A morning mix of news for the vinyl inclined

In rotation: 8/16/18

Sleep’s “Leagues Beneath” Is Coming to Vinyl via Third Man Records: For Sleep fans, the big news about the legendary stoner metal band this year was obviously the surprise 4/20 release of their long-awaited fourth album The Sciences. But that wasn’t their only recent new music: in May, they also digitally released a single called “Leagues Beneath,” a behemoth jam that has since become a staple of their live sets. This being Sleep, “Leagues Beneath” is long enough to be an EP unto itself, and now that’s exactly what’s happening: the nearly 17-minute track will be released as a 12″ vinyl single via Jack White’s Third Man Records, the same label that issued The Sciences. The record will be available in both aquamarine and standard black vinyl, both of which will feature “a tentacled aquanaut nightmare etching” on the B-Side.

The National are releasing a rare vinyl of early live tracks for fan club members. The limited edition release is called ‘Cherry Tree Vol. 1’ The National will release a rare vinyl of early live tracks but only their fan club members will be able to get their hands on it. Titled, ‘Cherry Tree Vol. 1’ the release consists of early-era live performances, including ‘All the Wine,’ ‘Lucky You,’ and ‘Murder Me Rachel.’ Sharing the news on their Twitter account, the band added that it would be “shipping later this year to all Cherry Tree members.” See that tweet below, which also shows off the artwork for the release.According to the Cherry Tree website, members of the fan club get Exclusive content, exclusive and limited edition merchandise, priority ticketing and an annual collectible vinyl, which is included in the membership.

Stereolab Announce Switched On Vinyl Reissue Series. Their 1990s compilations have been remastered: Stereolab have announced they are reissuing their Switched On compilation albums. All three collections—1992’s Switched On, 1995’s Refried Ectoplasm [Switched On Volume 2], and 1998’s * Aluminum Tunes [Switched On Volume 3]*—have been remastered and will be released on vinyl and CD, with the LP editions to be pressed on clear vinyl. The CD boxset will feature all three compilations “in individual card wallets plus an insert.” Refried Ectoplasm and Aluminum Tunes will also be released on streaming services for the first time. The reissues arrive September 28 via the band’s Duophonic UHF Disks label.

A comprehensive guide to turntable weights, clamps and stabilisers: As any audiophile will tell you, several factors affect our perception of sound quality during record playback. One of these is the stability of the record. There are a variety of accessories designed to help stabilise records, the most common of which are weights, clamps and, occasionally, periphery rings. While many feel these accessories ‘lift’ the sound, tightening frequencies across the spectrum and subduing any resonance that may occur as the needle tracks the groove of an unsecured record, others feel that they can place unnecessary strain on belts and bearings, producing results too fine to appreciate.

Hero Breaks Car Window to Save Vinyl Records on Hot Day: Local hero and vinyl enthusiast Nate Adams broke a car window in last week’s triple-digit temperatures in order to save some records overheating in the backseat, according to multiple witnesses. Adams allegedly noticed the neglected crate of vinyl in the 2005 Suzuki Aerio after leaving an ice cream shop Saturday afternoon. Knowing the dangers, he quickly took action. “It was, like, 100 degrees,” said Adams. “Vinyl can get warped at, like, 80 degrees, and it will never sound the same again. I knew I had to do something. So, I picked up a rock and threw it through the window. I just did what any other vinyl lover would do.” …Bystanders report Adams stayed with the records until authorities arrived on the scene.

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TVD Washington, DC

Save the Date: The
DC Record Fair returns
to U Street Music Hall, Sunday 9/16!

Back in its 9th year is Washington, DC’s twice yearly record rummage, The DC Record Fair, which sets up for an almost Fall edition at U Street Music Hall on Sunday, September 16, 2018.

At this event we’ll have vinyl vendors from up and down the East Coast, the anticipated DJ line up, the bar, the food, raffle items up for grabs just for coming through the door, and much more that make the DC Record Fair a special community event. 

