The TVD Storefront

TVD Radar: Logan’s
Run
OST deluxe vinyl
in stores now

VIA PRESS RELEASE | Waxwork Records proudly presents the the definitive LOGAN’S RUN Original Motion Picture Soundtrack. Available for the very first time on vinyl, the complete and expanded LOGAN’S RUN soundtrack by legendary composer Jerry Goldsmith receives the deluxe treatment from the soundtrack specialists at Waxwork Records, in close partnership with former Mondo CEO, Justin Ishmael.

Logan’s Run is a 1976 dystopian science fiction film starring Michael York, Jenny Agutter, and Farrah Fawcett that depicts a 23rd Century utopian society that beneath the surface kills everyone when they reach the age of 30. The story follows Logan 5, a “Sandman” who has been tasked with terminating those who have attempted to escape death (runners), and is now faced with termination himself as he approaches his 30th birthday.

Jerry Goldsmith’s score (Alien, The Omen, Planet Of The Apes, The ‘Burbs) mixes electronic music and sound design by usage of early modular synthesizers with classic orchestral compositions to create a futuristic landscape. This new release marks the very first time the complete score by Goldsmith will be released on vinyl.

Features include all new artwork by Martin Ansin, double 180 Gram “Palm Flower” colored vinyl with two variants to choose from (Crystal Blue/Green and Yellow or Crystal Green and Red), and deluxe packaging.

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The TVD Storefront

TVD Radar: Rare, unreleased Joe Strummer material, Joe Strummer 001 vinyl in stores 9/28

VIA PRESS RELEASE | Ignition Records is proud to announce the release of Joe Strummer 001, the first compilation to span Joe Strummer’s career outside of his recordings with The Clash. Joe Strummer 001 includes fan favorites from his recordings with the 101ers and The Mescaleros, all of his solo albums, soundtrack work, and an album of unreleased songs. Joe Strummer 001 will be released on Friday, September 28th and is available to pre-order now in all formats.

All of the formats include tracks that have never appeared anywhere before as well as new remasters. Exclusive to all formats is an album of unreleased material including an early demo of “This Is England” entitled “Czechoslovak Song/Where Is England,” a solo demo of “Letsagetabitarockin” recorded in Elgin Avenue in 1975, outtakes from Sid & Nancy featuring Mick Jones, and unreleased songs “Rose Of Erin,” the biographical and mythical recording “The Cool Impossible,” and “London Is Burning,” one of the last songs Joe recorded.

Punk pioneer, singer, songwriter, recording artist, activist, musical and political inspiration for a generation, and mighty diamond, Joe Strummer was the most charismatic and passionate frontman to emerge from the punk explosion of the late seventies. After Joe’s untimely death in December 2002 it was discovered that Joe had been quite an archivist of his own work, having barns full of writings and tapes stored in his back garden. There are now over 20,000 items in the Joe Strummer Archive. The archiving of this material and compiling of Joe Strummer 001 was overseen by Joe’s widow Luce and Robert Gordon McHarg III.

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The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve:
Wire, 154

Most bands are fortunate to get in the ballpark of a single masterpiece during their existence, but from ’77-’79, and right out of the gate with their debut, Wire produced three in a row. In the process, they delivered a blueprint for minimalist art-punk (from which many have swiped but never bettered) while becoming one of the defining acts in the emerging genre of post-punk. Those three records are currently available from Pinkflag as CD books, each with loads of worthy bonus material and all with written contributions from Jon Savage and Graham Duff; the standalone vinyl and bookless CDs are available July 6. Today, we conclude our coverage of these releases with thoughts on 1979’s 154.

As the final studio album before Wire’s first hiatus, 154 inevitably registers as a culmination. However, if the byproduct of chances taken, repetition disdained, and unsurprisingly, friction between band members, the album’s experimentation with and extension of rock and pop form ultimately transcends the tag of post-punk, with its contents remarkably cohesive and betraying no signs of strain from creative differences.

For an outfit who stated they’d quit because of a dearth of new ideas, 154 is loaded with them. If it’s a taste of the band at the end of their tether that you desire, then the live recording Document and Eyewitness, revised and expanded in 2014, is the release to check out; fascinatingly flawed but in this writer’s view somewhat underrated, it stands as the true end of Wire’s first period.

