TVD Washington, DC

Play Something Good with John Foster

The Vinyl District’s Play Something Good is a weekly radio show broadcast from Washington, DC.

Featuring a mix of songs from today to the 00s/90s/80s/70s/60s and giving you liberal doses of indie, psych, dub, post punk, americana, shoegaze, and a few genres we haven’t even thought up clever names for just yet. The only rule is that the music has to be good. Pretty simple.

Hosted by John Foster, world-renowned designer and author (and occasional record label A+R man), don’t be surprised to hear quick excursions and interviews on album packaging, food, books, and general nonsense about the music industry, as he gets you from Jamie xx to Liquid Liquid and from Courtney Barnett to The Replacements. The only thing you can be sure of is that he will never ever play Mac DeMarco. Never. Ever.

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The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve:
Joe Strummer,
Joe Strummer 001

Vocalist, guitarist and songwriter John Graham Mellor, better known by his recording and performance handle Joe Strummer, was a co-founder of one of the most important, and in the view of some, the very finest band in UK punk rock’s original wave. That would be The Clash, but the man’s activities preceded and extended far beyond that group, and on September 28 the Ignition label spotlights the results with Joe Strummer 001 in a variety of formats: a 4LP set in slipcase, a 2CD in slipcase, a deluxe 2CD with book, and a deluxe box set containing LPs, a vinyl single, a cassette, the book, and a handful of additional goodies. Totaling 35 tracks, including a dozen unreleased, it’s a stone-cinch pickup for Strummer fans.

It can feel (and will surely be read as) contrarian to say it, but I’ve never been greatly enthusiastic over The Clash. Sure, the first two albums, ’77’s The Clash and the following year’s Give ‘Em Enough Rope, are essential, and the third, ’79’s London Calling arguably so, but when they took a nosedive in quality after that they did so with gusto, following up a double album with triple album Sandinista!, a display of excess that no matter how well-intentioned sent them into a tailspin from which they never recovered, though folks who discovered them through the rather tepid pop move Combat Rock might disagree.

The bigger problem, at least for me, was how the band came to represent what I’ll call the Springsteenization of punk rock. That is, the Clash were often, and well into the 1980s after their breakup, championed as the exception to the rule that punk rock sucked. By extension, certain folks frequently openly professed Clash-fandom as a way to prove they weren’t complete moldy figs.

Now, most of my punk-loving friends adored the Clash, and I could surely listen to them (the good stuff, anyway) without trouble; merely appreciating the group wasn’t a problem. It’s just that loving their output while deriding the Damned and Buzzcocks and the Lurkers and yes indeed the Sex Pistols (to limit myself to a short list of UK outfits) was and remains downright suspect.

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A morning mix of news for the vinyl inclined

In rotation: 9/19/18

Chicago, IL | ‘She’s an experience’: Friends celebrate the life of Oak Park record store owner Val Camilletti: Friends and associates — people who filled every corner of Val Camilletti’s life — celebrated her life Sunday afternoon and into the late evening in what many said was a memorial tribute that the longtime Oak Park record store owner would have enjoyed. Crowds of better than 250 packed FitzGerald’s in Berwyn to listen to the rock, blues and other forms of music that Camilletti relished. They sat at tables, stood or sat at the bar and propped themselves up against the walls to drink, chat and just hang out. Others watched outside on a live feed from the stage. The central focus — what Steve Parker, a longtime friend and host of the festivities, called “the experience” — was Camilletti, the owner of Val’s Halla Records, who died July 24 after a two-year battle with breast cancer.

UK | Man hears voice of uncle killed in Second World War after lost recordings found on eBay: The nephew of a naval officer who died during one of the great battles of the Second World War has been able to hear his uncle’s voice again after recordings made on British ships turned up on eBay. Robert Terence Grogan – better known as Terry Grogan – died alongside 1,415 other men when their ship was sunk by the Bismarck during the Battle of the Denmark Strait in 1941. But in the years before the war, the Royal Navy man recorded his voice onto vinyl using specialist equipment and posted the messages home. His nephew Peter Jefferson, 73, was amazed to discover the existence of the unique recordings after a historian found the rare pressings on sale for £20 on the online auction site.