A little while back our friends at the Fillmore Silver Spring assembled the above feature that connects all the dots to the day—hit play.

Mark your calendars! 
THE DC RECORD FAIR

Sunday, September 16, 2018 at U Street Music Hall, 1115 U Street, NW, Washington, DC.
11:00–12:00: Early entry $5.00
12:00–5:00: Regular admission $2.00

RSVP and follow via the Facebook invite!

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The TVD Storefront

TVD Radar: Jeff Tweedy, Let’s Go (So We Can Get Back) in stores 11/13

VIA PRESS RELEASE | The singer, guitarist, and songwriter, best known for this work with Wilco, opens up about his past, his songs, the music, and the people that have inspired him.

Few bands have inspired as much devotion as the Chicago rock band Wilco, and it’s thanks, in large part, to the band’s singer, songwriter, and guiding light: Jeff Tweedy. But while his songs and music have been endlessly discussed and analyzed, Jeff has rarely talked so directly about himself, his life, and his artistic process. Until now.

In his long-awaited memoir, Jeff will tell stories about his childhood in Belleville, Illinois; the St. Louis record store, rock clubs, and live-music circuit that sparked his songwriting and performing career; and the Chicago scene that brought it all together. He’ll also talk in-depth about his collaborators in Uncle Tupelo, Wilco, and more; and write lovingly about his parents, wife Sue, and sons, Spencer and Sam.

Honest, funny, and disarming, Tweedy’s memoir will bring readers inside both his life and his musical process, illuminating his singular genius and sharing his story, voice, and perspective for the first time.

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The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve:
Lou Reed and Metallica,
Lulu

Lou Reed was so full of shit in his lifetime it was impossible to ever take a word he said seriously, so when he said of this unlikely 2011 collaboration with Metallica that it was “the best thing ever done by anybody,” it was easy to write it off as just more empty punk braggadocio by the guy who invented empty punk braggadocio.

And it was even easier to write off given that said collaboration, Lulu, is regularly featured on worst-ever album lists and received a largely hostile response from everybody from Pitchfork (who gave it a damning 1.0 out of 10) to noted rock critic Chuck Klosterman who wrote, “If the Red Hot Chili Peppers acoustically covered the 12 worst Primus songs for Starbucks, it would still be (slightly) better than this.”

Me, I gave it a cursory listen when it was released and promptly filed it under S for Suck. But something called me back–Lou, whom I love and hate, is always calling me back–and I’ll be damned if this much derided collaboration doesn’t have more than its fair share of alternately brutal, tender, cold-blooded, and yes even majestic moments.

Sure, most of the songs on this “concept album”–which returns us to the scene of 1973’s equally controversial Berlin–go on far too long, and both Reed and the boys in Metallica go out of their way to pummel normal human eardrums into cowering submission (just check out the hammering and unrelenting “The View,” on which Lou actually bellows). And it’s definitely not for fans of “Melodic Lou,” who opted to stay home during these proceedings.

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TVD Washington, DC

Play Something Good with John Foster

The Vinyl District’s Play Something Good is a weekly radio show broadcast from Washington, DC.

Featuring a mix of songs from today to the 00s/90s/80s/70s/60s and giving you liberal doses of indie, psych, dub, post punk, americana, shoegaze, and a few genres we haven’t even thought up clever names for just yet. The only rule is that the music has to be good. Pretty simple.

Hosted by John Foster, world-renowned designer and author (and occasional record label A+R man), don’t be surprised to hear quick excursions and interviews on album packaging, food, books, and general nonsense about the music industry, as he gets you from Jamie xx to Liquid Liquid and from Courtney Barnett to The Replacements. The only thing you can be sure of is that he will never ever play Mac DeMarco. Never. Ever.