But don’t let’s lose track of the subject at hand. 154 easily extends the brilliance established on Wire’s prior releases by unveiling another major spurt in development, though the sheer intensity of invention did them few favors. The reality of all this rapid-fire progress? Wire was simply moving too fast to cultivate their listenership, and by extension, disappointment from their label EMI was certain. Furthermore, as their sound was at odds with the general trend toward post-punk refinement (e.g. New Romanticism), the response from critics could often be indifferent, perplexed, or even hostile.

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The TVD Storefront

Kurt Baker Combo,
The TVD First Date

“Hi, nice to see you, you are looking wonderful! Thanks for meeting here, I really enjoy this spot. There is a good ambiance here, and oh… shit, my friend Todd is working tonight! He’s gonna take care of us.”

“Well, listen, I guess I should get this out of the way first… vinyl records have followed me throughout my entire life. Each chapter of my life has its corresponding LPs. From the very beginning, I grew up with LPs around, even though I was born in the heyday of CDs. I was pretty late when it came to the CD in terms of my peers. Growing up my parents had a turntable and tape decks in their cars. My Dad used to take me up to Enterprise Records in the early ’90s on Congress Street. They had a plastic bag tacked to the wall with a bunch of broken compact discs next to a sign that read “Our CD Selection.”

Back then vinyl was so outta style that you could find original Beatles LPs in near mint condition for under $10 bucks. I still have all those LPs that my Dad bought for me—the foundation to a still growing record collection. I’d wake up at the crack of dawn and put on the White Album and listen to it on headphones. It was a true musical experience. Heck, even in high school I’d drive around in my Mom’s ’90s Chevy. No CD player, but the tape deck sounded so nice, warm, and punchy.

Especially, “Talking In Your Sleep” by the Romantics. Their album In Heat got a lot of mileage in the car, and later when we’d have parties, the LP would stay on the turntable with everybody dancin’ non-stop. Man, the record would be skippin’ all the time, but we didn’t care. It wasn’t ‘84, but ‘09. Go figure.

I guess all I’m getting at is that CDs are the worst, and I ain’t gonna miss ’em! I’ve always preferred that analog sound that came with vinyl. It’s the real thing. Yeah, I realize that people still listen to CDs, that’s why we still press them and sell them at shows, but personally, I’m a vinyl guy. Well, anyway—would you fancy a drink?

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The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve:
Hüsker Dü,
New Day Rising

Hard and fast rules so let’s dispense with the long instrumental intro and get right down to the nitty-gritty; on 1985’s New Day Rising, St. Paul, Minnesota power trio Hüsker Dü permanently set themselves apart from the hardcore pack by leavening the genre’s speed freak aesthetic with increasing dollops of real melody.

The results are still bracing, but New Day Rising is friendlier than most hardcore, and more welcoming too. Parts of it are even nice, nice in the way that the iconic album cover (two dogs, one beautiful body of water, a sunrise) is nice.

Most of the “nice” comes to us thanks to drummer/vocalist Grant Hart, who was the Jekyll to Bob Mould’s Hyde in what amounted to a schizophrenic division of band labor. Hart provided the melody, sweetness and light. Bob Mould provided the buzz saw guitar and angst; he may not have doing the fashionable by spitting bile at Reagan’s America, but his personal life sounded a hot mess. As for Greg Norton, he had a very cool mustache. And he played bass guitar.

New Day Rising is a sonic world away from Hüsker Dü’s 1982 debut Land Speed Record, a landmark in speedcore that more than lives up to its bragging title. But like their SST label mates the Minutemen and Meat Puppets, Hüsker Dü soon chafed against the formal constraints of hardcore.

Unlike said bands, however, Hüsker Dü didn’t abandon hardcore altogether. Instead they set themselves to the business of expanding hardcore’s horizons by employing catchy riffs and hooks, and the results are to be heard on such sweet (and bordering on silly) Hart-penned cuts as “Books About UFOs,” which features a piano of all things. Betcha Ian MacKaye didn’t see that one coming.