San Antonio, TX | Del Bravo Record Shop has been west side staple for more than 50 years: At Del Bravo record shop off Old Highway 90, music runs deep in their roots. “My dad being a musician and loving music, he decided to open up a store, something for the family. They started the store here many years ago and we’ve been here through good and bad times,” Jay Gutierrez said. And by many years ago, Jay means 53! But it hasn’t always been easy for this true “mom and pop” business. “In 2009, with technology and the recession, it kind of hit us at the same time,” he said. With records and CDs slowly going out of style, the family relies on what they know best to keep the turn tables spinning.“We’re looking for ways to on how to survive here, so we’re starting to see an increase in vinyl sales again…”

If you hate your eyes, you can now watch video recorded on a vinyl record: …Analog video encoded on vinyl records isn’t a new concept. The experimental Phonovision format, created by John Logie Baird in the late 1920s, used gramophone records to record video, but the format never caught on. Formats like Betacam, and eventually VHS, allowed for vastly superior audio and sound…Fast forward 20 more years, and as Mat from YouTube’s Techmoan discovered, a Vienna-based company called Supersense has picked up Gebhard Sengmüller’s VinylVideo torch and is selling a roughly $200 converter box that is essentially the secret sauce to making this format work. You’ll need to provide the turntable (preferably higher-end hardware with a diamond tip stylus) and a TV, but the converter box will take the audio signal coming from a VinylVideo record, boost the signal, and split it into video plus mono audio signals.

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The TVD Storefront

Paul Stanley,
The TVD Interview

You can think of KISS, the fire-breathing long-running rock band, as a kind of performance art piece. With face-painted demons in fanciful costumes, the fire and spectacle of their arena shows set the stage for most such stadium concerts today.

Frontman Paul Stanley had a hand in creating that art, and he’s joined the handful of rockers who augment off time by taking to the easel, with colorful canvases that range from abstractions to specific band-centric self-portraits, flags, and an array of guitars.

His gallery shows draw a number of fans, of course, but also viewers who may have never heard “Love Gun.” His original paintings, mixed-media works, prints, and hand-painted sculptures often sell out, and not just because he also makes personal appearances, as he will September 21 and 22 in the Washington, DC area at the Wentworth Galleries in Bethesda and Tysons Corner.

With his voice much more subdued than it is during his famous banter on stage, Stanley, 66, talked recently over the phone about his art, his vinyl, and future Kiss tours.

What period of time does your exhibit cover?

My art shows really reflect my whole road till now. It reflects pretty much all the work that I’ve done or a significant part of it. I used to wonder if I could ever have enough art to fill a gallery, and now I have too much. But it certainly reflects quite a bit of the time.

So what is the oldest piece in it?

Probably about 18 years. Somewhere around 17-18 years.

Was art something you did from an early time?

Yeah, I didn’t paint, but I was very fortunate that my parents, both being of European stock, pretty much meant that the arts were a part of my life. In Europe my parents certainly experienced theater and museums and they brought the same to me. So those were part of my vocabulary, part of my home life.

What made you pick up the paint brush 18 years ago?

I think turmoil will either see you throwing things at the wall or finding perhaps a better outlet. And once I got tired of the first one, a friend of mine said, “You should paint.” That resonated with me even though I didn’t know how it would manifest itself, I went out and bought paints and brushes and an easels. I had no idea what I was going to do and put brush to canvas and basically was pretty much purging. It was almost stream of consciousness using color. It was an interesting way for me to depict for myself what I was felling. And over time, it just kept evolving, and it is still and will continue to evolve. My only rule for this and anything else in my life is: The only rule is no rules.

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TVD Radar: Bauhaus, 40th anniversary colored vinyl reissues in stores Fall 2018

VIA PRESS RELEASE | Celebrating the band’s 40th anniversary, Beggars Arkive is excited to announce a series of colored vinyl reissues.

Late 2018 will mark the 40th anniversary of Bauhaus. To celebrate, Beggars Arkive is reissuing records from the band’s catalog on limited edition colored vinyl. In The Flat Field and Mask will be released on October 26th. November 23rd will bring The Sky’s Gone Out and Press The Eject And Give Me The Tape, which is being pressed in the US for the first time and is exclusive to US Record Store Day Black Vinyl retailers. Also on this date, Leaving Records (a partner of Stones Throw Records) will release the band’s first recording ever, The Bela Session including three previously unreleased tracks and a remastered version of “Bela Lugosi’s Dead.” On December 7th, the Arkive series concludes with releases of Burning From The Inside and Crackle.