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The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve:
Mako Sica/Hamid Drake, Ronda

When jazz meets rock in the form of collaboration, the results are often well-intentioned and admirable but ultimately inessential. This is not the case with Ronda, which finds the expansive Chicago rock trio Mako Sica syncing up with the great percussionist Hamid Drake across four sides of vinyl. While Drake has extensive experience in jazz’s avant-free zone, the music here gravitates toward the gist of Mako Sica’s bag; amid an approach that’s reliably psychedelic, but with sharper than the average musicality, there are wordless vocals, guitar, occasional horns, and beaucoup rhythm. Intensity does build, but it’s with subtlety and gracefulness of interaction. It’s out now in an edition of 500 through Feeding Tube.

Mako Sica have been described as free-rock, but also desert rock, and the latter is a nice entry point into the sound offered on Ronda. Formed in 2007 by multi-instrumentalists Przemyslaw Drazek and Michael Kendrick (both formerly of the band Rope, who issued a couple of albums in the ’00s on Family Vineyard) plus Brent Fuscaldo, they don’t really specialize in freaking, spazzing, or even skronking.

However, they do like to drift and go deep, and can get heavy without underlining it. Through an ample discography including 2009’s Mayday at Strobe, the next year’s Dual Horizon, 2012’s Essence and last year’s Invocation (all LPs augmented by some cassette action and a split 12-inch with Zelienople), they can deftly inhabit established rock modes and make ‘em feel exciting rather than trite. Prior to the recording of the Renewal tape in 2015, Kendrick exited and Chaetan Newell joined, and so the lineup’s been since.

If Mako Sica’s output is plentiful, that’s in rock terms; compared to their partner in Ronda Hamid Drake, it’s tiny. This is standard for jazz, but what’s not so typical is the breadth of Drake’s recorded work both as an ensemble player and leader. Born in Monroe, LA, like Mako Sica, Drake is a resident of Chicago, first hitting record in the groups of the late saxophonist Fred Anderson, though he gets around so much that it might be better to describe him as a citizen of the world.

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A morning mix of news for the vinyl inclined

In rotation: 8/15/18

Edwardsville, IL | Edwardsville going on the record: New shop will feature music on vinyl, cassettes. When the Trusty Chords Record Store opens this fall it will be the first Edwardsville store since the ‘90s that buys and sells vinyl records, CDs and cassettes. The owners’ intent is to have the new store open by the second weekend in November. It will be located in the breezeway of the Montclaire Shopping Center on Troy Road. In recent days, though, the interior has been gutted and Anderson says that when the new store opens, customers will see new and used vinyl, CDs, turntables and turntable accessories, and even a few cassettes. Cassettes, he says, have caught on with a new generation of listeners, despite obvious flaws in the format that sometimes drove earlier users to distraction.

Brighton, UK | Record enthusiasts hunt for bargains at vinyl fair: Music lovers flocked to a record fair to add more vinyl to their personal collections. The event was held at Komedia, in Gardner Street, Brighton, yesterday. Vinyl enthusiasts were busily hunting for bargains and a chance to discover new albums. Brighton Record Fair attracted buyers from all age groups, proving again that the vinyl revolution is gaining momentum. Maria Godden, 43, from Telscombe Cliffs, said: “My son and I came specially for this record fair. “I was just browsing around, hoping to find something really good. I’ve just started collecting vinyl because of the good quality. I really love music. So far I have 20 records and I want to collect as much as I can.”

Keighley, UK | Central place for your soul music: Central Soul will hold its first regular session of the autumn season at Central Hall, Alice Street, on Saturday, August 18 from 8pm to 1pm. DJs from Cross Hills and Lancashire will play the best in 60s and 70s soul including Motown and Northern soul, using original vinyl records. There is a large main dance hall and a bar and chill room. Organiser David Shackleton said the club held a successful night at the Octagon, in Sandbeds, last month, featuring two live artists. Next month Central Soul will host a reunion for former regulars at the Buffs RAOB Club, which ran during the 1970s at the bottom of Spring Gardens Lane in Keighley.

