning,” “Got To Get You Into My Life,” and “All You Need Is Love,” alongside iconic songs famously performed by the nascent Fab Four, including “Boys” (originally by The Shirelles), “Slow Down” (by Larry Williams), and “Soldier Of Love” (first recorded by Arthur Alexander).

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  • SUPPORTING YOUR LOCAL INDIE SHOPS SINCE 2007


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