Formed in 1978, The legendary and hugely influential quartet hailed from Northampton, England and is composed of Peter Murphy, Daniel Ash, David J, and Kevin Haskins. The dark, dramatic music that they made, possessed far more force, variety, and playfulness than the “founding fathers of goth” tag that is always attached to them.

Bauhaus’ landmark debut album, In the Flat Field, came out towards the end of 4AD’s first eventful year. Following the plan at the time, the band then “moved upstairs” to Beggars Banquet, for whom they made three further albums before dissolving in 1983. They charted with their cover of David Bowie’s “Ziggy Stardust,” and they’ve been name checked by everyone from Nine Inch Nails, Sepultura, Janes Addiction, MGMT, Interpol, Bjork, Nirvana, and more. They remain a huge cult concern, periodically reforming to wow their legions of dedicated followers.

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Graded on a Curve: Bauhaus,
In the Flat Field

Sometimes I’m ashamed for my fellow music critics. Take their rude treatment of Bauhaus’ 1980 debut, In the Flat Field. An NME writer described the LP as “nine meaningless moans and flails bereft of even the most cursory contour of interest,” while a Sounds writer dismissed the LP for having “No songs. Just tracks (ugh). Too priggish and conceited,” before writing the LP off as “coldly conceited.”

I’m no Goth fan because I have a pulse, but I think the writers above are idiots. I will concede that In the Flat Field is cold, but I also happen to find it brilliant—one of the finest LPs of 1980. Clamorous and loud, it’s a wonderful example of the sonic possibilities of carefully controlled noise, and its wild sounds and angular riffs provide the perfect backdrop for the chilly vocals of Peter Murphy. Take “Dive.” Daniel Ash’s guitar playing and saxophone work are brilliantly crisp and menacing, the tune proceeds at a breakneck pace, and Murphy’s vocals are a marvel; he stutters, shouts, does it all. Or take LP opener “Double Dare.” It commences with some heavily fuzzed out riffs, then the drums kick in, and this is metal, people. Murphy is as his dark best, producing nonsense noises when he isn’t shouting, the rhythm section is heavy as Flipper, and what we have here is a drone rocker as good as any by No Trend.

The title cut is a racing rumble of distorted guitar, with great percussion and Murphy singing about who knows what (“black matted lace of pregnant cows”???), although the chorus is clear enough: “I do get bored, I get bored/In the flat field.” My recommendation is to ignore the lyrics about “spunge stained sheets” and hone in on Ash’s shredding sheets of guitar noise, the wonderful percussion, and Murphy’s vocals, which climb to an apocalyptic pitch while Ash’s guitar howls and howls. “A God in an Alcove” opens with some tentative guitar and Murphy sounding like he’s been gagged, before the song’s angular riff takes over. Ash’s guitar is ominous, someone joins Murphy on vocals, and together they make a wonderful noise, and then the song takes flight, 100 mph in a 55 zone. “Silly,” repeats Murphy, before the song’s close, but there’s nothing silly about the tune, which rocks.

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TVD UK

UK Artist of the Week: oh800

This week’s Artist of the Week is eccentric post-punk trio oh800. With the release of their debut album Character Building imminent, these three guys have been pulling out all the stops to make sure it gets the appreciation it deserves.

The band’s latest release from the album is the undeniably catchy “Melanin.” Filled with jangling guitars, fuzzy synth beats, and the trio’s killer harmonies throughout, this single is a sure-fire hit from the offset. Frontman Eoin Rooney’s vocal style has previously been compared to that of LCD Soundsystem’s James Murphy and we can see why, however what Rooney uniquely manages to do is write poignant lyrics alongside his colloquial phrasing to create something that is highly relatable.

Of the track, Rooney elaborates “We had the music for this song kicking around for quite a while, but the lyrics came after a young black kid was killed by a police officer in our area of London. The officer thought he swallowed a suspicious package and chased him down. You know the rest… Meanwhile on the same streets, middle class white people walk around every weekend with suspicious packages in their pockets, suspicion free. That pisses me off. So I wrote a song about it.” Well said Rooney, well said.