Tokyo, JP | The world’s best record shops #119: Universounds, Tokyo: Tokyo has no shortage of amazing record shops but in amongst the towering skylines, arcades and walkways of Japan’s capital, it’s easy to be distracted from your record diggings. But if you only have time for a handful of stores on your holidays, then make sure Universounds is near the top of your list. Owned by Yusuke Ogawa and found a five minute walk from Koenji Station, Universounds is a beacon for particularly evasive funk, soul, disco and jazz records – or rare grooves, to use the native tongue. It’s a sampler’s delight, so much so that names like DJ Marky have been found rifling through the racks for alien breaks to chop and screw.

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The TVD Storefront

TVD Radar: Ace Of Cups’ debut LP in stores 11/9

VIA PRESS RELEASE | The first studio release by the only all-female rock band of the late ‘60s San Francisco scene: Features contributions from Bob Weir (Grateful Dead, Dead & Company), Jorma Kaukonen and Jack Casady (Jefferson Airplane, Hot Tuna), Taj Mahal, Buffy Sainte-Marie, Peter Coyote, and many more.

Ace Of Cups, the beloved all-female rock group from the 1960s San Francisco psychedelic scene, will release their self-titled debut studio album on November 9th via High Moon Records. Produced by Dan Shea (Jennifer Lopez, Mariah Carey, Santana), the record’s twenty-one tracks span fifty years of brilliant songwriting. From 1967 to 1972, Ace Of Cups—Mary Gannon (Bass), Marla Hunt (Organ, Piano), Denise Kaufman (Guitar, Harmonica), Mary Ellen Simpson (Lead Guitar), and Diane Vitalich (Drums)—were at the epicenter of the ‘60s cultural and social revolution.

From the Acid Tests to the protests, from the free concerts in Golden Gate Park to the ballrooms of San Francisco, they shared stages with everyone from The Band to the Grateful Dead. Michael Bloomfield, Jerry Garcia, and Buddy Miles were their fans and the Ace were chosen to open for Jimi Hendrix the week after his groundbreaking performance at The Monterey Pop Festival. When asked by Melody Maker magazine to name his favorite musical discoveries on his U.S. trip, the Ace Of Cups was the first thing he mentioned.

“I heard some groovy sounds last time in the States, like this girl group, Ace Of Cups, who write their own songs and the lead guitarist is hell, really great.”Jimi Hendrix, 1967

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The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve:
Close Lobsters, Firestation Towers:
1986-1989

Sound reads from the archives, all summer long.Ed.

The currently active Scottish act Close Lobsters emerged in the guts of the 1980s as one of the earliest signings to Fire Records. Said label is also still in existence and having a boffo 2015, with part of their continued success stemming from due attention to back catalog. To elaborate, Firestation Towers: 1986-1989 is Fire’s expansive assemblage of Close Lobsters’ initial output, matching two full-lengths with a singles collection. Copies of the Record Store Day 3LP remain available and the CD edition is out September 18th.

Close Lobsters formed in 1985 with Andrew Burnett on vocals, Tom Donnelly and Graeme Wilmington on guitars, Andrew’s brother Robert on bass, and Stewart McFayden on drums. The next year they earned a spot on C86, the movement-defining comp issued by the weekly UK periodical New Musical Express.

“Firestation Towers” is the track, a sub-two minute spurt of urgent jangle and slightly lethargic voice landing squarely within the parameters of what constitutes the C86 sound. Quickly signed to Fire, the two sides of their debut ’86 single, “Going to Heaven to see if it Rains” and “Boys and Girls,” possessed a level of energy certain indie pop associates lacked and evidenced substantial writing ability. 1987 was a fertile period. The “Never Seen Before” EP’s title cut sports Postcard-style chime swagger with complementary bouncing bass notes and on 12-inch includes “Firestation Towers” and “Wide Waterways,” the latter a shrewd cover of a song by Peter Perrett’s Velvet Underground-infused pre-Only Ones band England’s Glory.