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A morning mix of news for the vinyl inclined

In rotation: 7/2/18

Tel Aviv, IL | Marching to a Different Beat: How Beatnik Records amassed an amazing collection of Israeli music records and why people are buying more record players than ever before. ‘Did you know records are made as a by-product of oil production?” asks Beatnik Records owner Guy Grinberg. “In the 1970s there was an oil crisis and the prices of oil went up. This had a bad effect on the quality of records being produced because the companies wanted to save money, so records became thinner and they began using recycled materials in the pressing of new records. In Israel, for example, they stopped laminating album covers after 1973 in an attempt to reduce costs.” Clad in a black T-shirt, long-haired and sporting gold earrings and a heart-shaped arm tattoo, Guy looks the part of a musician-turned-record shop owner. “I was in a rock band actually,” he confesses. “We were called ‘Binder and Duntat.’”

Pekin, IL | A Day in the Life Of A … Record Store Manager: While video may have killed the radio star, online music options are killing the brick and mortar music stores. In order to stay relevant and competitive, one Pekin business combines music sales with other merchandise. Co-op Records is located at 3253 Court St. in Pekin. They are open every day of the week. Their hours of operation are Monday through Thursday from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Friday and Saturday 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Sunday 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Brandon Timian, 45, is the store’s manager and said despite the store name they offer more than records. They buy, sell and trade CDs, cassette tapes and movies. Co-op also sells incense, apparel, body jewelry, golf discs, video games and vinyl records. Timian said, “If we only sold music we’d be out of business. We’ve got to be creative. I wish more people brought in used CDs and vinyl rather than throw them away.”

Seattle, WA | Easy Street Records celebrates 30 years; Clever video promotes 30% off CD Sale: Easy Street opened its store in West Seattle in 1988, and later added a cafe/bar, which serves coffee, breakfast, lunch and beer & wine. Easy Street Records often hosts live in-store performances by national and local musicians. The store carries new and used CDs, vinyl records, DVDs/BluRays, new books, magazines and company-branded merchandise. Owner/President Matt Vaughan worked at two different record stores during his teen years. In 1987, with both stores ready to go out of business simultaneously, Vaughan approached both owners and offered to consolidate the two stores into one. Vaughan opened Easy Street Records in the Junction in 1988 and the following year moved the store down the street to its current location on the primary corner of the Junction in the historic Hamm Building.

Sanborn, NY | Niagara Records is quintessential stop for music lovers: “Do what you love.” It’s not just a quote heard time and time again. For Niagara Records store owner David Ishman, it’s what prompted him to open his own record store in October 2017. Located at 5833 Buffalo St., Niagara Records offers everything a music lover could want. It currently sells vinyl and CDs spanning genres such as pop, rock, soul, bluegrass, country, blues and jazz, all neatly organized by genre. Right away, customers who walk in will gravitate toward some aisle of music looking for their next favorite album. Ishman has posters of all kinds of music legends hanging on his walls, including Fleetwood Mac and Hank Williams. Ishman is always playing music on his stereo, too, and if you tell him what your favorite kind of music is, he just might play something you’ll like. Customers can also find stereo equipment and turntables to buy, and they can sell parts of their old music collection they don’t want anymore.

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TVD Los Angeles

TVD’s The Idelic Hour with Jon Sidel

Greetings from Laurel Canyon!

We got no high times, always flat / If you go out, you don’t come back / It’s all so funny I can’t laugh / Oh, perfect day / What more to say? / Don’t need no one to tell me what I don’t already know…

Next week July 4th falls on a Wednesday, and for the life of me I can’t recall a July 4th on a Wednesday. Honestly it’s a bit disorienting.

Are we open for business? Do I “fuck off?” Or do I wait until Monday? How upside down and perfect. Here’s a set up of perfect songs to BBQ to. Enjoy it all as it’s happening…

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The TVD Storefront

Demand it on Vinyl:
Alice Coltrane, Spiritual Eternal—The Complete Warner Bros. Studio Recordings in stores 9/7

If you stress it, they’ll press it. —Ed.