Character Building is in stores on 12th October 2018 via Infinite Jest Records.

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The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve:
Two Niles to Sing a Melody: The Violins
& Synths of Sudan

While the output of Ostinato Records is still small, through the guiding hand of founder Vik Sohonie the Grammy-nominated label has already unveiled a deeply researched wealth of enlightenment succinctly described by the endeavor’s mission statement: “Afrophone stories from the Atlantic to Indian Ocean.” Previously, they’ve delved into the sounds of Haiti, Cape Verde and Somalia, and in 2018 have continued to travel, with the excellent new compilation Two Niles to Sing a Melody: The Violins & Synths of Sudan Ostinato’s second release to focus on the country of the title. Available as a 3LP gatefold on 140-gram wax with a 20-page booklet and as a 2CD bookcase with 36-page booklet, it’s out now.

Ostinato isn’t one of those late-arriving cash-in-hand labels poised to simply scoop up and platter the results of others’ diligence while reclining back as the modest profits and larger plaudits roll in. No, the label’s driving force Vik Sohonie is a true world traveler holding the passion of a fan, the curiosity of an archivist, and the desire to share what he’s uncovered. To an extent, Ostinato reminds me of a cross between John Storm Roberts’ Original Music label and the info-rich approach of Smithsonian-Folkways, or more appropriate to the current moment, Atlanta GA’s Dust-to-Digital.

If you want to not just hear the music of various global cultures but understand its context, Ostinato is a still young but reliably solid resource, and Two Niles to Sing a Melody only deepens this circumstance. It documents the era in Sudan prior to the violent coup of 1989, a fertile period described by the collection’s co-compiler, Sudanese poet and actress Tamador Sheikh Eldin Gibreel as “a time for culture, writers, artists, sculptors, fine arts, the musicians, and the people in the theater.”

It was time under the rule of Gafaar Muhammad Nimeiry, who seized power in 1969. He instigated a long period of support for the arts, though it was a political maneuver that as hardline Islamists established a foothold in the mainstream, was also ended by Nimeiry; in 1983 he imposed Sharia Law in Sudan with matters only worsening after Omar Al Bashir took power in 1989 (a coup removed Nimeiry three years before).

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A morning mix of news for the vinyl inclined

In rotation: 9/18/18

Rochester, IN | BIZ BUZZ: Record Farm adding second location in Rochester. Second store will be next to The Times Theater: A record store housed next to a historic theater in Logansport will have a similar neighbor in Rochester when it opens its second location. The Record Farm, next to the State Theatre in downtown Logansport, is opening a new store at 618 Main St. in downtown Rochester next to The Times Theater. “It’s a mirror image of what we’re doing in Logansport,” said Matt Swisher, who co-owns The Record Farm with Adam Wilson. Just like with The State, The Record Farm’s Rochester location will serve as The Times’ box office. Tickets for the The State Theatre’s events will be for sale at the Rochester record store as well.

Norman, OK | Guestroom Records to celebrate 15 years: “…We are small and flexible. We don’t have a corporate ethos, so there aren’t a lot of hurdles to making a change in our stores,” Muir said. “It’s, ‘Do you wanna do this?’ ‘Yes, let’s do it.’” There’s also the vinyl resurgence, which Guestroom caught onto ahead of the curve. Billboard reported that 2017 marked vinyl sales’ 12th straight year of growth, comprising 14 percent of all physical album sales that year. While Guestroom does carry CDs, its inventory has shifted heavily in favor of vinyl records since opening, and not just the punk and indie variety that spurred the store’s creation…“When major labels figured out what independent labels were doing, more pop albums came out on vinyl all of a sudden, and there was nowhere else for people to buy them. We were the place to go if you wanted to buy a punk record; we’re now the place to go if you want to buy any record.”

Melbourne, AU | Win big at the Australian Record Fair: Part of the 2018 Melbourne International Hi-Fi Show that takes place across three great days in October, the Australian Record Fair is the only 3-day event of its type in the country. This year promises to be the fair to top all other records fairs with seller’s tables sold out in a staggering six days. If the rare and exotic vinyl, not to mention the tasty bargains are not enough, the show’s organisers and sponsors are giving you even more reasons to come along and win big. Just spend more than $50 with any vendor, and you’ll get a ticket into the daily raffle drawn in the Record Fair at the end of each day. Each day a fantastic Music Hall MMF 1.5 turntable (valued at $599 RRP each) will be up for grabs thanks to Convoy.