A deal with Enigma broadened their fan base through US college radio. First album Foxheads Stalk this Land opens with the copious string glisten, lively bass, lithe drumming, and enhancing brogue of “Just Too Bloody Stupid,” while “Sewer Pipe Dream” is vibrantly poppy as the two guitar attack pays dividends. From there, “I Kiss the Flower in Bloom” offers glistening mid-tempo melodicism, its aura contrasting with the torrid echo-laden bottom end and hyperactive riffing of “Pathetique,” a number moderately reminiscent of C86 cohorts The Wedding Present.

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TVD UK

UK Artist of the Week: Nick Wilson

Wow, what a voice. Young singer/songwriter Nick Wilson proves he’s definitely an artist to watch with his latest single “Get Up,” and we absolutely love it.

Combining elements of folk and electronica, “Get Up” is a truly mesmerizing single from the offset. Wilson’s incredible vocal range is second to none, full of raw emotion and an incredibly powerful falsetto that will both astound and amaze upon first listen. “Get Up” is one of those songs that will get stuck in your head for all the right reasons.

The sweeping electronics alongside the gentle strum of the guitar fit together perfectly and Wilson’s captivating voice soaring over the melody is undeniably addictive. Talking about the track, Wilson explains “I guess it acts as an inspirational kick up the back side. It’s so easy to dwell and stay stuck in a feeling of helplessness, but it’s almost always easier than you think to dig yourself out of that hole, you just have to try.”

Wilson has already supported the likes of Gabrielle Aplin and Martin Luke Brown, as well as gaining a staggering 400,000 monthly Spotify listeners. We’re not quite sure how as we’re only just discovering Wilson, but we’re extremely excited to see what he gets up to next.

“Get Up” is in stores now.

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The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve:
Alice Coltrane,
Lord of Lords

The resurgence of interest and the increase in esteem for the work of Alice Coltrane is an unambiguously sweet thing, but it’s also not an especially new development, as her reputation’s been on the steady upswing for quite a while now. However, the first-time vinyl reissue of the pianist-organist-harpist-arranger’s 1972 LP Lord of Lords is a recent turn of events, and it sounds better than ever. Featuring bassist Charlie Haden, drummer Ben Riley, and a 25-piece orchestra, the record is the third in a trilogy that established Coltrane as a spiritually questing and musically trailblazing American original. It’s out now through Superior Viaduct.

For decades, the seven albums in a roughly five-year stretch that Alice Coltrane made for the Impulse label were essentially rated (by those with a favorable disposition to her work, anyway) as the crowning achievement of her recording career. Opinions unsurprisingly differed over which of her releases was the strongest, but it was almost certain the array of choices would derive from 1968-’72.

That is, until last year, with the arrival of World Spiritual Classics Volume I: The Ecstatic Music of Alice Coltrane Turiyasangitananda, a collection of recordings she made in the ’80s after leaving the commercial biz and establishing the Sai Anantam Ashram. Initially distributed in small cassette runs to the members of her spiritual community, Luaka Bop’s collection is a revelatory hour of material that while not usurping the primacy of her Impulse period in my personal esteem, does stand head and shoulders with it in terms of quality and sui generis verve.

Such was the fervent response to World Spiritual Classics I that no doubt many disagree and consider it to be Coltrane’s finest work. And who knows, maybe in a year or five I’ll be swayed into concurring with that line of thought. I say this not as a platitude but as a preface to relating how my esteem for Lord of Lords has grown since I evaluated it as worthwhile and occasionally superb but, in the end, a little lesser than 1971’s Universal Consciousness.

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A morning mix of news for the vinyl inclined

In rotation: 8/14/18

Kingston, ON | Kingston store owner feeling the love: Brian Lipsin says he is stunned and touched by the love he’s received from the Kingston community this past week. Ever since a flood at his store, Brian’s Record Option, last Saturday, Kingston‘s favourite record store owner has been inundated with messages of support and donations of money and items to keep his store going. A GoFundMe campaign has raised more than $10,000 in one week for Lipsin, and local venues are hosting benefit concerts on his behalf. Private citizens are donating records to help him re-stock and hundreds of comments posted online outline the personal stories of why Brian’s Record Option is so important to the people who have visited there in the past nearly four decades. “It’s been utterly amazing. I feel like I’m a rock star who doesn’t know how to play the guitar,” Lipsin said on Saturday, exactly one week to the hour after he locked his flooded shop, feeling overwhelmed at the potential damage and unsure whether he would be able to reopen.