VIA PRESS RELEASE | After the death of John Coltrane, Alice Coltrane embarked upon a solo career that was marked with the same uncompromising vision, spiritual probing, and formal innovation as that of her husband. Her first seven solo albums were recorded for the Impulse! label, home to John during the latter part of his career; those records, though offering more of the modal jazz with devotional overtones that Coltrane fans had come to cherish, also saw her branch out in unexpected ways, introducing new instruments (harp, Wurlitzer organ), new styles (raga, modern classical), and new approaches to recording, even incorporating classical string sections into a “free” musical environment.

By the mid-‘70s, however, time was ripe for a change. ABC, the parent label of Impulse!, was suffering from management upheaval, while the now-local Warner Bros. label—Coltrane had moved to Woodland Hills, CA to raise her family—was aggressively pursuing a number of Impulse! artists, with Alice at the top of the list. Spiritual Eternal—The Complete Warner Bros. Studio Recordings brings together, for the first time ever, the three studio albums that Alice Coltrane cut for the Warner Bros. label, albums that proved to be her final commercial recordings of the 20th century.

Though it is difficult to characterize such an eclectic and far-reaching collection of music, several things hold true throughout these three records, recorded from 1975 to 1977 with Ed Michel as producer. The first is that Alice’s instrument of choice was increasingly the Wurlitzer organ, specifically a 1971 Wurlitzer 805 Centura that included an Orbit III analog synthesizer with pitch-bending ability as one of its three manuals—a feature she used liberally and which further distinguished her sound. Coltrane credited divine guidance for her choice of the instrument; it certainly pushed her work even farther from jazz, its droning sound echoing that of the harmonium used in Eastern music.

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TVD New Orleans

Dr. Michael White’s Tricentennial Rag in stores today, 6/29

The New Orleans tricentennial has occasioned celebrations large and small across the city and the country. Surprisingly, there isn’t much new music being released to commemorate the historic occasion. So, Tricentennial Rag, the latest album from clarinetist, bandleader, and music historian Dr. Michael White is a welcome addition to both his voluminous output and the city’s festivities. After a local Jazz Fest release, the album is in stores today nationally on Basin Street Records.

All of the tunes on the new album are originals with the exception of the record’s closing song, the perennial favorite, “When the Saints Go Marching In.” The chestnut is given a treatment that takes the song back to its origins as a hymn. Longtime White sideman, trumpeter and vocalist Gregory Stafford, takes the vocal and brings the song back to the ecstasy of the black church.

Elsewhere on the album, Stafford sings another gospel-inspired original, “I Saw Jesus Standing in the Water.” But don’t think for a second that the album is filled with sacred songs, Stafford also takes the lead vocal on a new addition to the short list of modern-day Carnival originals with his vivacious take on “On Mardi Gras Day.”

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The TVD Storefront

The Davenports,
The TVD First Date

“The story of my first record is a complex one. There was, in fact, a first, that I bought personally, but then there was the collection I was already exposed to through my older brother. And it’s that collection that gets props for being so strong that it could keep my first record in its proper context.”

“The first record I ever bought was Kiss Destroyer. I loved Kiss. I was like 10 or 11. It was a great thing to have on LP (which is all there was then) because of the art–it was like having a freaking painting. That first purchase lead to a buying spree of all things Kiss–records for sure, but that right down to the Tiger Beat or Hit Parader that had one, meager, tiny black and white picture of Gene Simmons puking blood.

I would like to say that I, like many young ’70s suburbanites, was merely overcome by that perfect blend of theater and rock–taken in by the hype. But somehow, I actually loved the music as well. Listening to it now it’s sort of hard to image how you ever liked it. I mean the words are really dumb–guys singing about their love guns and such–there was a lot of bombast. But the tunes could rock and had some great pop hooks. Anyway, I loved it all at 11.

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The TVD Storefront

Graded on a Curve:
Asia, Asia

So what do we have here? Let’s see: world’s most unnecessary prog supergroup names itself after world’s largest continent, releases self-titled debut LP that subsumes worst prog instincts in attempt to score big hit singles, and ends up with No. 1 album in the U.S. in 1982. Oh, and world’s largest continent inexplicably fails to sue for slander.

Reality is so depressing. No wonder people love Roger Dean, whose fantasy-themed artwork decorates Asia’s cover. Better to meditate upon a sea-skating serpent playing fetch with a glowing orb than acknowledge that the American people sent this tepid, Prog Lite monstrosity to the top of the charts.