Philippines | The state of OPM in vinyl: We all know that vinyl records are back with a vengeance. Now, how is the Original Pilipino Music (OPM) market coping? We were able to speak to some re-sellers of OPM albums and unanimously, the most sought records from local artists are the Juan dela Cruz Band, the Dawn, and Identity Crisis in that order. Then there are a host of others: Maria Cafra, Judas, APO Hiking Society, and the Gapo compilation are also in demand. They sell for a lot of money depending on their condition. In fact, some command outrageous prices that are more than enough to make a down payment on a car. The cheapest price you will find for old records pressed in the 1970s or 1980s is P1,000. They mostly sell for a lot of money. When compact discs became all the rage in the 1990s, local record companies slowly stopped pressing music on vinyl. That is until the new millennium when indie and underground bands began producing their own material.

Sufjan Stevens to reissue ‘Songs For Christmas’ on vinyl for first time: All of the collection’s 42 tracks will be pressed in time for the holidays Sufjan Stevens has announced plans to reissue his 2006 ‘Songs for Christmas’ collection on Vinyl for the first time. The artist’s longtime record label Asthmatic Kitty revealed the plans to put out the box set on November 9th and the collection will feature all 42 songs of the original release. The tracks will be spread out over five EPs. The label have also detailed that the original package design will be included with the collection, which includes drawings created by Stevens, a painted family portrait, chord charts and lyric sheets for the tracks. Each year between 2001 and 2010, Stevens recorded Christmas tracks to give as gifts to his friends and family. ‘Songs For Christmas’ is comprised of the first five year’s worth of those tracks and was originally released in 2006.

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TVD Washington, DC

TVD Live: MC50 and
the Detroit Cobras at
the 9:30 Club, 9/11

WASHINGTON, DC – SEPTEMBER 11: MC5 (Motor City 5) performs at 930 Club in Washington, DC on September, 11 2018 during the MC50 event. (Photo by Richie Downs)

PHOTOS: RICHIE DOWNSHistory swirled around the rare booking of MC50 at the 9:30 Club Tuesday. Yes, it was the half century anniversary of the debut LP of the Motor City Five. In addition, a couple of weeks earlier had marked 50 years since the Democratic National Convention police riots in Chicago, where the MC5 served as house band amid the tear gas of Grant Park. And here they were in Washington, on the anniversary of 9/11.

Anyone expecting the lone survivor of the band to come out doddering had another thing coming. Guitarist Wayne Kramer was, if anything, at 70, the most active person in the reconstituted band, swirling and kicking his way onto the set and continuing his high energy approach to what looked to be the same stars and stripes guitar he used back in the day. He also grinned ear to ear during most of the show, as did the younger rockers surrounding him in playing the band’s classics.

WASHINGTON, DC – SEPTEMBER 11: MC5 (Motor City 5) performs at 930 Club in Washington, DC on September, 11 2018 during the MC50 event. (Photo by Richie Downs)

Chief among them was guitarist Kim Thayil of Soundgarden, touring for the first time since the death of Chris Cornell in May 2017. He largely provided solid rhythm while leaving Kramer to do his explosive originating solos. But there were several times when the two combined forces to trade off solos as on “Rocket Reducer No. 62 (Rama Lama Fa Fa Fa)” and “Borderline.” Mostly it was good to see him back in action on stage.

Billy Gould of Faith No More held down the bass, and the biggest roar all might may have been for hometown hero Brendan Canty of Fugazi on drums, slamming it out all night. But they found something special in 6-foot-7 front man Marcus Durant of the San Francisco band Zen Guerrilla, who seems to have reincarnated the very spirit of Rob Tyner, from the wild Afro to the lanky loose-jointed moves and especially the blues-tinged yowl. After Kramer was done with just about the only song he ever sang lead on, “Ramblin’ Rose,” it was Durant taking over lead vocals on the premature rush for the anthemic “Kick Out the Jams.”