Wieden+Kennedy Give Life To Vinyl Records In AR: Media that appeals to more than three senses can increase brand impact and engagement by more than 70% (Martin Lindstrom, 2017). We’re seeing an increase in multisensory campaigns that stimulate multiple senses – including this new initiative from Wieden & Kennedy Amsterdam that brings the vinyl experience to life via augmented reality (AR). Listeners can pull up the ad agency’s AR app Lava, and view virtual moving ‘sculptures’ emerging from the record as it spins on the turntable. The first album to utilise the app is the debut from Dutch band Necessary Explosion. The sculptures react and adapt as you move around them, and the app also works with Spotify and Apple Music. In a statement, Anita Fontaine and Geoffrey Lillemon, creative directors of W&K Amsterdam’s Department of New Realities, described the app as “the future digital vinyl sleeve“. They added: “We see this approach as a new emerging genre for lots of artists, one which can open up new possibilities for all kinds of AR music experiences.”

Post Malone Is Dropping A Vinyl Version Of Beerbongs & Bentleys: The vinyl crackle sound is an essential part of a collectors’ pleasurable experience, like a serpentine belt tucked beneath a muscle car. Post Malone of people, grew up listening to vinyl records passed on by his father Rich Post, a locally respected disc jockey in the Grapevine, Texas area. Records like Motley Crue, Bon Jovi, Twisted Sister, AC/DC, Prince, Bruce Springsteen, Duran Duran and Billy Idol were the basis for Post Malone’s earliest childhood memories. Even the record Post Malone surpassed on the All-Time R&B charts, Michael Jackson’s Thriller, was in partly to blame for the CD boom, but only when it re-entered the market as a reissue, unlike 8-track recording technology which is virtually non-adaptable, and with good reason. The distinguishable vinyl crackle is the elusive demarcation of an unclear technology, but those who know it consummately, sing its praises

League Of Gentlemen release vinyl collection. BBC-owned record label Demon has announced a deluxe League Of Gentlemen vinyl box set. The 12-disc collection promises both the soundtrack to the entire original 3 series of TV sitcom The League Of Gentlemen, plus their earlier radio show, On The Town With The League Of Gentlemen. Issued on brightly coloured, heavyweight vinyl discs, the limited edition set will be released on 2nd November and costs £139.99. Orders are now being taken on an exclusive, dedicated website: alocalshop.co.uk The set, titled Special Stuff – The League Of Gentlemen’s Vinyl Cuts, is named and styled in homage to Royston Vasey’s master butcher Hilary Briss. The Gents – Mark Gatiss, Jeremy Dyson, Reece Shearsmith and Steve Pemberton – have collaborated with the company and artist Graham Humphreys to create the collection, which also includes an exclusive photo print signed by the four men, and brand new sleeve notes also written by them.

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TVD San Francisco

TVD Live Shots: Weezer, Pixies, and Sleigh Bells
at the Shoreline, 8/7

Weezer

One of the hottest summer tours is the odd mash-up of two alternative rock bands that have somehow managed to sell oodles of tickets after decades in the business. Weezer and Pixies are those two bands and they hit up Mountain View, California’s Shoreline Amphitheatre on a balmy Tuesday night with Sleigh Bells in tow.

Pixies frontman Black Francis stepped onto the stage while sipping from a blue mug, gloriously unimpressed with the massive crowd in front of him. The band was set up by the backline and glowered at the crowd as “Gouge Away” thumped on. Spartan and raw yet incredibly polished, the Pixies focused on the rock and laid it all out there during their 60+ minute set. Sure they played before Weezer but they no doubt were worthy of that co-headlining slot.