I had no problem with this quartet of castaways from the likes of Yes (guitarist Steve Howe and keyboardist Geoff Downes), King Crimson (lead vocalist/bassist John Wetton) and Emerson, Lake & Palmer (drummer Carl Palmer) selling out–I never much liked the precious fares said bands were hawking to begin with. It’s the popularity of Asia’s Pop Prog that I find so inexplicable. And Asia wasn’t alone; Phil Collins was successfully retooling grandiose Art Prog Vehicle Genesis into a hit-making hotrod at the same time.

But who can blame them? Dumbing down to meet the pop crowd halfway–by doing away with the album-side-long cuts, the classical influences, the complex time signatures, and the endless displays of technical virtuosity–turned out to be good commercial horse sense. Gone was Rick Wakeman in his golden cape, and in were these rags and bones merchants, who held on to the tattered trappings of progressive rock but reined in its worst impulses. No more themes from Mussorgsky or long-winded tales from topographic oceans–it’s back to the popular song!

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A morning mix of news for the vinyl inclined

In rotation: 6/29/18

Portland, OR | 10 Million Releases on Discogs! Discogs, the world’s foremost Database, Marketplace, and Community for physical music, surpasses a significant data milestone with the addition of the 10 millionth release to the Discogs Database. The user-built, open-source database, with more than 400,000 Contributors, continues the nearly 18-year mission to build the most extensive and comprehensive music Database and Marketplace in the world. In 2000, Founder and President, Kevin Lewandowski launched the Discogs Database by submitting The Persuader’s 2xLP release Stockholm followed by the launch of the Discogs Marketplace in 2003, establishing an essential resource for record collectors worldwide, and unknowingly setting a cornerstone for the vinyl revival and international cultural experiences like Record Store Day.

Cambridge, UK | Millionaire lottery winner returns to his roots with new record shop: A Haverhill man who won a £148 million jackpot is returning to his roots by re-opening a record shop in the town. Multi-millionaire Adrian Bayford landed the second biggest lottery win in British history in 2012. Bayford, 45, was selling second hand albums from a music shop when he struck lucky on the Euromillions. Eight years on from his life changing win he is opening a new branch of Black Barn Records in Haverhill. The bric-a-brac store sells everything from life-size cutouts of Hollywood legends to signed Beatles memorabilia. Bayford already owns a record store by Cambridge’s Grafton Centre with the same name, which he opened in April 2016, but his newest venture is on the same site as where he used to work.

John Coltrane’s New ‘Lost Album’ Captures a Day in the Life of His Greatest Band: Any newly discovered music from a legend on the order of John Coltrane is an event. But the reason advance buzz has been particularly feverish for Both Directions at Once: The Lost Album, a previously unissued session from March of 1963, is that it comes from the era of his so-called Classic Quartet. Simply put, the group – featuring pianist McCoy Tyner, bassist Jimmy Garrison and drummer Elvin Jones – was Coltrane’s greatest band, a unit perfectly poised between hard-edged swing and gravity-defying exploration. And here, suddenly, we have 90 minutes of excellent-sounding material from them that most never knew existed.

Jerry Goldsmith’s The Omen soundtrack released on limited white vinyl: 666 copies, naturally. The original soundtrack for 1976 horror film The Omen is being released on limited white LP, via Varase Sarabande this June. The Omen stars Gregory Peck as an American diplomat who replaces his deceased baby with an orphan whose mother died at birth. Little do they know that this seemingly innocent newborn is actually the Antichrist. Legendary American composer Jerry Goldsmith who also crafted sounds for films including Planet of the Apes, Chinatown, and LA Confidential created its Oscar winning score, which also received a best original song nomination for ‘Ave Satani’ (Hail Satan).

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TVD Washington, DC

TVD Live: The Feelies at the 9:30 Club, 6/22

PHOTO: DOUG SEYMOUR | The fast jangle and hypnotic rhythms of The Feelies is not just a warm throwback to 1980s when their first album ushered in a precise kind of frantic nerd rock, influencing a number of other bands. By now, the band is a standard-bearer for an enduring strain of New York rock. With its droning chords, flighty solos, pounding drums, and deadpan vocals, it’s the closest thing to the Velvet Underground in the 21st Century.