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TVD Radar: The Complete Cuban Jam Sessions 5 LP Box Set
in stores 11/9

VIA PRESS RELEASE | Craft Recordings is proud to announce the release of The Complete Cuban Jam Sessions 5-LP and 5-CD box sets on November 9, 2018. Compiled here in their entirety and original format for the first time, the five volumes of Panart’s Cuban Jam Session albums were recorded over a span of almost a decade, from 1956-1964. Together these albums encapsulate a stylistic and historic panorama of Cuban music, from big band son montuno to Afro-Cuban rumba, mambo, cha-cha-chá, and country acoustic guajira music. At the same time, they attest to Cuba’s long relationship with popular American music and jazz.

Collectively these sessions feature an impressive line-up of renowned pioneers of descarga (improvised jam session), including pianist Julio Gutiérrez, tres player Niño Rivera, flautist José Fajardo, and the legendary master bassist and mambo co-creator, Israel “Cachao” López. Participating musicians include the legendary percussionist Tata Güines, trombone master Generoso Jiménez, pioneering Cuban jazz drummer Guillermo Barreto, Cachao’s brother and co-father of the mambo Orestes López, ground-breaking timbales player/drummer Walfredo de los Reyes, Sr., jazz-influenced pianist Pedro Jústiz “Peruchín”, and Cuban scat singer Francisco Fellove, among many others.

The 5-LP set includes 35 tracks on 180-gram audiophile vinyl in tip-on jackets. It offers a 28-page book featuring black-and-white archival images of the featured artists as well as extensive liner notes and musician bios in English and Spanish by award-winning Latin music writer, Cuban music specialist and box set co-producer, Judy Cantor-Navas. The 5-CD version comes packaged in mini-jacket replicas of the vinyl jackets and is supplemented by an extensive 96-page CD booklet.

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Needle Drop:
Roan Yellowthorn,
Indigo

Roan Yellowthorn release thoughtful, dream pop LP Indigo.

Roan Yellowthorn is the moniker of Jackie McLean, daughter of iconic folk and rock & roll artist Don McLean, whose deft melodic sensibilities were not lost on his indie darling offspring.

Mining a deep ’90s vein of gorgeous Lilith Fair acoustic pop, Roan Yellowthorn’s Indigo LP manages to be both charmingly retro and confessional. Hooks abound throughout the record, but McLean really breaks out on “Mark My Words” with a devilishly distorted jazz vocal that is as raw and truthful as anything her father ever sung.

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The TVD Storefront

Henry Nowhere,
The TVD First Date

“My first experience with vinyl was probably around third grade, listening to my Dad’s old Dr. Demento records. He’s the DJ that discovered Weird Al. I got a real kick out of “Flying Purple People Eater,” “Yellow Polka-Dot Bikini,” and “Camp Granada.””

“My dad’s collection was largely great bluegrass like Doc Watson, New Grass Revival, and David Grisman along with some country rock gems like The Allman Brothers’ Eat A Peach whose immensely psychedelic inner cover adorned my brothers wall for many years. My sister’s room was covered wall to wall with Beatles posters and what seemed to be every album cover of theirs. She was the cool one.

In High School my brother Jack (keyboardist for Day Wave) got turntables meant for scratching and mixing. So many funny, stoned, and ultimately embarrassing freestyles went down over that stack of breaks and beat records. The best beat I was able to make with that turntable was with a break beat and the 16 second intro track on George Benson’s album Breezin’, picked from my mom’s collection. I broke the needle while my brother was out skating one day and that was that.

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Graded on a Curve:
Hooters,
Nervous Night

Remember the Hooters? I know, I know, I wish I could forget them too. I found their meteoric, mid-eighties rise to stardom utterly depressing, and what made it worse was that I was living in Philadelphia–ground zero of the Hooters’ phenomenon–at the time.

Talk about your civic shame. Fantastic things were happening in NYC and LA and Minneapolis and just about everywhere else, really, and what did we get? Five boobs with all the edge of a safety razor. All I could do was hang my head and say thank god for the Dead Milkmen.

Guitarist Eric Bazilian and keyboardist Rob Hyman made their bones on Cyndi Lauper’s immensely fun She’s So Unusual, but the fun stopped there. When it came time to record 1985’s Nervous Night they settled for bland and, thanks to MTV, Rolling Stone (which dubbed the Hooters the best new band of 1986), and lots of record buyers willing to settle for bland, found themselves with a platinum LP on their hands. All you zombies indeed.