Pixies

Where the Pixies kept things bare-boned, Weezer swung the pendulum to the other end of the spectrum with maximum camp value. The black curtain which had been hoisted across the stage as the crew went about swapping the set dropped during the Happy Days intro to find the band queued and ready to rock in a mockup of Arnold’s Drive-in. Not surprisingly, the set kicked off with “Buddy Holly.”

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The TVD Storefront

Demand it on Vinyl: Attitudes, Ain’t Love Enough: The Best of Attitudes in stores now

If you stress it, they’ll press it. —Ed.

VIA PRESS RELEASE | Attitudes, one of the most feel-good rock bands growing out of Los Angeles in the 1970s, return to the scene with Ain’t Love Enough: The Best of Attitudes from Dark Horse Records. The digital reissue Best Of album features the timeless classic “Sweet Summer Music” amongst other memorable top picks from their greatest hits. Attitudes, composed of keyboardist David Foster, drummer Jim Keltner, bass guitarist Paul Stallworth, and guitarist/lead singer Danny Kortchmar, met as session musicians while jamming at the hip Studio B at the famed Record Plant in Los Angeles.

Keltner, who was then a 15-year veteran of countless hit records, including those by George Harrison, Carly Simon, John Lennon, and Barbara Streisand, had been asked to start a jam session at the studio by Record Plant co-owner Gary Kellgren. Soon began The Jim Keltner Fan Club Hour – a club of fans and friends that would include the likes of Lennon, Paul McCartney, Mick Jagger, Joe Cocker, Jack Bruce, Stevie Wonder, and plenty more, including guitarist Danny “Kootch” Kortchmar, then known for his session work with James Taylor, Carole King and many others.

Both Kortchmar and Keltner had played on sessions for a short-lived Canadian group called Skylark, featuring a young keyboardist named David Foster—who would go on to produce GRAMMY® Award-winning albums for artists like Chicago, Andrea Bocelli, Michael Bublé and countless others. Following the disbandment of Skylark, Foster began session work around Los Angeles. Impressed with his playing, Keltner invited him to join what became known as the Fan Club jams. “David was a bad mother, man,” says Keltner. “He could play anything. And he was funky—there was nobody funkier than David Foster.” Recalls Foster, “I was just a musician who wanted to play. And you never knew who was going to show up there.”

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The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve:
The Dave Clark Five, “Try Too Hard” b/w
“All Night Long”

Sound reads from the archives, all summer long.Ed.

Of all the marquee British Invasion acts, nobody typified the concept of “singles group” more than The Dave Clark Five. Of albums they had many, but the qualities that made them a special and enduring outfit are best served by the two brief sides of a 45. During the mid-‘60s their short-players stormed both the US and UK charts with a frequency that remains impressive, and “Try Too Hard” b/w “All Night Long” from 1966 is one of their finest efforts.

While they are well-remembered today, I also suspect that few people these days would rank the Dave Clark Five as one the tiptop exemplars of the Brit Invasion, and that’s an interesting scenario because during the phenomenon’s initial wave, only The Beatles achieved a higher level of popularity. Contemplating the subject for a bit leads me to a handful of reasons for the lessening of the DC5’s status over time.

Perhaps the biggest factor is that none of the Five’s non-compilations have landed in the rock ‘n’ roll canon. I tend to think that any well-rounded, historically focused record collection is incomplete without the inclusion of Clark and company, and no doubt many others feel the same way. But I also agree with those asserting that in the run of albums they made while extant, nothing represents them better than UK Columbia’s ’66 release of the 14-track The Dave Clark Five’s Greatest Hits.

This is not to infer that the original long-players are negligible. To the contrary, ‘64’s Glad All Over and the following year’s Coast to Coast, both issued in the US by Epic, are quite good.  But starting in the mid-‘70s and continuing until 1993, none of the Dave Clark Five’s music was commercially available in any format, leaving the used bins and the radio dial as the only ways one could access their discography.

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  • SUPPORTING YOUR LOCAL INDIE SHOPS SINCE 2007


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