It’s a homage the quintet acknowledged in its splendid and generous return performance at the 9:30 Club Friday night. Two of the four covers in their series of encores were from the Velvets. And the harder rocking selections from their latest material from their 2017 album In Between forge the same heady path, particularly the title song. It was presented, as on the album, in two ways, the original and in an expanded psychedelicized version in the encores. By the end, Glenn Mercer was rubbing his guitar neck against the microphone, which you wouldn’t have expected such a reserved person to do.

Mercer is paired with the similarly bespectacled and overly reserved Bill Million, with Mercer taking on all the lead vocals and most of the lead guitar work, as Million adds the textures of his rhythmic guitar. The two barely spoke to the crowd and could scarcely bring themselves to even look up at them, despite the adoration.

To their left, Brenda Sauter began the show creating tones on guitar on the opening “When Company Comes.” She became a third percussionist late in the show, hitting a standing tom. But mostly she played bass, sang some harmonies, and acted like Earth translator for the rest of the front line, saying thanks from time to time. “You make us feel so welcome,” she said at the outset.

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TVD UK

TVD Live Shots: Hollywood Vampires, The Damned, and The Darkness at SSE Arena, 6/20

The history of the Hollywood Vampires originates in the 1970s on the Sunset Strip at the world-famous Rainbow Bar & Grill. The upstairs bar is where the original Vamps formed a drinking club that included legends Keith Moon, John Lennon, Harry Nilsson, and just about any other rock star who found themselves passing through.

While the club would lay dormant for a couple of decades, Alice Cooper and Johnny Depp would breathe new life into the Vampires in 2015. Since then, a band has consisted of the core of Cooper, Depp, and Aerosmith axeman Joe Perry. They’ve played gigs and festivals, released an album, and finally made their way over to the UK for a tour in 2018. This is the first time I would see the band live—and they were spectacular.

I’ve read a few recent reviews that claimed Depp was “staggering” across the stage but I’m not sure what the hell they’re talking about. The Vampires looked and sounded great. And anyone who’s asking the question of whether or not Depp deserves to share the stage with rock ‘n’ roll royalty should listen to what his conspirators have to say.

Joe Perry has praised his actor friend’s musical skill, saying he was as “good as anybody I’ve worked with,” and “I don’t think he’d be up on the stage with Alice and me and the other cats if he wasn’t holding his own as he does.” Cooper’s praise is equally flattering, adding, “He’s really a good player. He’s a musician through and through I don’t think of him as an actor. He’s a guitar player.” If that’s not enough credentials, then move along and find another supergroup to bitch about.

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The TVD Storefront

TVD Radar: Burning Down The Haus: Punk Rock, Revolution, and the Fall of the Berlin Wall by Tim Mohr in stores 9/11

VIA PRESS RELEASE | “The best punk book since Please Kill Me. ​—Legs McNeil, author of Please Kill Me: The Uncensored Oral History of Punk

Writer and award-winning German-language translator Tim Mohr has announced the release of his first book, Burning Down the Haus: Punk Rock, Revolution, and the Fall of the Berlin Wall, out September 11, 2018 via Algonquin Books. Telling the little-known story of a group of East German kids who rebelled and helped set the world on fire, Mohr takes readers on a fascinating trip through the 1980s.

Rejecting the dismal, pre-ordained futures the dictatorship tried to impose on them, these teenagers embraced punk—the aesthetic, the music, the liberating feeling of collective anarchy—and defied the state and its security apparatus. Banding together, they faced down surveillance, police violence, blacklisting from schools and jobs, and even imprisonment as they fought to create and control their own individual futures.

Beginning in earnest in the late 1970s, a handful of young people who had lived in the shadow of the Berlin Wall their entire lives caught snatches of punk music on forbidden British military radio broadcasts and began to question authority, daring to dress differently and make music that was dangerously critical of the government. Living inside the borders of East Germany but outside the system, they were hassled in the streets relentlessly pursued by the Stasi—the notorious East German secret police—but would not be deterred in their pursuit of punk.

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  • SUPPORTING YOUR LOCAL INDIE SHOPS SINCE 2007


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