Earnest and anodyne, the Hooters aimed for faceless small arena rock and hit their target; first they won over the kids of Philly, then they conquered Australia. And they did it with thin gruel; Nervous Night is a lackluster collection of clunky, wannabe rousing tunes, three of them taken straight off their 1983 independent release Amore, and one of them (gak!) an Arthur Lee cover.

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A morning mix of news for the vinyl inclined

In rotation: 9/17/18

We could be looking at a new standard called “HD-Vinyl”: …The standards for the manufacture of vinyl records have served us well, but because of the rise of the CD in the 80s and 90s, none of those standards have been revised since 1978. That’s about to change. With vinyl sales into their 11th year of double-digit growth, the recording industry has decided that it’s time to bring the old manufacturing standards into the 21st century. Some new upgraded specifications are sorely needed. But like what? One term that’s being thrown around is HD-Vinyl, records created by a new laser-guided process that allegedly results in a longer-playing record with better fidelity than anything we see today. And yes, it has to be backward-compatible for turntables and styluses used today.

Washington, DC | Ira Sabin, D.C. record-store owner, founder of JazzTimes magazine, dies at 90: …In 1962, he bought out a brother-in-law who had a record store, renaming it Sabin’s Discount Records. The store, at Ninth and U streets NW, was in the heart of Washington’s thriving jazz district, within walking distance of two theaters and six jazz clubs. The shop carried one of the country’s largest collections of jazz recordings, and musicians often stopped by to shop and chat. “He seemed to attract folks and had this bon-vivant manner,” Lee Mergner, a former editor and publisher of JazzTimes, said in an interview. “In Ira’s world, people were all ‘cats’ and ‘chicks.’ He called everybody ‘baby’ and ‘man.’

Urban Legends Reissues Kurtis Blow’s Landmark Self-Titled Debut, ‘Kurtis Blow,’ On Standard & Limited Edition Gold Vinyl: Urban Legends/UMe has reissued the out-of-print debut LP by Kurtis Blow on standard black vinyl. In addition, a gold vinyl edition—inspired by “The Breaks,” which is the first Gold certified rap song—will also be released. In 1980, hip-hop found a charismatic orator who could comfortably represent the genre underneath its ever-expanding spotlight. Kurtis Blow, a young Harlem kid who studied communication in college was the perfect fit—handsome, squeaky-clean, and ready to represent the new-yet-growing landscape of rap. “The Breaks” was an early smash single that helped not only launch Blow’s career, but also positioned rap as something that could be popularized beyond the fleeting trend it was originally perceived as.

Jimi Hendrix’s ‘Electric Ladyland’ Gets 50th-Anniversary Deluxe Release Including Live SBD Of 1968 Hollywood Bowl Show: On October 16, 1968, The Jimi Hendrix Experience released their final album, Electric Ladyland. The sprawling double-LP opus proved to be the last studio album Hendrix would release before his death in 1970. The album has been lauded as one of the greatest of all time, largely because of the famously inspired, experimental state of mind that Hendrix maintained while working on the record. Now, fans can revisit Electric Ladyland and that creatively fruitful period in Jimi’s brief life from every angle with an upcoming 50th-anniversary deluxe edition package. The Electric Ladyland deluxe addition will feature outtakes, live concert recordings, a documentary on the making of the album, photo inserts, a book, and more, and is set to be released on November 9th.

Despite Streaming Revolution, Vinyl Resurgence Continues To Grow: The vinyl resurgence is showing continued growth, with vinyl album sales growing from 3.23 million to 4.1 million units from 2016 to 2017 according to the British Phonographic Industry (BPI). Five years ago Radio Facts predicted the resurgence of Vinyl and Record Player Nostalgia. The ‘experience’ that baby boomers grew up with when it came to buying records was completely lost in the CD and the digital era. In the face of the industry-revolutionizing rise of streaming, the rebirth of vinyl was an initial surprise. Speaking to Music Week, Karen Emanuel (CEO of Key Production, manufacturer of CD, DVD, and vinyl) noted “I thought we would see a plateau in vinyl before now and we haven’t. For us, the format is still growing.”

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